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A bit of pre-AutoCAD drafting history

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PotGuy
Just had an intern complain to me about how awful it was using AutoCAD LT to create a drawing. I went back to my desk and took out my triangles, drafting pencil, erasing shield, compass, circle template and a sheet of vellum. I dropped them on his desk and said, "Try doing the drawing with these instead" and walked away. I should have given him the ruling pens and my set of Koh-i-noor technical pens too.

 

Well, that nearly led to a laugh in the Office!

 

I've never had experience working with AutoCAD LT, but I'm suprised that an Intern would complain.

 

Hopefully it showed him he was lucky to be using the Software at all!

 

I've used all items specified, but what's a Vellum? A specialised drafting paper?

 

Par from Ruling pens.

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ReMark

Vellum

 

"Modern imitation or "paper vellum" is made from plasticized cotton. Usually translucent, paper vellum in various sizes is often used in applications where tracing is required, such as architectural plans."

 

Not to be confused with rice paper or tracing paper.

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tzframpton

ReMark, although your joke was just that - a joke, and while I agree with the point you made... I too would gripe if LT was my only option. I'm sure you know why. :)

 

*EDIT*

We still use Vellum a lot too.

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ReMark

I guess he thought he was going to get a full version and start right in doing 3D piping layouts. He's a process chemical engineering intern and the only sketches he needs to do are 2D. Interns get the scut work.

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PotGuy
I guess he thought he was going to get a full version and start right in doing 3D piping layouts. He's a process chemical engineering intern and the only sketches he needs to do are 2D. Interns get the scut work.

 

From humble beginings...

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PotGuy
When I mentioned working on blow-back mylars, reverse printed to a coworker the other day he just had this weird blank look on his face. Then I hit him with pin-bar registration and he ran from the room screaming. Poor guy.

 

Err...:unsure:

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ReMark

You never had a mock up of a drawing (usually paper images or "Standpat" photographed creating a negative and then had the negative blown back onto washoff mylar (reverse reading of course)?

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PotGuy

No...:oops:

 

People are complaining they feel old; at least they don't feel inadequate w/ lack of knowldge! :P

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ReMark

Maybe every CAD course should have an hour devoted to manual drafting and what it took to create a drawing prior to the advent of computers and CAD programs. I think students/newbies would have a better appreciation for the tools they have today and spend less time complaining that it is too difficult to do something or asking if there is an "easy" or "magic" button to complete some task. Their type are just a bunch of cry babies if you ask me.

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PotGuy

I did. One of my units were about manual draughting. I enjoyed it as it was both different and learnt a few methods I could apply to AutoCAD. it was easier in AutoCAD, but I appreciated the effort that goes into a hand draughted drawing and the tools needed.

 

Processes such as ammonia reproduction was not mentioned or anything on that side of hand draughting.

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ReMark

If you ever have the opportunity or desire find a book called "Systems Drafting: Creative Reprographics for Architects and Engineers" by Fred A. Stitt. I used to call it "scissors" drafting. It's all about the fine art of mocking up a drawing using various reprographic techniques. I used to have a copy but a water leak in the ceiling above my desk ultimately led to its demise.

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PotGuy

It couldn't hurt to have a look. The area on reprographic techniques did somewhat catch my eye.

 

One of those things. :)

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