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brassworks

A bit of pre-AutoCAD drafting history

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cadencesol

Some days ago I worked with one of my client who is also using his hand for doing Structural drawing. I just saw the drawing the drawing is in perfect scale. There is total 100 of drawings A0 to A3 sizes, and after that he converted all the drawings into dwg format. But really he his doing a great job.

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WVCE84

i found this at my office a while back. Someone had to tell me what it was.

DSC00044 - Copy.jpg

 

electric eraser

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Noahma
i found this at my office a while back. Someone had to tell me what it was.

[ATTACH]4943[/ATTACH]

 

electric eraser

 

everyone in our office has a couple of those lol. Mine works decently, and it will erase ink off of plots too

 

there are still a few places that sell the erasers, several different kinds too

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chrisdarmanin

lol electric eraser! i used to use an eraser shield but i think they were quite common...

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ReMark

I worked for a medium size engineering firm for three years and every Christmas we would have a company sponsored dinner. Once the meal was finished, and before the band began to play and the dancing started, they would have a slide show (remember those?). Pictures of all the employees "on the job" would be shown. When it came to slides of the drafting department it turned out everyone of the draftsmen was holding an electric eraser when our pictures were taken. Someone in the audience yelled out, "Doesn't anyone in the drafting department know how to use a pencil?" That got more than a few laughs.

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WVCE84

not exactly pre-CAD but still from the past

DSC00045.jpg

a 4gb tape

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chrisdarmanin

is that something like the microdrive on the spectrum?

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chrisdarmanin

by the way... i was wondering... did spectrum have autocad?

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WVCE84
is that something like the microdrive on the spectrum?

 

I don't know. I found it in a box with some other old computer equipment.

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halfcracked
oh ****......when I was in college, and returned to New Guinea on term holidays...and had to go into Dad's office.....back in 1967 (aged 17)

 

Got me beat by 17 years there alan - I was born in 67

 

 

and aren't ammonia filled paper cuts lovely. :(

 

we had a print room that did that but as the junior I was the one most expected to help during busy or holiday periods.

 

nothing beats the cuts you'd get in the webbing between thumb & index fingers - we had a blue print machine in my curren't office untill an amonia line broke & gassed out the whole 3 story office building. Building Management insisted we get rid of it. lucky we were mostly cad by then.

I started working on a huge beast that was about 10' tall & could fun a print in a second flat.

 

At home I still have a drafting table. It must have been made in the 1950s: wooden legs, green linoleum (or something) on top, and one of those horizontal bars that slides up and down on wires (always thought that was some kind of magic).

ahhh yes the paralell bar:D I have used those way too much....

That is untill I bought this:

machine1.jpg

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Julie@Integra
...Computer drafting has tons of advantages over hand drafting, but I do miss the heightened sense of art and planning that hand drafting always challenged me with.

 

That's what I often miss about on-the-board drafting: the "art" of it.

 

I can still put my artistic stamp on CAD drawings by how they're organized... but it can be fairly easily duplicated. There was no doubt when looking at my old drawings -- back in the day -- that it was mine.

...........

 

I remember the mylar and sepia paper; pin registration... and the throat-burning, eye-watering ammonia emanating from the print room.

 

I still have some blue-leaded pencils and other ancient tools of the trade, including my electric eraser. I'll never part with them. ;)

 

**sigh** Ahhh, the good ol' days. (I must admit, though, I'd never forfeit copy-and-paste to go backwards.... I don't have the patience anymore.)

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WVCE84

I have not added any pictures for a while so...

DSC00046.JPG

eraser shield

 

DSC00047.JPG

I'm not 100% sure, but I think it is some kind of offset tool

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Guest Alan Cullen

WVCE84,

 

The second piccie is a Leroy lettering gizmo. If you look at my piccies on page 2 you'll see how it works. :)

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brassworks

A very early model of this lettering stylus thingie was shaped very much the same, but instead of the Leroy pen being fixed into it, a little ink-filled cup that tapered down into a pen nib was inserted. It pre-dates my Leroy days; it must have been a lot of fun to fill those little cups with ink with a minimum of drops and spilling.

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ReMark

Still have my original Leroy lettering set and all the guides. We also used to have a much larger set of guides for doing out title sheets. The text size was up to 2". The size of the Leroy stylus was huge!

 

Anyone have an old lettering template? The type with the punched out letters that you traced?

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Guest Alan Cullen

I've still got my Leroy lettering set, plus all my old manual drafting gear. Thank god I don't have to use them anymore. :twisted:

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Dipali
Still have my original Leroy lettering set and all the guides. We also used to have a much larger set of guides for doing out title sheets. The text size was up to 2". The size of the Leroy stylus was huge!

 

Anyone have an old lettering template? The type with the punched out letters that you traced?

 

Yes, I do have it somewhere in my private collection.

we used to call it 'STENCIL'. It used to come in varied sizes. the most common being used were 2mm, 3mm & 5mm within the drawing and 8mm, 12mm for teh titleblock part.

I have intresting experiance to share about it.

when I was studying in first year of architecture degree course, one of my senior friend asked me to help her with submission work (we always used to help with each other in drafting or modeling part) & she wanted me to do stanciling in her working drawings for her. I had not tried it before & bcs i was afraid of messing her drawings, I declined. but than I thought to myself, I will have to do something about it. so in the next semister for one of my assignment of histroy i was documenting architecture of historical place & i had to do 13 - A2 size sheets with detail write ups, so i decided to do it with stencils for a practice. when I started it it was taking me about 5hrs. to do one sheet, but after few sheets I got the hang of it & I could finish one sheet in 2 hrs. And when everybody at Uni sow it they, were amazed & were 'like have u gone mad?':shock:

Also when I started working in an office we had those very large A0 size drawing boards, & some times I had to work on very large drawings. and when i have ot do some stenciling at the top of the sheets like notes & stuff. it was very difficult to reach to it. so i had developed habit of doing it upside down from the other side of the drawing board.:twisted:

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ReMark

Upside down and backwards, in ink, with a "# 000" size pen. That's how we would draft existing topography for our highway and sewer design sheets (mylar). Then we'd flip them over and all the proposed linework would be put in with thicker pens (#2, #3) and Leroy lettering on the front. However, all the existing topography had to be labeled on the front of the sheet, in freehand, with a slant, using both uppercase and lowercase letters. There could be as many as 200 sheets.

 

I got so used to being able to read/write upside down lettering that I could reproduce it at will when sketching out an idea, with callouts, to a co-worker sitting across a table from me.

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WVCE84
WVCE84,

 

The second piccie is a Leroy lettering gizmo. If you look at my piccies on page 2 you'll see how it works. :)

 

Cool, I must have missed that one the first time around.

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BM Drafting

I was in a combined Year 11 and 12 class doing Graphics...

I was in Year 12,

We had a final exam and most of the year 11's were packing it...

 

We had drawing boards with little steel clips (sping steel)

 

While loading up my plans i lifted up the clip and praaaaang...

it snapped in half flew across the room and hit the black board...

 

Not thinking i turned to my mate and said

 

Spring stell my A%&....

 

a little louder then expected...

my teacher was rolling on the floor laughing...

if i see him down the street even today, he's like remember that time...

 

ha ha ha ha

 

 

Long story short, the rest of the exam was very relaxed with class amtes quitely chuckling away...

 

Since we were reminicing...

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