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Thread: 1" = 100'

  1. #11
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    Super, thanks ReMark. I didn't quite get 1320", I got 1319'5" instead. Cant get my snap to work so I can snap directly on the line, but .5" away isn't bad. I increased my linear dimension text size to 80.0 and that seems to work ok. Also, I created a layer named "Factory Boundary", I already know about putting everything on the 0 layer...found out that mistake the hard way. Next up, the 60' x 40' grid. I'll suppose I'll create another layer for this as well.
    Thanks for the help.

  2. #12
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    Do you want this to be as accurate a drawing as possible or not? If your motto is "It's just not good, it's good enough" then stop using CAD and get out a pen and a cocktail napkin.

    Turn off SNAP. Turn off GRID. You do not need them.

    There is no need for you to be adding dimensions so early. As a matter of fact by adding them now you may end up regretting it later. Do you know anything about Annotative Scaling as it applies to text and dimensions? Do you know anything about Associative dimensions? What about Layouts? Viewports? Do you know how to assign a scale to a viewport?
    Last edited by ReMark; 18th Oct 2012 at 10:49 am.
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  3. #13
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    Use 'Osnap' not 'Snap'. Two different things. Have a google on osnap....you can snap to endpoints, centres, mid points etc etc

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    Well, I suppose I could answer with a smart A** remark, but that wouldn't be prudent, especially since you're taking the time to help. Thank you for your time.
    I put dimensions in to verify if the drawing was accurate...sort of. I am a perfectionist at things, so that is why I was trying to use the snap function, so I could get directly on the line when I took my dimension. To answer all your other questions: Nope, that's why I'm in the beginners section...I'm really good in C++ and Java, will that help?
    So much for not giving a Smart A** remark.
    By the way, I'm not using AutoCAD, I don't have the money for that. I'm using a free CAD called Draft Sight, which so far as basically the same commands as AutoCAD.
    Thanks for the help

  5. #15
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    I don't hold back and you don't have to either. I tell it like it is which has earned me the reputation as a hard a$$ but I figure either a person takes this seriously or they go out and buy an Etch-a-Sketch for all the good it will do.

    I have Draftsight loaded as well so I can reference it when required. You're right re: basically the same commands as AutoCAD.

    C++ and Java won't do much for getting your drawing done so you can put those skills aside for the moment.

    So what's the deal? Are we going to create a good, accurate drawing that can be printed to a recognizable and useable scale or are we going to wing it?
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  6. #16
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    The new rule-of-thumb when using AutoCAD is to draw all your model space objects at FULL size. It doesn't matter if you are drawing a half inch long brad or the world's lonest suspension bridge. It doesn't matter if you are drawing a paper clip or a Boeing 777 Dreamliner. FULL size. When done we switch to a paper space layout. Layouts are used for our title block and border. They are also where we create Viewports. What is a viewport? A viewport is a window that allows us to see the objects we created back in model space. We assign a scale to the viewport and not to the objects in model space. There are many other things you should know about viewports but we'll skip that for a moment.

    When it comes to text and dimensions they can be put in model space or in paper space. Each method has its own pros and cons. If you are going to put these entities in model space then it would be a good idea to use a feature called Annotative Scaling which will ensure that when you plot from your layout, all text and dimensions will be properly sized no matter what the scale assigned to the viewport. If you are going to put text and dimensions in your layout they are created at real world sizes. And as far as dimensioning goes it is critical that the user has enabled Associative dimensioning which will ensure your dimensions accurately reflect the true size of the objects back in model space.

    When all is said and done we plot from our Layout at a scale of 1:1. AutoCAD will automatically see that the contents of our viewports are printed to the scale assigned to the them.

    For accuracy you should become familiar with OSnaps and how they are used. Typical OSnaps are Endpoint, Midpoint, Intersection, Parallel, Perpendicular, Quadrant and Center just to name a few. Orthomode will make sure all vertical lines and all horizontal lines are straight and true.

