+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 8 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 73
  1. #21
    Senior Member
    Using
    Architectural DT 2007
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Earth Correctional Facility, Inmate #000001
    Posts
    101

    Default

    Registered forum members do not see this ad.

    I wub my ADT, I would never part with it.
    "God help you if I find any exploded hatches.... for every exploded hatch I find, I shall kill you."

  2. #22
    Super Moderator f700es's Avatar
    Computer Details
    f700es's Computer Details
    Operating System:
    Windows 7 Pro (W)/Windows 7 Home Premium (H)
    Computer:
    Dell Optiplex 9020 (W)/ Dell Inspiron 570 (H)
    Motherboard:
    Intel (W)/AMD (H)
    CPU:
    Intel Core i7-4770 quad (W)/AMD Athlon 2 X4 (H)
    RAM:
    16 GB DDR3 (W)/ 6GB DDR3 (H)
    Graphics:
    nVidia Geforce GTX 645 (W)/nVidia GF GT430 (H)
    Primary Storage:
    256 gb SSD 0/ 1TB 1 (W)/1 TB (H)
    Secondary Storage:
    Seagate FreeAgent Go 320gb
    Monitor:
    Samsung P2770HD 28" LCD and Samsung B2430 (W)/Acer 28" LCD (H)
    Discipline
    Facilities Mgmt
    f700es's Discipline Details
    Occupation
    Space Database Admin
    Discipline
    Facilities Mgmt
    Details
    Archibus Management, Space planning, Design
    Using
    AutoCAD 2017
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC - USA
    Posts
    5,536

    Default

    Rhino v4 can do it better than anything, it also slices bread and takes the dog for walks.......(smack - slaps hand) oh my bad
    Please do not PM me with CAD questions. Post your question on the forum. Our users are the best out there and you'll get the best possible answer to your question.

    - http://f700es.deviantart.com/gallery/ -


  3. #23
    Senior Member
    Using
    Architectural DT 2005
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    334

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Strix View Post
    Iain, was that personal attack really necessary?

    the op only said SOME drawings he's had to work to were unworkable - which I can appreciate from either side of the drawing production process

    If all he's doing is domestic work, there's no reason why he can't learn to produce his own drawings - especially if he's doing repeats of similar projects rather than bespoke projects each time
    Strix,

    No personal attack intended.

    I wouldn't like to give him advice that would send him down a route, for what could be a long time only for him to fall flat on his face.

    A builder could never compete with an architect in the cad/planning process department. There is simply too much involved. If your in the business then you should know better. Planning can be a very complicated and lengthy sensitive process.

    Why subject the guy to wasting his time, when it could be better spent elsewhere.
    I've worked with several cowboy contractors who think architects and engineers are just a complete waste of time and they can do better...infact they think that about pretty much all the professionals. Not all contractors mind you..mostly only the non-professional building contractors I have worked with.

    I'm just giving the guy a shortcut out of trouble thats all.

    In no way is it a personal attack... Just giving "real advice" sigh.

    Its one thing to draw designs, its another to see things from an architects view with respect to the full planning process of negotiating your designs with a local authority and other design professionals.

    It all depends what he wants to get out of this. If it is for small house extensions then AutoCad would do everything he wants. Like with all programs there is a learning curve which he needs to get over.

    What he really needs to understand is what he is doing with the program, and not depend on automation.

    Perhaps if there is anyone here from the architects/cad areas who can also put some light to this builder that his road to taking the role of the designer is not an easy one and should be thought out a bit more carefully???
    Last edited by iain9876; 16th Jul 2007 at 05:24 pm.

  4. #24
    Junior Member
    Using
    AutoCAD 2007
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Winder, Georgia
    Posts
    24

    Default

    I will agree with iain for the most part.

    It is one thing to draw a design, it is another whole part of it to know why it is drawn.

    This is why I stressed that you have to know how things go together before you can just jump in and start designing a house. Spans, loads, space use and material selection all play a key role in the design. If you don't know why a beam has to be in a certain place, then it is better left to a design professional.

    I guess a way to put in to perspective of a builder would be like this:

    Any one can pick up a hammer and call themselves a builder..just like any one can pick up a pencil, draw a few lines and call themselves a designer.

    There is a lot more to being a builder than just knowing how to swing a hammer...and there is a lot more to designing a home than just knowing how to draw lines.

  5. #25
    Senior Member
    Using
    Architectural DT 2005
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    334

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by kmapro View Post
    I will agree with iain for the most part.

    It is one thing to draw a design, it is another whole part of it to know why it is drawn.

    This is why I stressed that you have to know how things go together before you can just jump in and start designing a house. Spans, loads, space use and material selection all play a key role in the design. If you don't know why a beam has to be in a certain place, then it is better left to a design professional.

    I guess a way to put in to perspective of a builder would be like this:

    Any one can pick up a hammer and call themselves a builder..just like any one can pick up a pencil, draw a few lines and call themselves a designer.

