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miroslav_s

Oposite to union command?

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miroslav_s

Hi guys,

I was wondering if you have to solid objects and then use UNION command to make them as ONE object BUT then I don´t after a while you realise that this was a mistake is there a command that you can use to split them as they were before (beside from command undo or slice).

Thanks for answering in advance and best regards to you all

Miro

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ReMark

Sorry...there is no UN-Union command. Had you kept your original geometry you would not find yourself seeking a miracle.

 

Set the system variable DELOBJ to "0". All defining geometry is retained as per AutoCAD's Help file.

 

DELOBJ

Controls whether geometry used to create 3D objects is retained or deleted.

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miroslav_s

God...you are quick. I just posted my thread :)

Thanks Remark for answering. I was just wondering so that I don´t do I mistake in the future.

So Autocad isn´t perfect after all. Just joking. Great program!

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Dadgad
Hi guys,

I was wondering if you have to solid objects and then use UNION command to make them as ONE object BUT then I don´t after a while you realise that this was a mistake is there a command that you can use to split them as they were before (beside from command undo or slice).

Thanks for answering in advance and best regards to you all

Miro

 

ReMark is quite right about the best practice regarding saving geometry and history of solids.

This probably won't be much help, but there is one tool which is available for separating noncontinuous types of solids. On the solid editing toolbar you will find the SEPARATE command, which can also be accessed through the SOLIDEDIT command, by selecting the appropriate options from the commandline prompts. I prefer using it from the toolbar, as it is much easier.

As you mentioned perhaps using the slice command, this actually might be applicable in your case. Worth a shot.

solid edit separate.JPG

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ReMark

The key word is "non-continuous". If the objects share even the tinniest piece of geometry the SEPARATE command will not work.

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Dadgad
The key word is "non-continuous". If the objects share even the tinniest piece of geometry the SEPARATE command will not work.

 

Right again there brother, for simple assembly modeled items, weldments and such, no INTERFERENCE nor INTERSECTION generated 3D objects.

 

And what happens if we are working with a material other than tin? :whistle:

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2MARS

You can Use the decompos commande as well 

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ammobake

I do recall in Autodesk Architecture there used to be a way to right click a solid and undo any join commands and I think there was an option to regenerate the parent objects but I may be thinking of architecture-specific assemblies like slabs ... Can't remember it's been like 11 yrs.

 

I think I was using slabs joined together and creating other slabs to subtract from those like a 3D object in CAD (to create a specific roof profile).

Because it saves your edits you can go back and undo the changes later on.

 

-ChriS

 

 

 

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lrm

Here's a process you can use to get back to the shape you had before doing a Boolean Union.

In the sequence of images below we start with 2 solids (red and yellow). The second image shows the result after the union command.

Let's assume that both object are complex and that undo is not an option at this stage.

The third object is the result of exploding the unioned solid and deleting the surfaces that were part of the red object.

The top and bottom surfaces are then exploded and deleted leaving the lines that form the seams between the two original solids.

The "hole" lines are deleted and   surfnetwork is used to create the red surface (top and bottom) from the edges of the open side (fifth image).

surfsculpt is then used to create the green solid.

The original red object could be created in a similar process.

image.png.d99c4a7ff1204b6be41b61a42b0f091f.png

 

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