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    Default Sheet Metal Cylinder - "Creating" & "Flatten" Question

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    I need to create a cylinder that is 30"Ø, 36.00" tall, with a wall thickness of 0.25".
    I don't see where to set the wall thickness.





    Here is the procedure I followed:
    • Start a new part;
    • Go to SHEET METAL > BASE FLANGE/TAB;
    • Select the Top Plane;
    • Select CIRCLE;
    • Create a circle that is 30.00"Ø,
    • Exit SKETCH;
    • For Sheet Metal Parameters, I enter 36.00" to make the cylinder height 36.00";
    This is where I get confused.
    I do not know what the K-Factor & the Auto Relief are, or what they do.

    I do not see where I would specify that the wall thickness should be 0.25".

    Am I supposed to specify the wall thickness on this page, or is there another place to place that dimension?

    ******************************

    Once this cylinder is created, I also need to be able to unfold (or flatten) it.

    Sheet Metal Cylinder.jpg

    Is there a better way to create this cylinder, that will allow me to FLATTEN it?

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    Default

    I found a way to create the cylinder, but I don't know if this is the correct way to do it.

    I sketched a circle that was 30.00"Ø.

    Then, I trimmed out 1/8" out of the circumference of the circle, so that, now the circle was not a complete circle.
    I then went to SHEET METAL, and created the 36" tall cylinder, with a 0.25" wall thickness.

    Circle Split.jpg

    The cylinder will now FLATTEN, and UNFLATTEN.
    I just have to remember that when I need to know the length of the cylinder, when it's flattened, I have to ADD the 1/8" that I originally removed from the circle.

    Cirle Split - End Results.jpg

    This is the end result.

    If this is NOT the correct method, someone please let me know.
    Last edited by vertical horizons; 9th Jan 2014 at 10:46 pm. Reason: Adding Images For Clarity

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    Default

    Actually, I was just informed that, when they construct a cylinder, they will roll the steel to where the 2 ends almost meet, leaving the 2 ends 1/8" apart from each other, to allow for welding. So, I guess, until someone shows me a better way to create a cylinder, this way will have to do.

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    Default

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    Hi Vert,
    Unfortunately, this is the correct way to do a rolled cylinder in Solidworks (e.g. creating a circle and breaking it at a point.

    The exact K-Factor is dependent to your Brake Press tooling and forming methods. It may vary from company to company and machine manufacturer. I'll try and give the layman's terms.

    K-Factor is the expression given to the to point in the thickness of the material where there is no-compression. the k-factor itself relates to a percentage of the thickness of the material:
    e.g. 44% = 0.44, 50% = 0.50 etc.etc

    This percentage is taken from the inside radii when formed.

    Generally material under 3mm has a k-factor of 0.44 but then again this depends on the material used (alloy, M/S or St/St)

    http://sheetmetal.me/k-factor/

    http://designandmotion.net/design-2/...etal-k-factor/
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