+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
  1. #1
    Junior Member Posho91's Avatar
    Using
    AutoCAD 2011
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    18

    Default Best way to model a steel tension cable?

    Registered forum members do not see this ad.

    Hi,
    I'm familiar with basic solid modelling for walls, roofs etc. but for my project at the moment I have a concrete wall with a number of suspended platforms held up by 45 degree steel tension cables.
    I dont know much about curves and pipes and things...

    Do you know the easiest way to model a steel tension cable with some form of connecting eyelet at each end. Preferably the cable should look as though formed from twisted wires rather than a smooth rod.

    Thanks very much if you can help!

  2. #2
    Forum Deity Jack_O'neill's Avatar
    Computer Details
    Jack_O'neill's Computer Details
    Operating System:
    xp
    Discipline
    Architectural
    Jack_O'neill's Discipline Details
    Discipline
    Architectural
    Details
    The bulk of my business is commercial curtainwall, site plans and floor plans. I do occasionally get a bit of tool and die, and the odd house now and again.
    Using
    AutoCAD 2010
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    lost in the Arkansas wilderness
    Posts
    2,146

    Default

    Something like this perhaps?

    steel cable.JPG

    Draw the shape of the end of the cable first. I did it by polar arraying circles so that they overlapped, then trimmed out all but the outer bits to get that "scalloped" shape. Pedit it into a polyline, then sweep it along the a path where you want the cable to be, using a "twist angle". The longer the cable, the more twist you'll need to create the illusion. What you see here was 270° on a random length line approximately 7 inches long.
    Never try to teach a pig to sing. It wastes your time and annoys the pig. -Robert Heinlein

  3. #3
    Quantum Mechanic ReMark's Avatar
    Computer Details
    ReMark's Computer Details
    Operating System:
    Windows 7 Pro 64-bit
    Computer:
    Thinkmate
    Motherboard:
    Intel DX58SO2 LGA1366 X58
    CPU:
    Intel i7-960 Quad-core 3.20GHz 8MB cache
    RAM:
    12GB (3x4GB) PC3-106000 DDR3
    Graphics:
    nVidia Quadro 4000, 2GB GDDR5
    Primary Storage:
    150GB Velocipraptor 10,000 rpm
    Secondary Storage:
    none
    Monitor:
    Dell P24LLH - 24" wide screen LCD
    Discipline
    See details...
    ReMark's Discipline Details
    Occupation
    CAD Draftsman/Designer...chemical manufacturing.
    Discipline
    See details below.
    Details
    I work for a specialty chemical manufacturer. I do a little bit of everything from P&IDs to civil to architectural and structural.
    Using
    AutoCAD 2015
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Norwalk, CT USofA
    Posts
    40,077

    Default

    How about using a helix? The connector at each end shouldn't be all that difficult.
    "I have only come here seeking knowledge. Things they wouldn't teach me of in college." The Police

    Eat brains...gain more knowledge!

    I'm now a full member of the Society for the Promotion of Mediocrity in CAD. Standards? We don't need no stinkin' standards! Take whatever advice I offer and do the opposite.

  4. #4
    Forum Deity Jack_O'neill's Avatar
    Computer Details
    Jack_O'neill's Computer Details
    Operating System:
    xp
    Discipline
    Architectural
    Jack_O'neill's Discipline Details
    Discipline
    Architectural
    Details
    The bulk of my business is commercial curtainwall, site plans and floor plans. I do occasionally get a bit of tool and die, and the odd house now and again.
    Using
    AutoCAD 2010
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    lost in the Arkansas wilderness
    Posts
    2,146

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ReMark View Post
    How about using a helix? The connector at each end shouldn't be all that difficult.
    Connector is nothing. Easy bit that. I tried using helix 2 different ways (see below). The one on the right was created using the shape I described above swept along a helix. The one in the middle was created by sweeping one of the single small circles along a helix, then arraying it around it's self followed by a union. Didn't come out quite right. The one on the far left was created by taking the scalloped shape, copying it every inch and rotating it 18° each time. The 18° is the angle between the center of the "hump" and the bottom of the "valley", and lofting. Still didn't look quite right. It might work, but somebody smarter than me will have to figure it out. Sweep with a twist was the easiest way I could find.
    cables.jpg
    Never try to teach a pig to sing. It wastes your time and annoys the pig. -Robert Heinlein

