Jump to content
pjd1001

Creating a Viewport within a viewport

Recommended Posts

pjd1001

Hi all,

 

I need to create a smaller viewport within a larger viewport so that the larger viewport is not visible within the background of the smaller one. 


Any help is gratefully received. I'm using AutoCAD LT 2021.


Best regards


Phil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
f700es

As far as I know you can't. You can make it look like it's inside of another but that's about it. If there is a way it would be new to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CyberAngel

I've made insets, that is, close-ups of areas in the main plan. It's not hard, just create a second, smaller viewport and put it somewhere to the side. If you need to edit something inside the smaller viewport, select it and press the Paper/Model button. For bonus style points, create an object-type frame with a circle, put another circle around the source area, draw a line center to center, and trim it to the frames.

 

If you don't have an open space to put your inset, use a polygonal viewport for the main frame and draw it around the inset. Here's a diagram:

 

 

inset.JPG

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
f700es

Yep, only way I've ever had success with. Thanks Cyber

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
steven-g

And put the viewport on a non plotting layer or the defpoint layer so it doesn't plot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
guran

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbEF6GqokPw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pjd1001

Thanks everyone! Cyber - That's genius! Thanks for that.


All the best

 

Phil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pjd1001
20 hours ago, steven-g said:

And put the viewport on a non plotting layer or the defpoint layer so it doesn't plot.

Thanks for that point Steven. Great advice all round.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dana W

You could put a wipeout between the two viewports, the easiest solution.  Draw it over the small one, then draw order, under object, (move it under the small one).  Just make sure you don't set the wipeout color to 255, use index 7 (white).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BIGAL

Dana can you explain how I could not get it to work. "Move it under" ? Just did not seem to be supported for a viewport 2020.

Edited by BIGAL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dana W

Hmmmm.  I change the draw order of viewports all the time.  It irks me when the layout border covers them up.  I'll have to try it out again first.  I am away from my CAD machine.  I know I have done it recently.  

Edited by Dana W

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dana W
23 hours ago, BIGAL said:

Dana can you explain how I could not get it to work. "Move it under" ? Just did not seem to be supported for a viewport 2020.

I can't get it to work either, 2021.  I have tried everything I know.  Apparently viewports don't respond to draw order.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dtkell

I've been carrying this around for a while.
I haven't tried this for a long time, but I don't see why it shouldn't work now.

 

CREATING A CIRCULAR VIEWPORT COMPLETELY CONTAINED WITHIN A LARGER RECTANGULAR VIEWPORT
Nov 01 2014
Solution:
Let's say you want to create a circular viewport completely contained within a larger rectangular one. You don’t want objects displayed in the rectangular viewport showing through the circular one.
Here's what you can do:
1. In a layout viewport, create a rectangle and a circle within it.
2. Create a copy of the circle in the same location as the original circle (use COPY 0,0).
3. Convert all three objects into regions using the REGION command.
4. Subtract one of the circular regions from the rectangular one with the SUBTRACT command.
5. Enter the MVIEW command and specify the Object option. Select the rectangular region, converting it into a viewport with a "hole" in it.
6. Repeat the MVIEW command selecting the remaining circular region. This converts it into a separate circular viewport that fills the hole in the previous one.
Tip submitted by:
Dieter Schlaepfer, Autodesk, Inc.
 

If you don't want the smaller VP round it should also work with a rectangular VP.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dana W

My wipeout method involves locating the wipeout in modelspace, over the area to be blanked out.  I couldn't remember it at first, been a long time. Not always convenient, but it works.

Edited by Dana W

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...