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  1. #11
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    Don't knock it unless you've tried it. I learned CADD using Generic CAD, just before Autodesk bought it and ran it into the ground. In my last job I used PowerCADD for 4 years. I have been using AutoCAD in my present job for just over a year, and also use Visual CADD (a Windows version of Generic CAD) when I want to draw something quickly.

    When I am drawing in CAD, I have always thought in full size, whether the program uses a full size model, like Generic CAD or AutoCAD, or is prescaled like PowerCADD. When drawing to scale, you still draw full size, but the computer keeps track of the scale. The main difference is that the scale is set when you start drawing, rather than when you plot. Lettering, dimension arrows, etc., are real-world size, so you don't have to change styles and letter heights. It's something like working in Paperspace, without the complications of setting up viewports, etc.

    AutoCAD has extra power for large groups working on large projects, but the added complexity that comes from this power often makes doing simple drawings more cumbersome than it needs to be.

    Flyingal, be sure that scale factors in your dimension definitions are all set to 1, and that units are consistant (there are many places to accidently change these without realizing it). Make sure everything fits into a 88' x 136' rectangle, then set the scale to 1/8" = 1' when you plot.

    I used to love flying Cherokees and Tomahawks, before I had kids and still had time and money, but I've never flown a Cub. I'll bet it's a lot of fun!

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Sweet
    Don't knock it unless you've tried it. I learned CADD using Generic CAD, just before Autodesk bought it and ran it into the ground. In my last job I used PowerCADD for 4 years. I have been using AutoCAD in my present job for just over a year, and also use Visual CADD (a Windows version of Generic CAD) when I want to draw something quickly.

    When I am drawing in CAD, I have always thought in full size, whether the program uses a full size model, like Generic CAD or AutoCAD, or is prescaled like PowerCADD. When drawing to scale, you still draw full size, but the computer keeps track of the scale. The main difference is that the scale is set when you start drawing, rather than when you plot. Lettering, dimension arrows, etc., are real-world size, so you don't have to change styles and letter heights. It's something like working in Paperspace, without the complications of setting up viewports, etc.

    AutoCAD has extra power for large groups working on large projects, but the added complexity that comes from this power often makes doing simple drawings more cumbersome than it needs to be.

    Flyingal, be sure that scale factors in your dimension definitions are all set to 1, and that units are consistant (there are many places to accidently change these without realizing it). Make sure everything fits into a 88' x 136' rectangle, then set the scale to 1/8" = 1' when you plot.

    I used to love flying Cherokees and Tomahawks, before I had kids and still had time and money, but I've never flown a Cub. I'll bet it's a lot of fun!
    Played with it several times on the co-workers Macs. I never said PowerCADD was inferior or worse (if so not what I meant). The idea that your designs will be better on a Mac and/or PowerCADD is what I am laughing at. How absurd! They are simply tools used to complete a task. The owner of PowerCADD seems to have a chip on his shoulder with Acad. I see PC as a very powerful Illustrator with drafting tools.
    Please do not PM me with CAD questions. Post your question on the forum. Our users are the best out there and you'll get the best possible answer to your question.

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  3. #13
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    Unhappy Scaling and Reluctance to dimension drgs.

    I find the scale problem is closely related to the total lack of dimensions on today's arch drawings related to planning applications - so much so that I'm beginning to believe that unscrupulous firms do it purposefully to obfuscate the planners or lay persons who have a legitimate reason for opposing a planning application but cannot 'read' an arch drg. as currently offered.

    The Gov's Planning Portal and many LPA's support on line planning apps. and whereas asks the PP requests that drawings should at least bear sufficient dimensions to calculate the volume, LPA's make no such strictures, not even to ask for a scale bar - hence the high number of arguments and strength of ill feeling existing between planners and the public.

    Perhaps someone can enlighten me. I,for one, can see no reason at all today for not dimensioning all drgs.

    I confess to have been apprenticed in the old school!

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    Default drawing scale factor input

    I understand how to determine a drawing scale factor, but I can't find where to input the drawing scale factor into AutoCad.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cwdesign View Post
    I understand how to determine a drawing scale factor, but I can't find where to input the drawing scale factor into AutoCad.
    Welcome to the forum.

    When you are working in modelspace everything should be drawn full size, 1:1, with no scaling.
    Scale doesn't come into play until you start working in VIEWPORTS.
    Remember that a viewport is essentially a translucent window through your sheet of paper,
    to the DRAWING which should be full scale in modelspace behind.
    No matter what you are drawing up to and including the solar system and beyond, you do it full size.
    Given that, it is more than likely that you will typically have to scale the view shown through
    your viewport to fit what you want to show in the viewport on your printed file.
    You can set the scale of a viewport by selecting it in paperspace, and adjusting the scale in the PROPERTIES or the QUICK PROPERTIES palette.
    If you have the VIEWPORT SCALE enabled in the lower right hand corner of your screen you can also change it there.
    There is also an icon available there to lock or unlock the viewport.
    Once you have adjusted it to display what, how (visualstyle), and at the scale you want LOCK the viewport, so that it can not be
    inadvertently changed while you or someone else is working with or on the drawing.

    If you look at the image you will see all of the relevant information regarding
    the selected viewport displayed in my QUICK PROPERTIES palette, and you will see
    the viewport scale and lock icons circled in red.

    You can have lots of different viewports on a sheet, and each may display different perspective, visual styles, layer visibility states and scales.
    A viewport should always be created on a dedicated layer ( I use Mview) , and that layer should be set as nonprinting.
    Double clicking inside of a viewport will take you through the window to modelspace (although it will display a white background, or at least the same color as your paperspace), but you are
    really in MODELSPACE, and so can work with any entities which are there. If you want to you can also use the MAXIMIZE VIEWPORT button to enter MODELSPACE and see it,
    with the default color or whatever custom color you might have changed it to in your OPTIONS.

    When you are setting up your viewport layout there is no need to unlock it, if for instance your scale is already
    determined and set.
    If you are double clicked into your viewport you can move things around in modelspace without
    unlocking your viewport, which means that your scale is not affected, and you can lay everything out as you want it to appear on your printed drawing.

    To cycle through available viewports on a sheet double click into any of them,
    then use CTRL+R to switch from one to another.
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  6. #16
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    Thanks for the welcome and answer Dadgad.




    We don't seem to be on the same page about the intent of my question. I am asking about the drawing scale factor rather than a drawing scale.


    Quote Originally Posted by odon View Post
    The scale factor of a drawing should be determined and utilized during the time of drawing set up.
    The proper scale factor is extremely important because it makes sure that text (height, etc.), dimension values (dimscale), hatch patterns, limits, and linetype scale (ltscale) are plotted at the proper size.
    I need to find where I put in the drawing scale factor which will adjust the objects mentioned in the above quote.

  7. #17
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    Are you using a paper space layout with at least one viewport? Yes or no?
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  8. #18
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    No. I'm just working in model space for now.

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    What are you doing that you are being prompted for a scale factor?

    BTW...do you intend on making use of Annotative scaling for your text and dimensions?
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  10. #20
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    Setting a drawing scale factor is part of setting up a drawing. Without the drawing scale factor set, I will not be able to read the dimensions and text - they will be too small on the screen. I would have to define text height in feet. Then, when I do want to plot, the text would not plot correctly.

    I am not 100% sure how to answer your second question. I need to review the workings of annotative scaling.
    I'm thinking that annotative scaling will adjust the text and dims if I change scales, but I believe that I still have to define a drawing scale factor when I set up the drawing.

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