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Epicurwin

Adding 1/8" Gaskets to Piping

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Epicurwin

I need to add 1/8" gaskets to flanged piping. My primary reason for doing this is so I can get the correct length for the pipe. I was planning on simply pulling the flanges back and 1/8" but when I do that it stretches the pipe. Is there a way to detatch pipe from fitting or fittings from fittings so I can move them independently. Or could I just add 1/8" gaskets in there somehow. I'm of course working in 3d. autocad 2007. I can always create fab-drawings by just doing the math with the current drawings but I want to try to get it in the model, just in case. I'd apreaciate the help. I'm probably working the weekend on this so don't be afraid to post soon. :)

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ReMark

Somehow you need to create the 1/8" gap so you can insert the gasket between the flange faces. You could always use the Move Faces command to "stretch" one pipe thus making it shorter by the amount you need. Did you already union the flange to the pipe?

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Epicurwin

I'm not quite sure what the move Faces command is. how do you enter that command I tried movefaces and nothing came up. Most of the work I do on pipe is using regular move command or stretching the pipe with the grips. If I use the grips the pipe changes length but it also moves the fittings and valves, which is the problem. I managed to get the correct length by deleting the flange and then moving the pipe. The flange will be connected directly to the pipe, but I can't find a option to have to flange be a part of the pipe. When I try to add flanges to the end manually it shortens the pipe to get the flange to match where the end of the pipe was. I guess I could just measure from flange to flange but I feel clicking on the pipe and reading its length would be easier and perhaps be harder to screw up. I'm sorry if I seem ignorant of basic cad piping, or piping in general, I'm an archy working in a engineering firm, damn economy :).

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ReMark

I thought you were working in 3D? Move Faces is a 3D editing command.

 

Are you using an add-on program to AutoCAD for the piping?

 

What type of flanges are you using? Slip on? Threaded? Lap joint? Other?

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DANIEL

is the pipe run blocked perhaps?

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SLW210

To use Move Faces from command line....

 

Command: _solidedit
Solids editing automatic checking:  SOLIDCHECK=1
Enter a solids editing option [Face/Edge/Body/Undo/eXit] <eXit>: _face
Enter a face editing option
[Extrude/Move/Rotate/Offset/Taper/Delete/Copy/coLor/mAterial/Undo/eXit] <eXit>: 
_move
Select faces or [undo/Remove]: *Cancel*

 

Also Modify drop down Solid Editing>Move Faces.

 

I have moved this thread to 3D modelling forum.

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tzframpton

If you can get an approval on upgrading to AutoCAD MEP then all this can be solved for you as you use the Piping and Pipe Fitting 3D catalogs for your designing.

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ColinPearson
If I use the grips the pipe changes length but it also moves the fittings and valves, which is the problem. I managed to get the correct length by deleting the flange and then moving the pipe. The flange will be connected directly to the pipe, but I can't find a option to have to flange be a part of the pipe. When I try to add flanges to the end manually it shortens the pipe to get the flange to match where the end of the pipe was.

 

Is anyone else wondering about this? If a grip moves both the pipe and flange, then the objects are either UNIONED together, of part of a block, right? If that's the case (and I may be wrong, fo sho), how is OP deleting the flange without affecting the pipe? B/C any Boolean operation pretty much gets rid of your ability to use the grips to STRETCH, doesn't it?

 

 

 

Also, to the OP, make sure that the flanges you're using (or the ones you have drawn yourself) include the height of the gasket surface (1/16" for lower pressure classes and up from there). I've seen some companies' blocks not include this and it can be significant if you have a long run. And if you've drawn them yourself, the tables you used should specify whether the dimensions given include or exclude this height. ...Not to assume what you may/may not know, just a heads up if it helps.

Edited by ColinPearson

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