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    Default Revit MEP question

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    Hi all
    I would appreciate some input regarding Revit MEP.
    I work for a small company of electrical consultants. Mostly we design low to medium voltage residential and industrial reticulation.
    A typical month of drawings would include site drawings showing electrical reticulation IE light positions, cable routes, kiosk and minisub positions, schematic diagrams, very few isometric type drawings and no 3D work. Its all pretty basic stuff.
    I work as the draughtsperson in the office while the consultants do the design work, none of which is done via any desktop program, its done manually.
    I am not familiar with any of the Autodesk products other than Autocad but have been told that we should possibly look into the Revit MEP package as it may be able to do assist with design work to a degree.
    Now for me as the CAD operator I am perfectly comfortable working on Autocad as I have been as with it I can do all that is required of me very easily, but am enquiring about Revit MEP for 2 reasons.
    Firstly if it will save the bosses time doing designing then better for us, and secondly Im bored stiff doing this basic work on AC and if we moved to Revit it would allow me to become familiar with the program and add some skills.

    So basically Id like to know from those who are familiar with Revit MEP, given the scope of our company is it worth us looking at possibly moving to Revit MEP? Where would the benefit to the company really come in?

    Regards
    Don't forget your towel!

  2. #2
    Senior Member G-Prime's Avatar
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    With the direction that the industry is moving it is worth moving into MEP. That being said, the program is terrible and out of the box capability is pretty much set up for american standards only, since your location says South Africa there will be a period of time, a long period of time that you will be customizing the program to work well for you. We have had this program since 2007, and we find we are still learning new things every day. At this time we do not utilize the program as it was meant to be used, in fact we use it essentially as if it were CAD, we do it this way to familiarize ourselves with the program.

    Our biggest issue even tho we are beside the USA, is the lighting and equipment voltage, where the standard is 277/480, where we use 347/600, so we had to develop our own families for devices if we wanted to utilize the full functionality of Revit.

    Also I believe that the standard receptacle voltage in South Africa is 230, that will be another item as in NA it is 120, so unless they have a special package for Europe/Africa there will be a long set up period.

    Hope this info helps.
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    AutoCAD MEP might be a good choice too. It would be a nice "transition" from AutoCAD, plus preps you for Revit at the same time since AutoCAD MEP gets its intuitive interface from the Revit platform. You have tools like the Circuit Manager which I hear is an awesome tool for electrical designers and engineers. I have no personal experience with it, however.
    Tannar Z. Frampton | Hill & Wilkinson

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    Link to Circuit Manager in AutoCAD MEP 2012 (video): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iKkkZKlW15A
    Tannar Z. Frampton | Hill & Wilkinson

  5. #5
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    Thanks G-Prime that's some good info. I have a feeling we would be trying too hard to validate a migration to Revit and perhaps Autocad MEP as Stykface suggests is a better idea. I've looked at the clip and will show the engineers too.
    Thanks for the input guys, I suspect Ill look more into AC MEP than Revit.
    Don't forget your towel!

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    Quote Originally Posted by MisterJingles View Post
    Thanks G-Prime that's some good info. I have a feeling we would be trying too hard to validate a migration to Revit and perhaps Autocad MEP as Stykface suggests is a better idea. I've looked at the clip and will show the engineers too.
    Thanks for the input guys, I suspect Ill look more into AC MEP than Revit.
    Remember, they offer a "Suite" that has both for practically the same price (only $100 difference in the US if I remember correctly). Just to keep in mind is all.
    Tannar Z. Frampton | Hill & Wilkinson

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    Quote Originally Posted by StykFacE View Post
    Remember, they offer a "Suite" that has both for practically the same price (only $100 difference in the US if I remember correctly). Just to keep in mind is all.
    Don't forget your towel!

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    Adding to that, I think it is a good idea to get Revit training in or something, as I mentioned the industry is moving in that direction, Commercial building wise at least. Keep in mind that I think in a few years the program will be used alot more, as already the USA government requires all consultants to submit their federal buildings projects in Revit I believe is what I heard, can one of my friendly neighbours from the south here confirm that for me?
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    I thought I read all federal projects over a certain dollar amount had to be done in/with BIM. Could BIM include plain AutoCad drawn in 3D? What about Navisworks? I hope so because what I read here I will never learn revit. I don't put in enough time to learn anything more. Right now all that may be required in a (electrical contracting)contract (not federal) is that the coordination drawings be done in 3D with AutoCad version * or later. Can a gatekeeper incorporate an AutoCad drawing into Revit? I don't know what is required of architects and engineers.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by hertz hound View Post
    Could BIM include plain AutoCad drawn in 3D? What about Navisworks?
    Yes, and no. 3D is in fact apart of BIM, but the information is side of things from the intelligent objects inside the 3D model is the other part - which plain AutoCAD can't provide. Not only that, but to create 3D models for a BIM job in plain AutoCAD would be suicide. The reason I say this is with applications like Autodesk Vertical Products and the Revit platforms that give you the specialized design tools to automatically create, edit, and manipulate 3D models that are specific to your trade discipline, it would be completely absurd to not upgrade from plain AutoCAD to one of these applications.

    Quote Originally Posted by hertz hound View Post
    I hope so because what I read here I will never learn revit. I don't put in enough time to learn anything more.
    With a quote like this, you've basically secured your fate. My suggestion is simply to upgrade to an Autodesk Vertical Product (such as AutoCAD Architecture or AutoCAD MEP, for instance). This way it's still AutoCAD, with added functionality to support BIM. The learning curve will be very easy and gradual. But rest assured, Revit will be demanded at some point, especially if you are ever contracted to a local, state, or federal government facility.

    Quote Originally Posted by hertz hound View Post
    Right now all that may be required in a (electrical contracting)contract (not federal) is that the coordination drawings be done in 3D with AutoCad version * or later.
    Once again, I will strongly discourage the use of plain AutoCAD to create electrical BIM models that follow your shop drawings. AutoCAD MEP has extension catalogs of 3D parts and design tools to quickly add things like switchgear, lighting, and other electrical equipment, and you can run 3D conduit with absolute ease. Best thing, they are all intelligent AEC objects that can be manipulated in ways that plain AutoCAD couldn't even dream of, since AEC objects are based on parametric tools and not 3D solid modeling.

    Quote Originally Posted by hertz hound View Post
    Can a gatekeeper incorporate an AutoCad drawing into Revit? I don't know what is required of architects and engineers.
    Technically yes, but they won't do it. A 3D DWG file imported into Revit is such a massive performance hit, it makes Revit basically un-usable, buckling Revit to it's knees crying for mercy. Most standards are an exported IFC file if you're not using a native Revit platform. Then again, if you're on the contracting side of things, most times you'll only deal with the general contractor who utilize Navisworks which a DWG will suffice. But be careful as G.C.'s are now required Revit models for live coordination with the subs since Revit Server has arrived.

    This is all the info I can give you with your requests. If you still have more Q's then post up and I'll answer as best I can. Hope this helps.
    Tannar Z. Frampton | Hill & Wilkinson

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