    I suggest that you go through some of the tutorials here at CADTutor since most of these commands have their counterpart in Draftsight. Did you download the Draftsight manual (it is a PDF)?
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  7. #17
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    You Betcha...I like the accurate part. Actually, I just found On Snaps, which is E-Snaps in DraftSight. I exploded the rectangle, so I could get my line points, and now the snap command works and my rectangle is 1320' x 852'8"! I've now deleted that dimension. I've watched some tutorials about paperspace and veiwports, etc... I have two "Sheets" sheet 1 & sheet 2. When I click on either sheet, my picture comes up and looks like it is defined in a printout look. I'm guessing this is paper-space, and this is where I print from? Also, can I color the sheet tabs different colors like in excel?
    Thanks for the help

    PS. never mind about my questions with paperspace, etc...I just read the last reply you sent. I have the DraftSight PDF Guide, maybe I should read that first; then again, that would probably be the logical thing to do and as a man, I'm not required to read the directions first. That comes after the cussing.

  8. #18
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    Directions are for wussies. Real men don't need no stinkin' directions!

    Alright, so now that we are literally on the same page what do you want to do here? Tell us exactly what you'll be drawing. How detailed are you going to make this drawing?

    Your thread title of 1"=100' makes me wonder if you plan on printing this drawing to an 11x17 paper size. BTW...that scale would be known as an engineering scale as opposed to an architectural scale like 1/8"=1'-0". Plot plans and site plans are typically draw to engineering scale while floor plans and elevations would typically be drawn to an architectural scale. It all depends on what the drawing is going to be used for.

    Will you also be drawing the piece of property the building sits on?

    I'll have to brush up on Draftsight myself but you are right re: Sheet tab. It is the equivalent of a Layout in AutoCAD. That "frame" in which you see your model space objects would be a viewport. That is what a scale is assigned to. Speaking of viewports you should check out this link as it will come in handy later on down the road:

    http://www.cadtutor.net/forum/showth...ight=viewports

    BTW...you'll find that you will be using your Modify commands (Copy, Stretch, Mirror, Move, Break, Trim, Extend, Erase, Fillet, Offset, Rotate, Hatch, etc.) more than your Draw commands (Line, Circle, Arc, Rectangle, Polygon, etc.). It's the nature of the beast. Get familiar with the Function Keys too especially the ones that enable/disable Orthomode, OSnaps, and the Text window just to name a few. And finally there are the Command Aliases, one or two key "shortcuts" that let us invoke a command quickly from our keyboard.

    Got all that or do we need to slow up a bit?

    I know I have thrown a lot of information at you but I think you are smart enough and quick enough to adsorb it all. Am I right?