    There is a lot more to being a builder than just knowing how to swing a hammer...and there is a lot more to designing a home than just knowing how to draw lines.
    I couldnt have put it better myself....thats more or less the point I was making in a round about sort of way.
    That there is more to the drawing than a pretty picture....I was trying to say its a long learning path to go down and one that shouldn't be taken lightly...especially if you are trying it out for your business..it could be the cause for great embarrassment.... so why bother... stick to something your good at. Asking for advice on a good package to change things isn't the answer.

  6. #26
    Senior Member
    Using
    Architectural DT 2007
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Earth Correctional Facility, Inmate #000001
    Posts
    101

    Default

    I was a contractor for 7 years. I am now an architect. To speak from personal experience. MOST architects and designers do not understand what they are designing from our perspective. It's just lines on a piece of paper to you guys. Being a contractor gives us the gift of visualization. Something that people with no practical knowledge of building have no idea about. It is my personal opinion that everyone who wants to design structures, should be mandated to spend 5 years in the construction trade. I could go on and on about this forever. Bottom line is, contractors can see many things architects and designers cannot. They can learn the rest of the design process. But people without hands on knowlege can never see it from our point of view.
    "God help you if I find any exploded hatches.... for every exploded hatch I find, I shall kill you."

  7. #27
    Senior Member
    Using
    Architectural DT 2005
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    334

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cad Sponge View Post
    I was a contractor for 7 years. I am now an architect. To speak from personal experience. MOST architects and designers do not understand what they are designing from our perspective. It's just lines on a piece of paper to you guys. Being a contractor gives us the gift of visualization. Something that people with no practical knowledge of building have no idea about. It is my personal opinion that everyone who wants to design structures, should be mandated to spend 5 years in the construction trade. I could go on and on about this forever. Bottom line is, contractors can see many things architects and designers cannot. They can learn the rest of the design process. But people without hands on knowlege can never see it from our point of view.
    Exactly Right,

  8. #28
    Junior Member
    Using
    AutoCAD 2007
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Winder, Georgia
    Posts
    24

    Default

    CAD Sponge - I believe you hit one of the on going arguements directly on the head!!!

    I am a member of another site for design and that site is primarliy ran by architects. I frequent the residential design area of the forum and make my comments known there as well. I am repeatedly shot down by architects who believe I have no business in the design field because I do not have the "proper" schooling.

    No, I am not a registered architect nor have I ever portrayed myself as one. I refer to myself as a design professional. I got my schooling by the school of hard knocks.

    I have owned and operated a poured wall (cast in place concrete) company and I currently work for one of (if not the) largest engineered wood product companies in the world.

    I have pretty much worked in every facet of residential building - with the exception of roofing - so I have been around the block when it comes to building.

    Along with my day job (at the EWP company) I also own and operate my own residential design/build company - mostly focusing on the design part right now.

    I am in 100% agreement with you in the idea that architects (only because that profession is covered through a governing body) should have to work in the field before they can be issued a license. Now with that being siad, I also believe that a designer should have credentials pointing back to actual in field experience as well...I am not bashing architects, just focusing on the fact that they are licensed and governed.

    I wish residential designers had a governing body that was mandated - other than the AIBD.

    From my experiences, you can make anything look good on paper but it is in the field where it counts.


    Now Caleb - please do not see our comments negatively. I speak for myself when I say that I encourage you to venture out and see what you can make happen - and I believe I speak for all of us - BUT we want you ta know that there is a whole lot more to it than just knowing how to operate a CAD program and knowing how to draw lines.

    Yes, you do have a leg up in the fact that you are a builder and you see where areas could be improved. I would almost venture to bet that it is just the quality of the plans you are working from hat is the problem.

    IMHO - there is a fine line between supplying enough information to accurately build a structure and supplying more than enough which causes confusion and misunderstaning.

  9. #29
    Senior Member
    Using
    Architectural DT 2005
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    334

    Default

    With all that said though, I hear Archicad is a very good option other than AutoCad.

  10. #30
    Senior Member
    Using
    Architectural DT 2007
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    218

    Default

    Registered forum members do not see this ad.

    Quote Originally Posted by kmapro View Post
    CAD Sponge - I believe you hit one of the on going arguements directly on the head!!!

    I am a member of another site for design and that site is primarliy ran by architects. I frequent the residential design area of the forum and make my comments known there as well. I am repeatedly shot down by architects who believe I have no business in the design field because I do not have the "proper" schooling.
    I work for architects and am going to school right now for a construction management degree. And I have seen this attitude thrown at me (about not having the "proper" schooling) more times than I can count. I have worked with arhitects who have 10 more years experiance in this field than I have, but I can still put together a better set of drawings than they can. (I still have a lot of learning to go, but I have worked with some really bad architects that were more worried about the pretty pictures than the actual condition of their drawings, and I've worked with good architects too.) Their attitude about my sub-human status really irritates me, especially when I do a better job than someone with the "right" education and a license.

    Sorry for the rant, but my point is that getting field experiance is more important than learning a software package and will inevidably change anyways (as is with all software). So try working as a carpenter or something else along those lines first.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts