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  1. #1
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    Embarrassed I need an interviewee for a school project.

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    Just 9 questions...I'm a technical college student, learning autoCAD 2007, and we needed to interview someone who used it in their work. Well, my interviewee fell through today...the day before it's due.
    So if someone could answer these, that'd be great! Thanks!

    1. Who do you work for?
    2. What's your job title?
    3. How did you learn CAD? School, self taught, other?
    4. What was your experience learning CAD? exciting, frustrating, etc.
    5. What advice do you have for someone learning autoCAD?
    6. Do you use manual drafting and if so, for what?
    7. Do you use 3D autoCAD or just 2D?
    8. Do you use layers, lineweight, linetypes, etc.
    9. What are advantages of AutoCAD vs. manual drafting?

    Thanks a million to anyone who answers...if anyone answers.
    *Lola

  2. #2
    Quantum Mechanic ReMark's Avatar
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    ReMark's Discipline Details
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    CAD Draftsman/Designer...chemical manufacturing.
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    I work for a specialty chemical manufacturer. I do a little bit of everything from P&IDs to civil to architectural and structural.
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    I'll give it a shot.

    1. King Industries, Inc. (a specialty chemical company), Norwalk, CT

    2. CAD Manager

    3. Self-taught, seminars, community college courses, online courses

    4. Initially frustrating (early days of CAD), thereafter it was exciting; especially 3D.

    5. Advice: practice often, always be willing to learn something new, don't get stuck in a rut using the same set of commands, seek advice when stuck, join the CADTutor forum.

    6. No longer use manual drafting; everything now done on computer. But I haven't forgotten those skills. If we ever went back to the "dark ages" I could still produce a drawing in ink on vellum but it sure would feel strange doing so.

    7. Combination of 2D and 3D. I'd say it was a 75/25% split at the moment.

    8. Yes, we use layers, lineweights, linetypes, etc.

    9. Advantages: repetitive items are a snap, tables are easier to do, layers add control, drawings are easier to correct, no more pencil sharpeners or ink running under the edges of a triangle! I could add a hundred more reasons but I don't want to get verbose. Suffice it to say, if you are old enough to have worked "on the board" yet made the jump to CAD when it came out then you truely appreciate the differences.
    "I have only come here seeking knowledge. Things they wouldn't teach me of in college." The Police

    Eat brains...gain more knowledge!

    I'm now a full member of the Society for the Promotion of Mediocrity in CAD. Standards? We don't need no stinkin' standards! Take whatever advice I offer and do the opposite.

  3. #3
    Banned Alan Cullen's Avatar
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    Yeah.....I'll give it a go too.....normally only get to do this when we have work experience troops through....

    But much as ReMark has said.....

    1. A Consulting Engineering Firm.....specialising in Civil and Structural engineering.

    2. Senior Civil Technical Officer.

    3. Originally an AutoCad course, then self taught for a while, then back to University (that was basically to do a uni course on computers)...then back to self taught. (No specific courses in those days).

    4. Very frustrating.....no real support in those days. But it was also extremely interesting....particularly understanding what lisp was about......then learning lisp and seeing the power of lisp. The other thing is that I learnt Acad a few years before most drafties in Aus.....so I had a few years advantage on them.....and that helped to cement my position.

    5. Study hard.....today the support is there. Read books, try new techniques....ask other people.....and as ReMark said.....join CadTutor. You will not look back.

    6. When I went for the interview for my current job some 15 yrs ago, the boss asked me if I could still work on a drawing board......I assured him I definitely could, I had just come from a consultancy where that was the requirement (the norm)........I have never had to go back to a drawing board since.

    7. We are civil engineering......we only use 2D acad. We use other software (specific engineering design) that is very capable of 3D if we ever need it for client presentation.

    8. Yes....but not by block or layer. We have a layering system that works on a specific type of entity....e.g. "ex roads". There could be many entities on that layer that fit the catagory of "ex roads" that all have their own linetype, colour, etc. We try to keep the number of layers down to minimum.

    9. To me the greatest difference is the absolute speed of drawing and the ability to modify/edit the drawing to suit. You cannot do that on tracing paper. If there is a modification on tracing paper.......you have to figure out where to put it.......get the razor blade out.......scrap away.......fit the modification in as best you can. The other great advantage with acad is that you can modify away....and the drawing maintains a standard. They all look pretty well the same.....A standard has been created....no more freehand lettering.....no more so many different styles.....it all now looks the same.

    Hope that helps.....but a sideline......I was on a board at College, then from 1969 onwards (at work)......I will never go back to a board....

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    1) In college so i dont have a steady drafting job like most here

    2) -

    3) My first experiences in CAD was with an anciend program called "SwiftCAD" back around '93-95 when I was in elementary school working in my dads machine shop. There I was self taught. In highschool i took every drafting class offered (5) and this got me excellent experience in making simple to complex 2D drawings of everything from parts to assemblies to working draings and floor/elevation plans. Since then Ive mostly dabbled in the 3D aspect stressings one operation at a time until Im comfortable with doing and possibly teaching it.

