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    Senior Member nscherneck's Avatar
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    Default Fastener threads...

    Here goes....new topic....

    Im trying to get the threads on a fastener to show. Is it only possible in the drawing?

    Thanks.
    Nathan Scherneck,
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    if you want to show a thread which is physically cut into the part i believe you have to make a helix and do an extrude. its a little tedious but ive done it before. It helps to have a machinist handbook on hand that way you can get the exact measurements for the pitch, etc.

    if you want to show a "cosmetic thread" basicall a image is overlayed on the hole surface and it is rippled to simulate threads. If you use the hole wizard then under options you have to check the box that says "with thread callout" and pick the screw image in the middle.

    On drawings in plan view you will see the hole and the outer diameter of the thread in a dashed line. hope that helps.

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    Super Moderator Lazer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bloodwig80 View Post
    physically cut into the part
    And remember this way takes up huge memory so not a good idea if you have lots of threads in an assembly, use Bloodwigs second solution, this way is more common and you can have as many threads as you like
    USING AUTOCAD 2015 AND INVENTOR 2015, ALIAS 2015 SHOWCASE 2015.

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  4. #4
    Senior Member nscherneck's Avatar
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    ill stick with what is standard practice for others. i dont need to see the threads if its not common to do so. thanks guys.
    Nathan Scherneck,
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    yeah i forgot to add that. it'll rape memory like crazy.

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    Default Threading

    nscherneck,
    It is true that real threads use a lot of resources of your machine, but real cut threads exposed on a model are infinitely more impressive to a client, or boss than "fake" threads drawn with anular grooves, or the real poor quality cosmetic threads offered by Solidworks Textures. And let's not forget that there will be times when "real" threads will be demanded by either client or boss, so it really is in your best interest to learn how to make them.
    Don't be intimidated by threading, it is not that difficult at all. If you feel that you would like to learn the procedure, e-mail me and I will give you a link where you can get an audio/video tutorial that is about 18MGB in size. If you have a broadband connection, it will not take that long to download.
    De Angelis

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    Quote Originally Posted by deangelis View Post
    nscherneck,
    It is true that real threads use a lot of resources of your machine, but real cut threads exposed on a model are infinitely more impressive to a client, or boss than "fake" threads drawn with anular grooves, or the real poor quality cosmetic threads offered by Solidworks Textures. And let's not forget that there will be times when "real" threads will be demanded by either client or boss, so it really is in your best interest to learn how to make them.
    Don't be intimidated by threading, it is not that difficult at all. If you feel that you would like to learn the procedure, e-mail me and I will give you a link where you can get an audio/video tutorial that is about 18MGB in size. If you have a broadband connection, it will not take that long to download.
    De Angelis
    I just joined this forum so have yet to learn where email contact info is hidden. I'd love to have that tutorial for threads you mention, so if you see this or anyone else, please contact me at bruce AT supertrap DOT com. Or, if someone else can tell me how to fine the email for this individual I'd sure appreciate it. - Regards, Bruce L. Jones

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    Luminous Being JD Mather's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bloodwig80 View Post
    i believe you have to make a helix and do an extrude. its a little tedious but ive done it before.
    Sweep - not extrude.
    Certified SolidWorks Professional
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    http://home.pct.edu/~jmather/content..._Tutorials.htm

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    Quote Originally Posted by JD Mather View Post
    Sweep - not extrude.
    Yes, a sweep of some sort is what I expected, although I'm still hoping that something else is just been overlooked in my instruction or references thus far; hence my request for the tutorial in question. At this point, I expect that I'll have to find the correct thread form in some reference like Machinery's Handbook or an actual National Standard like FED-STD-H28 and then draw the profile and then use that outline to make the sweep/cut. Then I am not sure parts can be mated using the actual threads... Talk about tedious and time consuming! But it is something I will do, as it will be something needed at some point in time.

    One poster above was right, maybe in the course of the mundane heap of the usual, schematic threads* depicted in the finished drawing may be all that is basically required, but there are times when an actual model of the finished threads may be just what a designer or - heaven forbid - customer may just HAVE TO HAVE. This may be especially true in new product design where every little thing might make a difference; especially with the less common thread forms like square, acme or buttress. Or what about types of interference threads or pipe threads?

    It leaves me convinced that CAD programs are made by other than those who actually understand and use the final product they squirt on the screen with every mouse-click; made by those with more computer or drafting background rather than engineering or machining. Anyone who might think it not an essential part of a mechanical package for anything is completely clueless concerning one of the very first articles important in the history of mechanical design, the first being the wheel and the second being the screw!

    How wonderful it would be to have an exacting thread form/standard applied to a solid shaft or hole with the precision possible with a CAD program and then be able to see them function as they should to VERIFY it. Otherwise the CAD program itself is USELESS for a prime component of mechanical design and the parts would have to be prototyped to test functionality - just as we have had to do BEFORE the advent of CAD. That is SUPPOSED to be what CAD was for, to reduce or eliminate that necessity. Odd, to say the least.

    I'm VERY new to SW and just finished an introductory class in December and have been drawing everything like mad to learn it better. Frankly, I am more than a little surprised at the crudity of this function in SolidWorks. I can make thread depictions far faster and easier on a board with a pencil and old-fashioned thread template. Considering that SW touts itself to be so dedicated to mechanical design they're completely missed the boat on this one. I think I may have assumed that making threads in SW would be some easy menu setup made just for threads, internal and external. I know several people in the class I attended had made just that assumption and were SHOCKED at the absence of a function they said they would need EVERY DAY because designing fasteners and fittings was what they DID!

    Well, sorry if it sounded at all pontificating, sorry for the vent ... but I'm just flabbergasted. I would, however, still love to hear from anyone with more information. That way I can assemble a little catalog to use when I need it at least.

    Thank you very much for your help!


    * Schematic Threads were created as a 2D drafting convention to make drawing on paper faster and easier for the hordes of lesser skilled draftsmen in the days when the contract for the TDP for the Arc was awarded.

    --
    Respectfully,
    Bruce L. Jones


    Last edited by Cad64; 14th Feb 2009 at 04:43 am. Reason: Please do not advertise your business or paid services in the forum

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    Forum Deity shift1313's Avatar
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    Registered forum members do not see this ad.

    bl, i would be careful about putting your phone numbers and email in your sig. you never know who may get a hold of it


    this is one thing i really like about unigraphics. When you create threads it actually creates threads.


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