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Shoja

Hi folks

 

I have a floor plan of residential building. In modeling mode the ratio is 1:1, after I fitted the drawing to my viewport in layout mode, the ratio is lets say 1:50.

Does this effect my dimension? I used metric unit (Centimeter), because I thought when someone reads my drawing, he will count each 1 unit as 50 which I dont want. I know it sounds kinda rookie, bu pls som1 give some hands

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Bill Tillman

As long as you've drawn 1:1 in your model space, you can present your plan in any scale you like in a viewport on one of the layout tabs. To make the entire plan fit in the available size of the viewport on your layout you will chose a scale which will allow for that. And if 1:50 is what you end up with then yes, when you're client actually lays a scale down on the printed page, they will see that 50 cm (units) is equal to 1 cm. I'm not sure why you're not wanting that to be the case. This is what setting a scale is all about. Your dimensions will not change, it's just that they will be scaled to the scale you set for the viewport.

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Shoja

Tnx buddy:

 

I got what u mean, then for instance; if length of wall is 500cm in modeling mode; but in layout mode in order to fit accuratley to paper size I end up to 1:50, the mentioned dimensioned yet same?

Besides, Would u tell me which scales are mostly used? Specifically for civil works?

 

thn a ton:D

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Dana W
Tnx buddy:

 

I got what u mean, then for instance; if length of wall is 500cm in modeling mode; but in layout mode in order to fit accuratley to paper size I end up to 1:50, the mentioned dimensioned yet same?

Besides, Would u tell me which scales are mostly used? Specifically for civil works?

 

thn a ton:D

Yes, the dimensions will remain the same. Just think of a viewport as a hole in your paper, and the paper is at a distance from the plane of your drawing so you can see the whole thing, much like a film director will hold up his hands and view a potential scene through a rectangle formed with his fingers. The common scales for civil drawings are in whole tens, hundreds, or thousands, the most common ones being 1:20, 1:50, 1:100, 1:500, 1:1000.

 

Since there are still people who have to do materials take-off's for estimating purposes from a paper drawing using a hand held scale, we have to accommodate them by sticking to standards even though the first rule of building something is "NEVER measure the blueprints.".

 

When working in metric units, it is sometimes acceptable to vary the scale from the common scales to fit special circumstances. I have seen 1:250, 1:300, and other odd scales. Since everything is divided or multiplied by 10 it is easy to do a materials take-off the old way, with a metric rule.

 

When working in imperial units, you want to avoid random custom scales since there would be no way to measure the drawing accurately once on paper. The drawing scale has to have a modulus of the divisions on a common imperial ruler or match the 12 most common scales on an architectural rule. Examples are 1/4" = 1'-0", 1/2" = 1'-0", 1 1/2" = 1'-0", 3" = 1'-0".....

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Shoja

tnx Maestro, for ur great explanation :thumbsup:

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