    4) I caught onto the whole concept of using CAD extremely fast and the new stuff since then really hasnt been worse than a few swear words.

    5) Practice, just draw everyday common objects until your comfortable with them and dont have to ask "how do I do this." Practice different methods of drawing things and you might find a faster easier way. When your stuck dont be afraid to hit F1 and search for the command in question. The help files are pretty good

    6) The only time I use manual drawing is for super fast "back of a napkin" sketch or so.

    7) Sadly I used 2D more for useful means. My 3D so far has been confined to practice/exhibition and for conceptual/prototypes like the FSAE car

    The max layers I ever use is 2: layer 0 and a NOPLOT layer for plotting. Lineweight changes are rare, but I do use linetypes extensively

    9) Speed, ease of modification, ease of copying accurately, ease of reproduction (plotting), speed of distribution (I can email a drawing to Japan and have it in production much faster than mailing a piece of vellum)
    The most important aspect of CAD over manual is precision. Even a high priced and well sharpened pencil is going to have a difficult time getting consistant precision down to .0001

  5. #5
    Full Member BigMikeLV's Avatar
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    1. Who do you work for?
    Las Vegas Valley Water District (Las Vegas, NV)

    2. What's your job title?
    Enginnering Tech

    3. How did you learn CAD? School, self taught, other?
    Learned Versa CAD in High School, AutoCAD 10 in first year of college, CADKEY 7.0 in years 2-3 of college, then AutoCAD R13 and up at my current Job.

    4. What was your experience learning CAD? exciting, frustrating, etc.
    Easiest Cad i had used, and was pretty straight forward.

    5. What advice do you have for someone learning autoCAD?
    Pay attention to HOW things work and learn the correct ways of finding commands. Dont first start out with shortcuts. Learn OUT OF THE BOX AutoCAD before customizing everything.

    6. Do you use manual drafting and if so, for what?
    Not so much anymore. If anythign I sketch up details on paper and then finish them in cad.

    7. Do you use 3D autoCAD or just 2D?
    Just 2D for now.

    8. Do you use layers, lineweight, linetypes, etc.
    Of course. You have to.

    9. What are advantages of AutoCAD vs. manual drafting?
    Speed, precision, abilities to reproduce. The advantages are limitless.

  6. #6
    Forum Newbie
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    Thanks guys.
    *L

  7. #7
    Senior Member jdkriek's Avatar
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    1. Who do you work for?
    Holland Architectural Limestone, it's a division of Holland Marble Company, Inc. in Carrollton, TX

    2. What's your job title?
    Architectural Design Drafter

    3. How did you learn CAD? School, self taught, other?
    I currently attend the Computer Drafting and Design program at ITT Technical Institute in Richardson, TX. However, I have learned much more through professional work experience over the last seven years. To paraphrase my boss, "You know how to draw, I'll teach you what to draw".

    4. What was your experience learning CAD? exciting, frustrating, etc.
    To be honest, it was and still is exciting and frustrating at the same time. Things go wrong; don't come out as expected, especially in the manufacturing business. This makes it all that much more satisfying when it does.

    5. What advice do you have for someone learning AutoCAD?
    As much as possible; do not shortchange yourself on anything. Take advantage of every opportunity you possibly can to lean every ounce of knowledge available.

    6. Do you use manual drafting and if so, for what?
    Yes and No. You have to be able to effectively communicate ideas from paper to computer. If I'm at a job site, I don’t have access to a computer there. I need to manually draft well enough there, to draft well back at the office.

    7. Do you use 3D AutoCAD or just 2D?
    I use AutoCAD for 2D and Inventor for 3D

    8. Do you use layers, lineweight, linetypes, etc.
    Yes, a lot of them. It's more for the manufacturing department, than it is for us, but it is vital we be able to distinguish between different line weights and line types, thus layers.

    9. What are advantages of AutoCAD vs. manual drafting?
    In my industry they work hand in hand. Your boss or client may only be able to sketch something up on paper, but its dimension orientated and it has to be accurate in that aspect. In general I think CAD drafters are finding themselves unprepared when they sit down to draw on the computer. Drafters should first be formally trained in pen and paper manual drafting techniques, such as “orthographic projections”. This is because the user always has more than one method to draw an object and has more existing geometry to work off of. Through this type of formal training, drafters learn to base their drawing techniques off existing geometry and not conceptualizations. Formal drafters do not have computers to aid them in the design process and thus do not rely on CAD to do the base work for them. Concept or design drafting is important; however there should be a foundation for the user to work off.
    Jonathan D. Kriek
    Manufacturing Solutions Engineer
    KETIV Technologies, Inc.
    Autodesk Platinum Partner

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