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bruce lee

how many years to learn revit

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bruce lee

how many years does it take to learn revit on average ?

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tzframpton

That's like asking how long is a piece of string. It just depends. Usually takes a few years to become very efficient at the fundamentals but Revit is a program that will constantly challenge you.

 

It's all about learning Families and their parametric relationship with the project. It takes a while to understand the full potential of a Revit Family since the possibilities are endless.

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Organic
Usually takes a few years to become very efficient at the fundamentals

 

That is hardly a ringing endorsement of the program. Most companies do not have years to wait for people to become efficient in new software.

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RobDraw
Most companies do not have years to wait for people to become efficient in new software.

 

Then they wouldn't hire people without any experience.

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Cad64
Usually takes a few years to become very efficient at the fundamentals

 

That is hardly a ringing endorsement of the program. Most companies do not have years to wait for people to become efficient in new software.

 

You can learn the basics of any program in just a few months and be relatively productive, but it takes time to become truly efficient, and I think most companies know this to be true. That's why there are different levels and pay scales for new hire's, (entry level, mid level, experienced, etc.). Some companies are willing to train and let you learn and develop your skills on the job while others need someone to come in and hit the ground running. It all depends on the company and their current needs. Saying that "most" companies won't wait for people to become efficient is a false and misleading statement in my opinion.

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tzframpton
You can learn the basics of any program in just a few months and be relatively productive, but it takes time to become truly efficient, and I think most companies know this to be true.
Exactly. But what Organic doesn't realize, is that by "fundamentals" I mean all the fundamentals. Revit is an application that suports engineering informational data, and to learn the fundamentals of heating load calcs, pipe/duct sizing calcs, electrical calcs, analytical structural calcs, etc is another piece of the "fundamentals" pie. Sure, you can learn the basics of modeling and system/loadable Families in months. But that's only scratching the surface, and Revit is not intended to be used in a "minimal" way.

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steven-g

OK I'll buy into it, if Revit is so different, where is the best place to start learning, training centres are not an option, I want to get a good understanding of the concepts, what would be some of the on-line resources- or books that would be recommended.

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tzframpton
OK I'll buy into it, if Revit is so different, where is the best place to start learning, training centres are not an option, I want to get a good understanding of the concepts, what would be some of the on-line resources- or books that would be recommended.
Any of the Paul F. Aubin books are fantastic. Plus, they come with downloadable Dataset Files: http://paulaubin.com/books/the-aubin-academy-revit-mep-2014/

 

The ones I linked above are strictly MEP, but he's got Architectural, and I believe Structural as well. If you download Revit trial, after thirty day grace period you still have full access to the program - minus saving and plotting. So you can still continue to use it to the full extent for learning/training purposes. Jump on Amazon.com and search for any of the Paul F. Aubin books.

 

Also there is a TON of free PDF/eBook material on AU (Autodesk University). http://www.RevitForum.org is the best place on the web for Revit help and discussion, might want to sign up over there.

 

And, of course, there's always the "Getting Started" guide in the Help file here: http://help.autodesk.com/view/RVT/2014/ENU/

 

-Tannar

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steven-g

I'm not sure how useful it will be, I work in a joinery shop mainly doing door sets and cabinet work (kitchens), though the company I work for is a major building company (they use full Autocad), I think it will be good to at least know the basic principles behind a parametric program. Or is Revit something that can/could be used for that scale of work.

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tzframpton
I'm not sure how useful it will be, I work in a joinery shop mainly doing door sets and cabinet work (kitchens), though the company I work for is a major building company (they use full Autocad), I think it will be good to at least know the basic principles behind a parametric program. Or is Revit something that can/could be used for that scale of work.
Sure, you could use Revit. If you work for a manufacturer, then providing Door Families and Casework Families on your company's website would be greatly appreciated in the Revit world. You can embed your company's information into the Revit Family to "brand" the content (which cannot be removed), which could be a good marketing ploy. That way architects and designers could use your Revit Content to better design around your company's standards.

 

But it's something you and your company would have to consider if it's worth it or not. Revit is definitely an investment and it sounds like your company is in a specialized division of residential/commercial interiors so only a small portion of Revit would be used in your case.

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steven-g

As a company we design and build, the whole project. Residential would be a ten storey apartment block\blocks, Industrial buildings and Hospitals. All from Autocad, at the moment.

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tzframpton
As a company we design and build, the whole project. Residential would be a ten storey apartment block\blocks, Industrial buildings and Hospitals. All from Autocad, at the moment.
Then yeah, I'd say it's worth looking into then. Do you have any other firms that you currently work with... that may already be using Revit? If so, see if you can't approach them and talk about the platform and it's pros/cons.

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