+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Full Member
    Using
    Inventor 2011
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    27

    Default Best way to set up parameters between 2 models in an assembly?

    Registered forum members do not see this ad.

    Another question:
    I have two models that I placed in an Assembly, and I want the diameter of one model to be "adaptably constrained" to the other's following a simple parameter. For example, if I increase the first model's diameter by "X", I want the second's diameter to increase by "X/2".

    As far as I've experimented, "Adaptive" only works for model features (e.g. extrusions). And I'm not sure what constraint I would use to accomplish the above. Also, though I know how to set basic 'Parameters' in sketches, I don't know how to do so between different models.

    All advice greatly appreciated!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Computer Details
    Bishop's Computer Details
    Operating System:
    Windows 7 Enterprise
    Computer:
    Dell Precision T1600
    CPU:
    Xeon E3-1280
    RAM:
    16 GB
    Graphics:
    Quadro 600 1024 MB
    Primary Storage:
    Seagate 250GB - ST3250312AS
    Secondary Storage:
    Western Digital 1024 GB - External
    Monitor:
    2x Dell P2211H @ 1920 x 1080
    Discipline
    Multi-disciplinary
    Bishop's Discipline Details
    Occupation
    CAD Design, Manufacturing
    Discipline
    Multi-disciplinary
    Using
    Inventor 2013
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Democratic People's Republic of Kalifornia
    Posts
    406

    Default

    You do this in an assembly.

    This morning, for instance, I needed to add a small cast-iron access door into something else. The way that I did this was to create an assembly, and position the small access door (the actual door, I mean) where I wanted it to go on the larger object. Then, editing the larger part while still in the assembly (that part's important), I projected the outline of the access door onto the larger part, then offset it for clearance, and extruded a door-shaped hole into the larger panel. If I make changes to the shape of the access door next week, the hole cut in the panel will automatically update to match the new shape of the door. (Well, usually it will - the connections can be quite fragile, and you don't want to screw them up.)

  3. #3
    Luminous Being JD Mather's Avatar
    Using
    Inventor 2015
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Williamsport, PA
    Posts
    8,515

    Default

    Sketches can be adaptive when using cross-part projection.
    But as a beginner (or even experienced) I suggest you look at muti-body solids techniques. Far easier.
    (see the Vacuum tutorial in my signature)
    Certified SolidWorks Professional
    Autodesk Inventor 2014 Certified Professional
    Autodesk AutoCAD 2013 Certified Professional
    http://home.pct.edu/~jmather/content..._Tutorials.htm

  4. #4
    Super Member Pablo Ferral's Avatar
    Using
    Inventor 2010
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    London
    Posts
    638

    Default

    I wrote this series on the various assembly modelling techniques for Inventor that you might find useful:
    http://cadsetterout.com/inventor-tut...r-woodworkers/

  5. #5
    Full Member
    Using
    Inventor 2011
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    27

    Default

    This is all great-- thank you Bishop, JD Mather, and Pablo. I will check out the tutorial links you sent, see if I understand them. I will also try what you suggested, Bishop-- creating and editing parts while in Assembly mode...

  6. #6
    Full Member
    Using
    Inventor 2011
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Hi Bishop,

    I tried this approach but could not get it to work. Just to make sure I understand:
    I bring my 2 parts into an Assembly. While still in Assembly, I can edit Part 1, using projections of Part 2 to do so. Then, if I modify the Sketch of Part 2 (adjusting size), Part 1 should update accordingly (if the sketch I modified was involved in the projection).

    Is this right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bishop View Post
    You do this in an assembly.

    This morning, for instance, I needed to add a small cast-iron access door into something else. The way that I did this was to create an assembly, and position the small access door (the actual door, I mean) where I wanted it to go on the larger object. Then, editing the larger part while still in the assembly (that part's important), I projected the outline of the access door onto the larger part, then offset it for clearance, and extruded a door-shaped hole into the larger panel. If I make changes to the shape of the access door next week, the hole cut in the panel will automatically update to match the new shape of the door. (Well, usually it will - the connections can be quite fragile, and you don't want to screw them up.)

