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xoHaya

I imported a drawing that is not 1:1 scale , when I draw in it, the units are wrong!

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xoHaya

Hi,

 

So I downloaded a 2D plan of a fastener from McMaster-Carr. I copied and imported it in a new drawing (to see the difference). I want to use it to make a simplified representation and an assembly drawing. However, the drawing does not seem to be at a 1:1 scale. I can't figure out how to know what scale it is on the use the scale command to factor it. Is there a way I can convert it to a 1:1 scale?

 

If i change the dimscale/style it changes but, the drawing is still off.

 

I attached a screenshot of what I mean. The length is supposed to be 3'' but when I measure it it's actually 4.5''. The length is supposed to be 3'". I want to draw in the same scale as the drawing.

 

Thank you for your time, if I'm not clear please tell me, it's my first post.

Untitled.jpg

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SLW210

Yes, it happens occasionally with their files.

 

Use the Scale>Reference option.

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Dana W

Is the 4.5 the only dimension that is wrong? Can you upload the drawing so we can examine it?

 

If one or more of the other dimensions are correct, it could be that the bolt is simply drawn incorrectly.

 

EDIT: Also, SLW might have nailed it. I have seen some of their drawings with a few of the dimensions overridden. Somebody doesn't see the point of changing the geometry to match only one dimension. If I had to draw a few dozen bolts which only vary in length I could see why.

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Dadgad

Welcome to CADTutor xoHaya. :)

 

If the only dimension which appears wrong, because it was overridden, as Dana suggests, is the length, then easily fixed.

Turn on your ORTHO.

Copy your bolt up a known distance, let's arbitrarily say 4 inches.

Offset the line which represents the flat underside of the bolt head, to the right by 1 1/2".

Use the TRIM command with ALL option, and ERASE, to quickly remove any of the unwanted threaded shaft, which is obviously defined by the area between the bottom surface of the bolt head and the offset line.

Then move the remaining threaded shaft, which now measures 3", to the left by 1 1/2".

You can then move the original bolt and the new trimmed bolt by 4", to incorporate your new linework.

Call it a day.

 

You may want to save it as a block, with the WBLOCK command, which will make it easier to copy or move around, once you have it how you want it.

 

May all your problems, be so quickly and easily resolved. :)

Edited by Dadgad

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SLW210

I went and got that file from McMaster-Carr and mine is properly scaled.

 

Can you upload the .dwg you got from McMaster-Carr?

91309A847-.75-10 x 3 HHCS.DWG

MMC HHCS.jpg

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xoHaya

Thank you all for your answers!

 

Here is my file to show what i mean. The dimensions I took are in red. Half the dimensions are good.. the other half are off.

 

So I just have to modify the drawing, it has nothing to do with the scale?

 

McMaster Prob.dwg

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ReMark

They aren't off. Maybe it's the fact you have the precision for dimensions set to two decimal places and not three.

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xoHaya

Oups! you are right! sorry! let me get the file I was working with yesterday!

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xoHaya

PROB.dwg

 

Here we are. So if i draw a line of 3", it makes a line of 2" ?

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ReMark

Who was it that applied a measurement scale factor, in the dimensions style dialog box, of 0.666666666667? Was it you?

 

I think someone scaled the parts up (1.5004444X) then to get the correct dimensions they changed the measurement scale factor to the value previously mentioned. Who did it or why is a mystery to me.

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ReMark

First image shows the hex head as it originally appeared and after it has been correctly resized to the proper width of 1.125". However, since the measurement scale factor of 0.66666666667 has not been changed it is dimensionaly incorrect after the rescaling.

 

meas_scale_fac0.666.JPG

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ReMark

Second image shows what happens after changing the measurement scale factor back to "1" which it should be.

 

meas_scale_fac_1.JPG

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xoHaya

Yes thank you ! that fixed it ! :)

 

Is it possible that because I copy/pasted 2 drawings together the dimstyles were modified? because I didn't change the measurement scale.

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ReMark

I have no idea how it may have happened.

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xoHaya

Great I'll be looking out for measurement scales!

 

Thank you so much for your help ReMark!

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JD Mather

Units.PNG

 

First thing I notice is that your document units are currently Feet.

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Dadgad
I have no idea how it may have happened.

 

This is a textbook example of how much more helpful a .dwg is than a screenshot! :beer:

 

Well done gentlemen!

 

What are the typical UNITS in which you work?

Edited by Dadgad

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Dana W
Yes thank you ! that fixed it ! :)

 

Is it possible that because I copy/pasted 2 drawings together the dimstyles were modified? because I didn't change the measurement scale.

Nope.

 

New layers and styles copied over (by copying objects with those layers and styles) will come in unchanged, unless they are named the same as stuff already in the receiving drawing, in which case they will adopt the properties of the receiving drawing. Existing layers and styles in the receiving drawing are never modified or replaced simply by copying pieces of another drawing into it.

 

The uniqueness of all layers and styles are preserved from damage by copying or inserting things into a drawing. The lists just get longer.

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