    One last question. What is this drawing going to be used for?
    Last edited by ReMark; 18th Oct 2012 at 11:37 am.
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  9. #19
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    OK...Here it goes...
    I need to learn a little bit (I stress little bit because I know people who have 20+ years working CAD, and I don't have that much time) about AutoCAD because of a new project assigned to me at work. I'd rather not name the company, although it is a very large company on a global scale, sorry. At work, I currently have AutoCAD 2010, AutoCAD LT 2012, and FactoryCAD 2012 installed on my machine. The AutoCAD LT is a back up due to my computer crashing with 2010, something about the NVIDEA card...that's a long story which the IT department would rather not be reminded about. They worked on the problem a long time, spent a lot of money basically rebuilding the machine, and finally just said: "screw it, we'll just give you FactoryCAD 2012, and be done with it"...which actually works quite nice.
    Instead of lugging my work laptop home, to connect to the work network VPN, I would rather practice on my own computers, at home (or anywhere) without concern for loosing/breaking/the large size of the work laptop/ having to mess with the hassles which come with having a work laptop, did I mention the size of this monster, it's huge! and I usually buy another seat for it when I need to travel to other facilities; it's a hassle lugging it around. I'd rather just keep it at my desk. Therefore, because DraftSight is very similar to AutoCAD, I figure the more practice I get, the better I'll be at this new project which was assigned to me. The company I work for does have training classes for AutoCAD; however, a certain number of people must register for the class to take place, which I have not gotten the required amount of people yet. Because I must refer to facility layouts designed in AutoCAD, I am picking it up quickly. However, I've found out in the past, that with large, complicated programs, it's easy to pick up bad habits. Therefore, the community I'm currently using (you and others), will hopefully teach me procedures, to avert bad habits.
    Now, the factory I'm drawing (we'll say is fictitious), is a very large factory, which has multiple assembly lines, work cells, painting areas, test areas, labs and quality areas, machining centers, and large heat treating areas, not to mention office space, employee personnel spaces, cafeterias, lockers, restrooms, storm shelters, bla-bla-bla...
    So, it's definitely not feasible to recreate the entire factory; therefore, I would like to be able to create a fictions factory, set the factory boundaries, make an assembly line, maybe put a few fork lift isle lanes in, build a library of objects and learn how to build assembly lines with my objects I create (desk, conveyors, overhead cranes, etc...). I figure if I can create assembly lines here and there by sectioning off various areas of my factory, it will really jump start my learning for work, and make me that much more dangerous. The sooner I learn this stuff, the better position I'll be in to really mess things up!
    My fictitious factory is 1320' by 852'8" (which is a little small compared to the original), and has a nice rectangle shape (which is sort of like the original, only with other buildings kind of glued on to the sides over the years as need be). The column spacing of 60' x 40' is correct for the original factory. All the manufacturing areas of the original factory must "fit" inside the Damn columns; therefore, I've been told by people at work, to always set your grid to reflect your factory columns, or you'll be hating life. So, I would like to make a column grid, with little I-Beam objects at each cross section, and begin to build one assembly line (and only one) with objects I create in my library. In addition, I would like to have a scale where 1" = 100', and lets put a revision block somewhere for good measure. As stated, I only wish to build one assembly line in this drawing (due to time constraints). I figure if I can design one assembly line, I'll learn enough to do other things.
    I do have a wealth of information available to me for learning through the factory Drafting team at work; however, I don't want to appear like I know nothing about AutoCAD (which they already know anyway...it's a great company)! At any rate, the more I learn the better I'll be. And you are correct, I'll probably print on 17 x 11, although I do have plotter capabilities at work, and I currently am printing CAD files at work for myself and others, so I am familiar with the printing/plotting part of it.
    That's a lot to throw at you (boomerang effect) where are we supposed to start?
    Thanks

  10. #20
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    I'm of no help to you if you are going to do this with FactoryCAD. Sorry. I have no familiarity with the program what-so-ever.

    As far as the general concept of your factory goes I think I could help you there. The column grid line is something I have used in the past when we have made additions to our facility (a chemical manufacturing plant). The I-beam objects, as you call them, of course are columns usually mounted on a baseplates. I have no idea how to build/draw an assembly line. If you were using AutoCAD or Draftsight the objects needed to populate your building would be created as blocks which is more efficient since they can be used in other drawings at a future date. Never draw the same thing twice in two different drawings.

    Do not worry about scale until it is time to set up your sheet (Layout). Draw everything FULL size. I cannot stress that often enough. Don't worry that it won't fit on an 11x17 as that's where viewports come into play. Heck, if I had to I could draw the world's tallest building and print out (to scale) on nothing bigger than a credit card size piece of paper (you'll need a magnifying glass just to view it though).

    Not sure if any of this helps or not. Don't be afraid to tell me to take a hike. I'll understand. No problemo dude.
    Last edited by ReMark; 18th Oct 2012 at 07:11 pm.
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    Eat brains...gain more knowledge!

    I'm now a full member of the Society for the Promotion of Mediocrity in CAD. Standards? We don't need no stinkin' standards! Take whatever advice I offer and do the opposite.

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