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Tiger

Flat Pattern in AutoCAD?

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Tiger

Hey folks,

 

A mate of mine has gotten in his head that he wants to weld a boat.

 

yeah I know, very hard, has to know how to weld (and in aluminuim which we have learnt is not easy) and yada yada. But if we remove all those obstacles, the thing that he's concerned with right now is how to do drawings for it.

 

I have recommended that he explores Inventor and the Flat Pattern function which to me seems like the best way to go to get the pieces of the boat the right shape and size.

 

But he doesn't know Inventor, he knows AutoCAD though and now the question is if there is anyway to do the Flat Pattern-thng in AutoCAD. Or how would You go about drawing an aluminium boat in AutoCAD - and how would You get the drawings out of it?

 

A loose question I know, and I expect more along the lines of ramblings than answers - but it's ok, we are all rambling here anyway :)

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MSasu
Or how would You go about drawing an aluminium boat in AutoCAD - and how would You get the drawings out of it?

 

Check which formats is AutoCAD able to export, respectively Inventor able to import. Maybe will find one supported by both.

 

Regards,

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Tiger
Check which formats is AutoCAD able to export, respectively Inventor able to import. Maybe will find one supported by both.

 

Regards,

 

The thing is he doesn't want to use Inventor, he knows AutoCAD so it would be easier if he could do this all in AutoCAD... but I have no idea how he would go about doing it :(

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ReMark

Will he bending pieces?

 

I've had our fabrication shop weld up aluminum ladders and frames once in a while. The shapes used are similar to steel and they use of combination of fillet and full penetration welds.

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Tiger

The actual welding I have no idea about, there's been a lot of mig and mag and tig thrown around - I am more consulting on the CADding part of the project.

 

The pieces will probably have to be bent. after all the boat is round-ish-ed. And that is the problem - if you do a 3D-model, while difficult (at least for me) is not the problem, the problem is to present the 3D-model in such a way, divided into parts that they can be cut.

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ReMark

I've dealt almost exclusively with flat stock (no bending required). I guess I won't be of much help to you and your friend then. Sorry.

 

Maybe JDM can suggest something although he does like to remind everyone that AutoCAD is old school and Inventor is the future. Unfortunately not everyone wants to or can afford to make the jump.

 

Maybe your friend can download a trial copy of Inventor and literally knock out his boat in 30 days or less (before the trial runs out). LOL

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Tiger

Oh we have Inventor at the company, so there is really no hindrance for him to learn it his leisure - even at work since there are talk about migrating to Inventor for the whole division - but you know.... old dogs and all that :)

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SuperCAD

http://www.solid3dtech.com

 

I've used their unfoldsurf for a complex curved plywood structure and it worked like a charm. You can demo it for a few days to see if it will work for your friend.

 

EDIT = It's called SmartUnfold now.

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JD Mather
Unfortunately not everyone ....can afford to make the jump.

 

If you spend lots of time on workarounds to get the job done in AutoCAD how can you afford not to make the jump?

 

Uhmmm, if the tool you have won't do the job how can you afford not to make the jump?

 

This could be a real challenge even in Inventor depending on how the plates are bent. Bending yes, double bends maybe, deep draw forming, no. Can model it but might not flatten without add-on program.

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JD Mather
... talk about migrating to Inventor ... - but you know.... old dogs and all that :)

 

I think I would start with something easier.

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ReMark

JDM: Can you convince my boss to let me get Inventor?

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Tiger
I think I would start with something easier.

 

Start with something easier than a boat? Or start with something easier than Inventor?

 

I know that a boat is not the easiest place to start, but if that is what he wants to do, I will help him as much as I can.

 

About making the jump to Inventor... or no, I won't go there, that discussion have been had here plenty of times before.

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ReMark

Maybe I should look into upgrading my AutoCAD 2011 to Inventor Suite? If I understand it correctly AutoCAD users can upgrade and Inventor Suite comes bundled with AutoCAD Mechanical. So as I see it I would have three pieces of software rolled into one: Inventor, Mechanical and plain AutoCAD right (through the Mechanical program interface)?

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Tiger

Our Inventor comes in bundle yes, with Mechanical.But just Mechanical, no more vanilla... at least that's how I have had it presented to me.

 

And yes, the upgrade cost is nothing compared to the new purchase-price.

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JD Mather
Our Inventor comes in bundle yes, with Mechanical. But just Mechanical, no more vanilla... at least that's how I have had it presented to me.

 

It was presented to you incorrectly.

AutoCAD Mechanical runs on top of AutoCAD so you have to have AutoCAD.

 

Simply right click and drag icon to desktop. I have never used Mechanical. Always use vanilla AutoCAD from my Inventor install.

 

All Inventor versions except Inventor LT include AutoCAD Mechanical (and therefore AutoCAD) for free. (you could look at it as you are purchasing AutoCAD and getting Inventor for $1300 if you were not simply paying upgrade price) Old version of Mechanical Desktop can also be downloaded with Inventor license.

 

Inventor LT and AutoCAD Inventor LT are different products, one including AutoCAD. Check with your VAR for Autodesk bundling schemes.

 

I posted a link to the Inventor product matrix in the Inventor forum yesterday (for some reason, I think 8.5 x 11 format, the matrix doesn't include the AutoCAD inclusion).

Vanilla.png

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Tiger
It was presented to you incorrectly.

AutoCAD Mechanical runs on top of AutoCAD so you have to have AutoCAD.

 

...

 

I stand corrected - have never fiddled with verticals so I have always assumed that they are one program, not a addition to vanilla.

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JD Mather
JDM: Can you convince my boss to let me get Inventor?

 

LOL, I just drove through Connecticut a coupe of weeks ago, should have dropped in on you. I only have an idea of what you do, but I think Inventor would really pay off for your work. Virtually everyone I know would consider it torture to go back to AutoCAD. Of course there is a learning curve involved, it can be frustrating when you are comfortable with one CAD package to try to learn a new game.

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JD Mather
I stand corrected - have never fiddled with verticals so I have always assumed that they are one program, not a addition to vanilla.

 

I should clarify that Inventor is in no way shape or form an addition to vanilla. Completely different platform designed from scratch. Don't need to install the AutoCAD (Mechanical). Autodesk simply bundles to help the transition to new technology. During the learning phase when you need to get the job out the door - go back to what you know.

 

I recommend NOT installing the AutoCAD (Mechanical) at a site trying make the conversion to Inventor as the old-timers will always revert to what they are comfortable with. It is all but impossible to make some people dig in and learn the new techniques unless you take away the crutch.

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Tiger
I should clarify that Inventor is in no way shape or form an addition to vanilla. Completely different platform designed from scratch. Don't need to install the AutoCAD (Mechanical). Autodesk simply bundles to help the transition to new technology. During the learning phase when you need to get the job out the door - go back to what you know.

I got the basic course in Inventor so I at least know that - and I would sure like to learn it proper, but since then I have changed work tasks completely and if anything I am looking at Civil 3D as the possible 3D-program-upgrade right now.

 

I recommend NOT installing the AutoCAD (Mechanical) at a site trying make the conversion to Inventor as the old-timers will always revert to what they are comfortable with. It is all but impossible to make some people dig in and learn the new techniques unless you take away the crutch.

 

:lol:I completely agree with you - but my boss just looked at me and shook his head when I said I would refuse to get AutoCAD running on my collegues computers :twisted:

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