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tzframpton

Can anyone explain "plat" or "plat engineering"??

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tzframpton

I think this has to do with the Civil guys. Here's the scoop: I'm creating a three bay auto shop add on for a guy that I know who owns his own mechanical repair shop. I called the city after I submitted the building layout because they are requesting a bit more information from me, such as a site plan, etc etc. The lady I talked to at the city office said he needs to get his site platted by a plat engineer. Can anyone explain this to me? I have searched Wikipedia and it explains what it is but can anyone give me a bit more detailed info as to who I call? I don't know if I call a surveying company or what. Thanks in advance!!

 

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sinc

The term "plat engineer" is a new one for me, but yes, that is something Surveyors do.

 

The general idea is that, before a piece of land can be developed, it usually has to be "platted". This defines the extents of the land, much like a deed, but unlike a deed, a subdivision plat also has requirements for setting monuments on the land, to physically mark the extents of the parcel. The plat also typically delineates any easements or rights-of-way that belong to the city, as well as any other requirements imposed upon the owner of the land by the city, and maybe more, along with all necessary signatures of approval. The plat also gives the piece of land an official name, which can be used from then on to describe the property (e.g., "Main Street Plaza" or "Buena Vista Subdivision" or whatever).

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ReMark

It's a plot plan or at least that's what it is called here in Connecticut. A plot plan shows the property lines, setbacks (zoning) and the location of the house and any out buildings (like a garage) in relationship to the property lines. Property lines should have the lengths depicted. There should be a north arrow on the plot plan too. If there are any property line markers such as iron pins (usually at property corners) they should be shown as well. Fences (like chain link or split rail) are indicated also.

 

Usually a surveyor will draw this plot plan up after having done a survey of the property. Sometimes you might find one on file at the building department or in the engineering office if the town/city is large enough to have one. Occasionally the property will be shown on a subdivision map especially if it is a residential lot.

 

Different towns/cities have different requirements. Some are more strict than others. I drew up the plot plan for my brother-in-law when he decided to put up a one car garage on his property and it was accepted without question despite the fact I am not a surveyor.

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sinc

A "plot plan" is very different from a "plat".

 

The "plat" defines the subdivision and any lots within it, but does not show improvements. The "plot plan" shows planned improvements on a lot. They are distinctly different documents, and have very different requirements and regulations.

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ReMark

sinc: You are correct. That's what I get for posting at the end of a long day. Plat...plot...pleeeeeeeugh. LOL

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tzframpton

Thanks for the tips, guys. I think I will call the county's appraisal district for the best info regarding this. I guess the owner of this property will be forking out mas dinero for his renovation.

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Dana W

You bet he will.

 

"Plat Engineer" translates to Professional Land Surveyor and/or Land Development Engineer.

 

Talk to a Professional Land Surveyor. Many of them are degreed civil engineers anyway whether registered as one or not. You might find one by checking with a Real Estate Title (Settlement) Company that deals with small commercial properties.

 

I have no idea what the Dallas rules are, but here in MD there are special surveying requirements for commercial property. In all likelyhood your friend will have to get some surveying done.

 

I will bet that there already is a recorded plat for your friend's lot on file at the City Hall that you can use for a starting point. You will need a copy of the existing records. Before any building plans are put to paper(screen) you need to know where the building restriction lines, set back lines, and all utility easements are. A surveyor knows how far back into the records to look for things that may have gotten left off of the most recent records, too. Stuff happens.

 

When refering to land use, it is always PLAT, never PLOT, no matter how many times you see it otherwise. They are both pronounced the same, except in Texas.:lol:

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sinc

When refering to land use, it is always PLAT, never PLOT, no matter how many times you see it otherwise. They are both pronounced the same, except in Texas.:lol:

 

Here in Colorado, "Plat" is used for a wide array of land-use drawings, but not for "Plot Plans", which are a very specific item that is created prior to adding any significant structural improvements to a lot. As far as pronunciation, "plat" rhymes with "flat" and "plot" rhymes with "trot". I've never heard "plot" pronounced the same as "plat". In fact, if someone did that, it would probably create quite a bit of confusion.

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Dana W
Here in Colorado, "Plat" is used for a wide array of land-use drawings, but not for "Plot Plans", which are a very specific item that is created prior to adding any significant structural improvements to a lot. As far as pronunciation, "plat" rhymes with "flat" and "plot" rhymes with "trot". I've never heard "plot" pronounced the same as "plat". In fact, if someone did that, it would probably create quite a bit of confusion.

 

Well, yeah, there is that one.:oops: Thanks for adding that. I do tend to be too broad at times. Those are usually called "Developement Plans" here.

