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  1. #1
    Senior Member khoshravan's Avatar
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    Default wipeout command vs turn off layer

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    Today I met the "wipeout" command for the first time in draw area.
    I want to know where do you use it and when or where it will show its benefits.
    Also in my own way of working, if I want to hide something or not print it, usually I turnoff the containing layer. Is it better to use wipeout, instead?
    What is the difference between wipeout and turn off layer?

  2. #2
    Luminous Being dbroada's Avatar
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    a lot of people here don't like wipeouts especially as some print drivers render them black.

    I do use wipeouts though. I often build them into my mecahical blocks so that I can build my general arrangements a layer at a time and you see the finished product.

    Here is an example. The yellow cross bar is a often repeated block. From the left, the swing frame & themostat have wipeouts in them, the trunking & terminal rail don't. I can move the thermostat to any position I like and it will still hide the cross bar but the cross bar will repair itself as the thermostat is moved away.



    wipeout.jpgThe disadvantage of this approach is you have to regularly adjust the draw order but that is an acceptable price for the speed gain in using this approach.
    "That's it. It's one thing for a ghost to terrorize my children, but quite another for him to play my Theremin." Homer Simpson
    "Everything in drafting is logical. Except what isn’t." - Gavin Guile. (from the Lightbringer series of books by Brent Weeks)

    Dave

  3. #3
    Forum Deity Organic's Avatar
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    My advice would be to not use wipeouts at all. They are a lot more trouble than they are worth.

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    Luminous Being RobDraw's Avatar
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    Just like almost everything, wipeouts have their place. The key is to know where their shortcomings are. dbroada gives a fine example of what a wipeout can be used for. That's about the only place that I find using them is worth the occasional display order fix. I was very happy when a background mask could be applied to text, eliminating using wipeouts to block linework behind text.
    Drafting is a breeze.

  5. #5
    Senior Member khoshravan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbroada View Post
    Here is an example. The yellow cross bar is a often repeated block. From the left, the swing frame & themostat have wipeouts in them, the trunking & terminal rail don't. I can move the thermostat to any position I like and it will still hide the cross bar but the cross bar will repair itself as the thermostat is moved away.
    Dear dbroada
    Thanks for your but I couldn't get the point in your reply.
    If thermostat is wiped out, then how can you move it? Especially if it is wiped out, then how can you select it?
    How the cross bar will repair it? Will you apply regen command to get the result?
    Overall what is the benefit of wiping out thermostat? You mentioned gaining speed. What speed do you get using wipeout.
    Sorry if the questions sounds stupid to you.

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    Luminous Being tzframpton's Avatar
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    Instead of using WIPEOUT, use a Solid Hatch, and apply a True Color of 255,255,255 which will "mask" anything behind it when you plot. Or, select a Color on your CTB Plot Style Table and set the screening to 0% and it will have the same effect no matter what color is applied to it. So for instance, whatever color your drawing canvas is set to you can apply to the Solid Hatch so it doesn't appear at all but when you mouse over it it'll highlight.

    WIPEOUT is a raster image of some sorts and it bloats the file, they cause errors and will eventually give you troubles when printing to a plotter or PDF. Most people stay away from them at all costs nowadays. Good concept by the AutoCAD team but wasn't well executed.
    Tannar Z. Frampton ™ | Frampton & Associates, Inc.

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    Luminous Being dbroada's Avatar
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    the thermostat is a block comprising a wipeout and the lines. The wipeout is placed below the lines. When it is inserted on another item it hides what is behind. In the picture attached you can see the hole pattern is hidden by the thermostat.
    "That's it. It's one thing for a ghost to terrorize my children, but quite another for him to play my Theremin." Homer Simpson
    "Everything in drafting is logical. Except what isn’t." - Gavin Guile. (from the Lightbringer series of books by Brent Weeks)

    Dave

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