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  1. #1
    Super Member Pablo Ferral's Avatar
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    Default Do you review drawings? what does a good set of drawings look like to you?

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    This goes out to Architects, Engineers and designers who review drawings from other companies - eg. Contractors, sub-contractors, manufacturers and the like.

    What fills you full of joy when you open a set of drawings? What fills you full of dread!

    Id really love to get your feedback on what you look for in a set of submittal drawings.

    Thanks in advance for your time.

    Paul

  2. #2
    Forum Deity Organic's Avatar
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    When reviewing we don't often get drawing files and it is normally printed plans or pdfs.

    The scale. If the scale is too large to read anything on the plan then it is useless.

    I was sent a drawing the other day that was a single A2 sheet of paper (which is an unusual sheet size for what this was of) and had a scale of 1:5000 or something ridiculous like that and they'd obviously done all their annotation in modelspace (no annotative scaling) so then in their 'final' plan the text was about half a mm high and totally unreadable. The drawing should have been split over several sheets at smaller scales so that is is actually readable although their drafting department is either really crap or just plain dodgy trying to cut corners and time. We sent it back to them.

    Another thing that annoys me is when someone does something really well, then in other aspects of the design it is substantially lacking. Yes, it is great that you done component A really detailed and the design does look good. So why the heck didn't you list any design data at all (no levels, grades, sizes, anything etc) for component B which is just as important on your construction documents?

    If you specify that X is required to be satisfied in your design then clearly show elsewhere on the plans that X is not satisfied, well... (which only came across my desk after it was already approved and had been constructed and no one had picked up on it yet).

    I like plans that have good legends, scales and follows common industry practices somewhat.

    Don't use comic sans as a font.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator SLW210's Avatar
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    Needed Information/Diminsions/Details etc., Proper Scale, Neatness/Readability and good use of Layers.
    “A narrow mind and a fat head invariably come on the same person” Zig Zigler



  4. #4
    Senior Member jmerch's Avatar
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    Flipping the roles here, as a contractor the main thing I like to see from engineers/architects is a design that works I'm not one of these "engineers don't know what they're doing" type of guys b/c I used to work at a consulting engineering firm. I understand where they come from. But WOW, I can only defend them so many times. Engineers out there, please check your design with structural, we're getting tired of having to move plumbing drops to a fixture b/c it's placed right above a beam. I realize the architect places these most of the time, but the engineer should still catch it.

    And now that we're in the age of 3D and clash detection, don't give me a Revit model, tell me you coordinated it, and that we don't need to coordinate it. Really? See comment above about plumbing running in structural.

    Details, I understand probably 90% of typical details are just that, TYPICAL. But if you want to deviate from that in a certain location, please note that. And, make sure your typical details are even applicable to the job and that there is only one. I've seen jobs with 3 different details for the exact same application that occurs once on a job. This causes confusion, questions, and possibly added cost depending on who the contractor is.

    I don't want to banter on, that's just what I dread. As far as text, notes, etc. I agree that it should be clean and readable, that's common sense stuff.

  5. #5
    Senior Member pqphillips's Avatar
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    Let's see, when I review drawings, I look for the usual: Proper scale, text size, font, layers, blocks when they are supposed to be blocks, constructability, continuity from one drawing to the next, neatness, etc.

    There's something else I look for as well. Artistry.

    A good set of drawings should be considered a work of art. Your design, lineweights, text sizes, fonts, etc should all come together in such a way as to be aesthetically pleasing, which in turn makes the drawings easy to read.

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    Super Member Pablo Ferral's Avatar
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    This is great stuff guys - thanks for taking the time to post

    'Don't use Comic sans as a font'
    There's one we can all agree on

    So, to round it up so far:
    1. Hand in the complete set of drawings.
    2. Don't cut corners when it comes to laying up sheets.
    3. Consider the presentation of your drawings, as well as the information they contain.

    In the interests of keeping the conversation rolling, how do you like the drawings to be presented to you?

    Do you like to receive the drawings well ahead of any meeting with the contractor?
    Do you like to have the drawings presented by the contractor, and then have time to take them away and review them?
    Would you rather just have the drawings emailed to you?

    I will be compiling your advice into a blog post, which you can see here:
    http://cadsetterout.com/personal-pos...view-drawings/

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    Forum Deity Organic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmerch View Post
    Details, I understand probably 90% of typical details are just that, TYPICAL. But if you want to deviate from that in a certain location, please note that. And, make sure your typical details are even applicable to the job and that there is only one. I've seen jobs with 3 different details for the exact same application that occurs once on a job. This causes confusion, questions, and possibly added cost depending on who the contractor is.
    This is a good one.

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    Senior Member pqphillips's Avatar
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    In addition to Comic Sans, do not use txt.shx font.

    It's ugly and blocky.

    Mankind is naturally drawn to curved shapes. Blocky text goes against this.

    Instead, use RomanS or Arial for text within the drawing and smaller text within the titleblock, and RomanT or Arial Bold for the prominent text in a title block.

    Really any sans-serif font will work for small text and any serif or bold text for large text, but the ones listed either come with CAD, or with a computer's basic font package.

    I guess what I am trying to say is not to use any off-the-wall fonts in the drawing so that anyone can read them.


    As to the presentation question: I want enough time to at least get a general idea of what is going on before a meeting.

  9. #9
    Senior Member pqphillips's Avatar
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    Oh, another issue: Block size.

    A block, no matter what it is, should not overpower the rest of the drawing. Some blocks will, mainly due to the complexity of them, and I'm not talking about them.

    I'm talking about someone creating an attributed block where the text is 1/2" tall (proportionately) and bigger. There's no need for that, and it's garish and stupid.

  10. #10
    Forum Deity Organic's Avatar
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    Default Re: Do you review drawings? what does a good set of drawings look like to you?

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    Blocks should be to scale. Don't show It half a metre wide if it is 2m wide. Showing to scale allows easier clash detection etc.

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