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CheSyn

AutoCAD 3D vs Revit for Structural Plans and Renderings

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CheSyn

I have extensive experience with AutoCAD - but I would like to start learning/using Revit. The majority of use would be for residential applications.

 

From my understanding, Revit is mainly used for floor plans, leaving "space" for building materials, but not placing materials themselves.

 

A client has asked for a 3D rendering of a proposed deck on his house (for visualization and "instructions"), as well as orthographic 2D plans to submit for permits. I have done this many times with AutoCAD, but was wondering if this was a task Revit could help expediate.

 

Am I better off layering a 3D AutoCAD drawing with all materials sized and placed appropriately, or is this a task Revit would excel at?

 

Thank you in advance for any insight and advice.

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tzframpton
From my understanding, Revit is mainly used for floor plans, leaving "space" for building materials, but not placing materials themselves.
I don't know where you heard that but it's completely false. You can tie Material to any object you want. Below is a 3D walkthrough that our department created last week, and all the objects and materials were generated in Revit:

 

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CheSyn

Hello Tannar, perhaps I used the wrong terminology. From desrcriptions I've read, Revit will create walls, but will not place studs within walls and drywall on the studs. Closer to my example above, it would not show individual joists. (perhaps your video shows this, but I cannot watch Youtube videos at work)

 

If this is not correct, does Revit create any advantage over modelling in AutoCAD (ie: time, ease, etc...), specifically pertaining to my needs above?

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tzframpton

Revit creates walls. AutoCAD does NOT create walls. Revit can be used for wood framing within walls by using Parts, or you can use Structural Framing Families to generate a stud framing system within walls. Since AutoCAD doesn't have "walls", it can't compare directly. And in the AEC industry, Revit is completely advantageous above and beyond AutoCAD. It's not even fair to compare them.

 

What's the source that you're getting this questionable information from?

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CheSyn

I see! I was creating solids and piecing them together to create "walls" and various other structures in AutoCAD, which was extremely tedious (especially when revisions were needed).

 

I found information on various forum and blog posts, and Youtube videos. Obviously the information was incorrect. Thank you for clarifying.

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tzframpton
I see! I was creating solids and piecing them together to create "walls" and various other structures in AutoCAD, which was extremely tedious (especially when revisions were needed).
You mentioned the key word here.... "revisions". You do understand that the term "Revit" is short for "Revise It", correct? This is one of the main philosophies of using Revit over AutoCAD. Revit is parametric... you can change a simple value to make edits or changes later. AutoCAD.... ugh... don't even get me started.

 

I found information on various forum and blog posts, and Youtube videos. Obviously the information was incorrect. Thank you for clarifying.
Well, the information isn't necessarily incorrect, it's just that Revit, right out of the box, doesn't "auto-magically" place stud-wall framing inside the Wall Family. You still have to apply effort in doing this, but when compared to AutoCAD it's 100% night and day in terms of accuracy and efficiency.

 

There is even a framing add-on, and it works fantastic, but it comes with a hefty price tag. So if you work for a framing company it'd be worth proposing it to uppers for budgeting for it, but if not, Revit is more than capable of producing stud-wall framing with walls.

 

:)

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RobDraw
"Revit" is short for "Revise It")

 

For a while, I thought this was so silly that it could not be true. It has the feel of an urban myth but it's on Wikipedia. So, it must be true.

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CheSyn
You mentioned the key word here.... "revisions". You do understand that the term "Revit" is short for "Revise It", correct? This is one of the main philosophies of using Revit over AutoCAD. Revit is parametric... you can change a simple value to make edits or changes later. AutoCAD.... ugh... don't even get me started.

 

Call me "scared of change" :lol:

I was comfortable with AutoCAD, so I never saw a need to change. The increased demand for 3D renderings forced my hand.

 

Well, the information isn't necessarily incorrect, it's just that Revit, right out of the box, doesn't "auto-magically" place stud-wall framing inside the Wall Family. You still have to apply effort in doing this, but when compared to AutoCAD it's 100% night and day in terms of accuracy and efficiency.

 

There is even a framing add-on, and it works fantastic, but it comes with a hefty price tag. So if you work for a framing company it'd be worth proposing it to uppers for budgeting for it, but if not, Revit is more than capable of producing stud-wall framing with walls.

 

:)

 

I toyed with it for a few hours last night and was able to draw my plans. The only issue I came across was for a framing detail where the face of a joist meets a beam at a 45D angle. In CAD I would just slice the solid to create a 45D face. Looking online, it appears I can either use "Opening by Face" or "Cut Geometry" when working with beams in Revit.

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tzframpton
Call me "scared of change" I was comfortable with AutoCAD, so I never saw a need to change. The increased demand for 3D renderings forced my hand.
I understand. We all want to stick with what we're used to. Sometimes we forget that what we're used to took lots of time and investment to get where we are today. When moving to a new CAD platform, you lose years of time investment but trust me it's for the better.

 

I toyed with it for a few hours last night and was able to draw my plans. The only issue I came across was for a framing detail where the face of a joist meets a beam at a 45D angle. In CAD I would just slice the solid to create a 45D face. Looking online, it appears I can either use "Opening by Face" or "Cut Geometry" when working with beams in Revit.
Correct. You can also use Reference Planes to "slice" a beam at any angle you desire with the Cut tool.

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