 

Still, here in Maryland, both Plat and Plot sorta almost rhymn with trot, all three being pronounced as if they were spelled with a broad "A".

 

Gotta go. Headed for St. Mary's County. Gonna get me a couple dozen arsters :wink: on the halfshell down there.

Pssst (Hey, people. Make sure you know where your oysters (arsters) come from when you are in Colorado, or Texas.):lol:

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dent

In my area, it is called a "Site Plan". Our local specs are basically:

 

All new construction and major reconstruction of commercial, industrial, institutional and multi-family buildings require site plan review as do certain other uses that fall within the following categories:

 

Any structure in excess of forty-five (45) feet

Public utilities facilities and structures

Any building to be used as a restaurant, nightclub, adult entertainment establishment

Multiple buildings on one site or campus buildings

Commercial communication towers

Any building to be used as a bank with drive-through windows

Any building to be used as a convenience type grocery story

Service station conversions

Modular commercial buildings

Produce stands

Any use that has been approved by the City Council as a Use Permit

Any non-residential use located within a UV, NMU-1, UTC, CMU-1, C-4 and/or C1A zoning district.

Site Plan Review Application and drawings should be submitted to the Land Development Division located on the 2nd floor of the Warren Hood Building, 200 S. President St., Jackson, MS 39201. The Land Development and Public Works staffs have written a helpful Development Manual, which is available on the 2nd floor, room 204 of the Hood Building.

 

The Site Plan Review package must include a complete application and the following civil plans:

 

Sheet 1: Survey of existing site and vicinity map (what is on the ground now)

Sheet 2: Site Plan of proposed on-site and off-site improvements

Sheet 3: Landscaping Plan

Sheet 4: Utility Plan

Sheet 5: Erosion Control Plan

Sheet 6: Grading and Drainage Plan.

 

 

This will require a surveyor and an engineer. Some areas need only a drawing showing property lines and the building location reference to the property lines for zoning purposed. The first thing you need to do is see if the city has its requirements on line or go down and get a copy of the specs. That will show you which way to go.

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sinc

We have one of those around here, too, but we call that a "Development Plan".

 

The "Plot Plan" we have is more like that last thing you mentioned, and usually shows little more than the lot and easement lines, existing improvements, and planned improvements. The "Plot Plan" is all that is needed when people build additions onto their existing house. It's also all that's needed when building in a lot in a recently-created residential subdivision. I think the rule in Colorado is that if the subdivision is more than 20 years old, then we must do a monumented Land Survey Plat instead. But we generally do a Land Survey Plat anyway if we have to set the corners, even on newer subdivisions.

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Dana W

If you want to get into the bones, Plot is a defined area of actual physical real estate. Plat is a piece of paper.

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dent

Well, we can play semantics all day long to no good end. The solution is to go back to the city and ask them what they specifically need. They probably have some sort of document, like the one I posted earlier, that will give all of the answers.

Call it a "cat" or call it a "goat", but you need to decide which one you are going to throw a saddle on.

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Dana W

Well, that's me all over. :lol:Been rubbing a goat's hair the wrong way for some time now, and found out I shoulda been rubbin' a cat.:lol:

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rkmcswain

I have no idea what the Dallas rules are, but here in MD there are special surveying requirements for commercial property. In all likelyhood your friend will have to get some surveying done.

 

In Texas, a plat is a legal document that is recorded by the county clerk. It must be sealed by an RPLS, and some municipalities also require a seal by a P.E. Generally, you can't get building permits, or a road bond until the plat is recorded.

 

Styk - here is a sample fee schedule. http://www.houstontx.gov/planning/DevelopRegs/docs_pdfs/Platting_Fees.pdf

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tzframpton

Thanks, Dent. Very useful info you gave me.

 

McSwain, thanks for the links too. :thumbsup:

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tzframpton

As far as an update I called the city office and talked to the lady for awhile. She was a great help. My best friend is in excavation so I gave him a call and he said to talk to the owner of his company whom I've met before. I told him the deal and he gave me some info to a company called Statewide Surveying and talked to the owner there. Luckily they do exactly what I need. All I had to do was give him a copy of the deed to the property as well as any existing plat, which the lady at the city office already provided me. Gave me a call back with a quote of $1,400 for his services, and he'll export the file into a DWG format for me to have so I can lay out the building. Thanks again for all the help everyone, I got the ball rolling and looks like this job is going to finish up fine. The lady at the city office said my building construction documents were perfectly fine, so when I combine them onto the site plan the owner will be ready for permits.

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