  5. #5
    Forum Deity Jack_O'neill's Avatar
    Computer Details
    Jack_O'neill's Computer Details
    Operating System:
    xp
    Discipline
    Architectural
    Jack_O'neill's Discipline Details
    Discipline
    Architectural
    Details
    The bulk of my business is commercial curtainwall, site plans and floor plans. I do occasionally get a bit of tool and die, and the odd house now and again.
    Using
    AutoCAD 2010
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    lost in the Arkansas wilderness
    Posts
    2,146

    Default

    Here's one bent round a corner. This uses a twist angle of 1080, or three full turns. The bigger twist angle you use, the more like a helix it looks.
    cable.jpg
    Never try to teach a pig to sing. It wastes your time and annoys the pig. -Robert Heinlein

  6. #6
    Forum Deity Jack_O'neill's Avatar
    Computer Details
    Jack_O'neill's Computer Details
    Operating System:
    xp
    Discipline
    Architectural
    Jack_O'neill's Discipline Details
    Discipline
    Architectural
    Details
    The bulk of my business is commercial curtainwall, site plans and floor plans. I do occasionally get a bit of tool and die, and the odd house now and again.
    Using
    AutoCAD 2010
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    lost in the Arkansas wilderness
    Posts
    2,146

    Default

    Here's a loop with a crimp fitting. "I'm through playin' now" as Minnie Pearl used to say.
    cable.jpg


    --oops...forgot the grommet. oh well--
    Never try to teach a pig to sing. It wastes your time and annoys the pig. -Robert Heinlein

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Computer Details
    danellis's Computer Details
    Operating System:
    Windows 7
    Computer:
    Dell Precision T1650
    Using
    Architecture 2014
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    216

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack_O'neill View Post
    --oops...forgot the grommet. oh well--

    Here'ya go, Jack.wallace and grommit beat NASA.jpg

    dJE

  8. #8
    Forum Deity Jack_O'neill's Avatar
    Computer Details
    Jack_O'neill's Computer Details
    Operating System:
    xp
    Discipline
    Architectural
    Jack_O'neill's Discipline Details
    Discipline
    Architectural
    Details
    The bulk of my business is commercial curtainwall, site plans and floor plans. I do occasionally get a bit of tool and die, and the odd house now and again.
    Using
    AutoCAD 2010
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    lost in the Arkansas wilderness
    Posts
    2,146

    Default



    That's great! Thanks!!
    Never try to teach a pig to sing. It wastes your time and annoys the pig. -Robert Heinlein

  9. #9
    Junior Member Posho91's Avatar
    Using
    AutoCAD 2011
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    18

    Default

    Haha. Thanks jack, sweep and twist seems to work, except that with the size and length of the cables I need autocad is having a hissy fit and crashing whenever I try to manipulate them since it has to recalculate all the twists each time. I think i'll just have to use straight pipes with a texture on them or something

  10. #10
    Forum Deity Jack_O'neill's Avatar
    Computer Details
    Jack_O'neill's Computer Details
    Operating System:
    xp
    Discipline
    Architectural
    Jack_O'neill's Discipline Details
    Discipline
    Architectural
    Details
    The bulk of my business is commercial curtainwall, site plans and floor plans. I do occasionally get a bit of tool and die, and the odd house now and again.
    Using
    AutoCAD 2010
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    lost in the Arkansas wilderness
    Posts
    2,146

    Default

    Registered forum members do not see this ad.

    Quote Originally Posted by Posho91 View Post
    Haha. Thanks jack, sweep and twist seems to work, except that with the size and length of the cables I need autocad is having a hissy fit and crashing whenever I try to manipulate them since it has to recalculate all the twists each time. I think i'll just have to use straight pipes with a texture on them or something
    Yeah, it gets pretty intense mathmatically with all those spirals.
    Never try to teach a pig to sing. It wastes your time and annoys the pig. -Robert Heinlein

Similar Threads

  1. cable markers
    By Electroman7979 in forum Electrical
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 4th Jul 2009, 10:34 pm
  2. Flexible Cable
    By Deadwood in forum Autodesk Inventor
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 14th May 2009, 04:44 am
  3. Help w/Cable Trays!!!
    By ruebdog10 in forum AutoCAD General
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11th Dec 2008, 08:11 pm

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts