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Mason Dixon

Need Help with 3 things...

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ReMark

JDM: Unfortunately I was not in a position to download, unzip and view your files. I'm on a friend's laptop at the moment trying to help him out with a Win7 problem. I pop over here in between installing updates and drivers.

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JD Mather

Mason Dixon,

 

Here is another example - I have a 3D polyline for the sweep path.

 

Create a library of sweep profiles and end treatements.

 

In the attached example I have placed one end treatement and the second copy is about to be placed. Simply use the align or 3dalign command to put it on the end (circle center to circle center is convenient for 2 of the 3 points needed.)

 

If you need to separate the parts at the joints simply use the Slice command electing to keep both sides.

 

If you do a lot of this type of work it is worth the time to spend a day creating a library of profiles and end treatments. If you have 2010 or later I recommend creating the profiles with paramtric dimensions if there are a lot of sizes of same basic shape.

nother example.zip

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MikeScott

ok.. so what I'm seeing here are redrawing partial profiles and extruding along paths around corners, instead of two slices, and two mirrors.

 

As far as I can tell, my way is still faster and more efficient, at least in my opinion, where you already have the molding created. I do this kinda stuff with more "involved" profiles all the time.. it handles the entire profile, rather than just portions of it.

 

I CAN see where it'd be faster to just do the whole thing in the method suggested, assuming you had the positional math ready, but just to fix existing ends and stuff, it seems like a lot of hoops to jump through.

 

Any reason why this "easy" method you're presenting, wouldn't have also handled the angular part at the top of the profile at the same time, instead of getting the poster to first slice/press-pull/whatever that part and THEN do this?

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ReMark

And I'd say you're way is not faster unless we were talking about fixing one corner.

 

I think a couple of the methods covered here would build the entire sloped roof box with side mounted semi-circular trim on it a lot faster than your method.

 

They say seeing is believing. So, why don't you draw it out step-by-step and include any explanatory text you feel necessary. Maybe we're just not getting seeing it from your point of view as clearly. Thanks.

 

And can you have it in the next 15-20 minutes? I'd like to go to lunch soon. Much appreciated.

 

The clock starts.....now. 12:22 p.m. EDST

 

7 minutes have elapsed. No drawing submitted.

 

17 minutes have elapsed (12:39 p.m.). Still no drawing.

 

Sorry there Mike but by my clock it is 12:49 p.m. and you failed to post a drawing.

 

It shouldn't take more than 7 minutes to do in my estimation.

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JD Mather

Who is responding to who? And what happened to the OP?

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ReMark

Sorry.

 

ReMark is responding to MikeScott.

 

Mike: Please limit the steps to the fewest required too. Thanks.

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Cad64

It shouldn't take more than 7 minutes to do in my estimation.

 

7 minutes is being generous. I just did it in 3 minutes, although I didn't slice the angle.

 

Just draw the profile, draw the path and then Sweep. It's all automatic.

sweep.jpg

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ReMark

You almost have it there but the original image had a rectangular box with the top sloped not only to the sides but to the ends as well. I'll give you 1 more minute. LOL

 

Yeah, I agree...7 minutes is generous. I'm thinking more like 4 or 5 tops.

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MikeScott

lol.. I wasn't here, I was at lunch.

 

Like I said, I agree that if doing the whole thing from scratch, the other way is quicker. My steps for for taking an existing end and adjusting it (like the OP had in-front of them, per their photograph.)

 

Two slices, a mirror, then union. I'll do it later if you want, but I'm kinda tied up right now, playing catch-up and sneaking some internet time while rendering on both computers.

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ReMark

Yeah, it's the old "I was at lunch" excuse. Not to be confused with "I was out to lunch on that one" right? LOL

 

Yeah Mike I see now where you were coming from. My bad. I'll let you skip on the drawing for this one! LOL

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Mason Dixon

How do I get the get the green/red/blue arrows and the 3dcube(upper right) to show in autocad?

 

ucs2.jpg

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ReMark

The "arrows" are your UCS icon. UCSicon > On.

 

Navvcube > On for the other.

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JD Mather

...and shademode in one of the 3d options.

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MikeScott

I didn't see you were letting me off the hook on this.. so I did pics this morning before work. :)

 

Maybe it's not usefull to someone with a fully preplanned handrail (or piece of molding), but if you're ever stuck with a deadend, it'll get you through it. I'm still having trouble preplanning the ends while extruding, so I'd still rely on this to finish-up the ends, personally.

 

Sorry about the picture sizes.. I didn't have time to make it nice. Guess I should've put borders on the pics too.. to make it easier to read where each picture begins and ends.

 

The first pic is simply the starting point picture, and the last picture shows it unioned. The commands used are visible in the command window. I hope it makes sense... I thought that the way the images were posted, it'd permit me to add comments between each one, but apparently not. :)

 

*Edit*

The first arrow is pointing at the endpoint used as a starting position for the line. (forgot to note it)

 

UCS is set to World, and the View is set at Isometric SW..

Image1.jpg

Image2.jpg

Image3.jpg

Image4.jpg

Image5.jpg

Image6.jpg

Image7.jpg

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ReMark

You put yourself on the hook...you get yourself off.

 

I don't know why you would have a problem with pre-planning the ends. I'd create a library of typical end pieces (with returns) that I could just attach to a straight run. Call it run and done. :lol:

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MikeScott

I use custom molding profiles as provided by architects as a large part of what I do, but even if I could simply use premade molding endings, there are an awful lot of existing options out there for them to select from.

 

Most architects have a tendency to use a regular stick of molding and want us to combine it to a new profile and tell us that a seam is not permitted. The molding is typically selected from a catalog that's local to them, or sometimes we even get the direction to match a profile they have on-site that was installed like 50 years ago with no idea of it's origin.

 

So on these "handrail backers" I have to make my own ends. I think my steps at least indicate that it's not a very involved process.. but the earlier mention was to how easy it'd be to do that, and I wondered if there was an even quicker way I'd been overlooking.

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ReMark

Quicker way? Since you would have to create the profile anyway why couldn't you just sweep it along a guide and make like an end cap? Use Move Faces to shorten the end of the handrail backer add the newly created end piece and union everything together.

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MikeScott

Because I can't sweep on this version (2004). However, even if I could, unless I cut the profile in half and somehow got it to make a 180 degree turn with a squared edge and come back, it won't create the endcap if the profile has a peaked top.

 

Kencaz's example only works because the center of the molding is flat in his example (and mine). Ken followed the block with his guide, but if that were a peak, they'd have to create it seperately with presspull or something, and THEN apply the partial profile thing. That's because you can't sweep in a straight line with one point pivoting, like the topmost point would have to do.

 

If it were peaked, like the Submitter's version, my method would still work, but the kencaz method would require you make that peaked portion seperately.

 

Now.. the Sweep would be great for turning corners and doing the overall primary handrail, but I don't see how you'd get the double-Miter required to begin/end the piece solely using sweep on even multiple partial profiles.

 

It's all good though, if there isn't a way, mine will continue to work for me.

 

Actually, I just figured-out a way to speed that up.. mirror the handrail, rotate it 90-degrees, and use the interfere command. BLAM! that would make a 4-way endcap that can be unioned-on wherever you need it.

 

Sure beats going back to sweeping partial profiles and/or making slices, and yet would still work with a peaked top. Thanks for the exercise. :)

Image8.jpg

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