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Computer Details
    Bishop's Computer Details
    Operating System:
    Windows 7 Enterprise
    Computer:
    Dell Precision T1600
    CPU:
    Xeon E3-1280
    RAM:
    16 GB
    Graphics:
    Quadro 600 1024 MB
    Primary Storage:
    Seagate 250GB - ST3250312AS
    Secondary Storage:
    Western Digital 1024 GB - External
    Monitor:
    2x Dell P2211H @ 1920 x 1080
    Discipline
    Multi-disciplinary
    Bishop's Discipline Details
    Occupation
    CAD Design, Manufacturing
    Discipline
    Multi-disciplinary
    Using
    Inventor 2013
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Democratic People's Republic of Kalifornia
    Posts
    406

    Default

    Take a look at the files I've attached here.

    Open up the assembly (adaptive.iam), and you'll see two blocks. The larger one is Part1.ipt, the smaller flattish one is Part2.ipt.

    If you look at Part2, you'll notice there's a little blue / red thing with arrows in a circle next to the name in the browser. This means that it's adaptive. If you look at the sketch used to create it, you'll see that I projected the face of Part1 that it's sitting on, then offset it smaller by 1 inch.

    Now, go to Part1, and change the length of the extrusion from 6 to ... 8 or 9 should work out okay. Return to the top. You should see that Part2 changed as well, because the projected geometry in the sketch stayed with what it was projected from, and since everything was based on that ... voila.

    If you don't see the changes right away when you Return to Top, you might have to click "Rebuild All" on the Manage tab.


    adaptive.zip

  8. #8
    Full Member
    Using
    Inventor 2011
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    27

    Default

    This is great, Bishop--I actually figured it out after I sent you the help request, and your method did, indeed, work. So thank you!
    But I can't apply it to the particular project I'm working on:

    I am building an Assembly. The Assembly includes several parabolic parts that are constrained (using "Insert" constraint) into a cylindrical housing part. Each part was a separate file placed into the Assembly , and each was Inserted one by one into the next. The parts themselves are underconstrained-- they can be 'adaptive'.
    So the question is: Can I set up a relationship (in Assembly mode) where if I change the diameter of the cylindrical housing, the diameters of each of the parabolic parts change accordingly (or vice versa)?

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Computer Details
    Bishop's Computer Details
    Operating System:
    Windows 7 Enterprise
    Computer:
    Dell Precision T1600
    CPU:
    Xeon E3-1280
    RAM:
    16 GB
    Graphics:
    Quadro 600 1024 MB
    Primary Storage:
    Seagate 250GB - ST3250312AS
    Secondary Storage:
    Western Digital 1024 GB - External
    Monitor:
    2x Dell P2211H @ 1920 x 1080
    Discipline
    Multi-disciplinary
    Bishop's Discipline Details
    Occupation
    CAD Design, Manufacturing
    Discipline
    Multi-disciplinary
    Using
    Inventor 2013
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Democratic People's Republic of Kalifornia
    Posts
    406

    Default

    Registered forum members do not see this ad.

    If you open up the parameters window, there's a button at the bottom that says LINK. You can use this to link your parameters to another file. That said, I haven't actually used it much, so I'm a little rough on the step-by-step. You should be able to figure it out, though.

Similar Threads

  1. Converting SolidWorks models to AutoCAD solid models
    By Patrick Hughes in forum Tutorials & Tips'n'Tricks
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 9th May 2012, 06:47 pm
  2. Linking constraint parameters to action parameters?
    By Lagviper in forum AutoCAD Beginners' Area
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 21st Sep 2011, 05:46 pm
  3. Match sub assembly base parameters
    By cadjunkee in forum Civil 3D & LDD
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 8th Aug 2011, 12:48 am
  4. How to put 3D models together in an assembly?
    By jbird68 in forum AutoCAD 3D Modelling & Rendering
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 6th Aug 2010, 01:11 pm
  5. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 3rd Oct 2009, 05:42 pm

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts