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Coosbaylumber
27th Jul 2009, 03:25 pm
I was recently told at another forum that Autocad training is dead, attendance in classes is on a downslope and lagging, that Community College courses are now aimed towards Catia and Solidworks because that is what industry uses today.


Wm.

rkent
27th Jul 2009, 03:33 pm
I was recently told at another forum that Autocad training is dead, attendance in classes is on a downslope and lagging, that Community College courses are now aimed towards Catia and Solidworks because that is what industry uses today.
Wm.

Greatly depends on what you mean by "industry". There are lots of different uses for CAD software. There is a definite push towards 3D for Arch and MEP and of course manufactured parts. Also depends on what part of the world/country you are in and who the client is. US government leans towards Microstaton for A/M/E/P and Solidworks for parts; in my part of the US anyway.

There are lots of companies using Inventor instead of Solidworks, and Catia is very expensive and high end so you won't see a lot of that, again depending on location and other factors.

I don't doubt the use of AutoCAD is declining, Autodesk itself is trying to move people to 3D products like Revit and Inventor.

Tankman
27th Jul 2009, 03:44 pm
I was recently told at another forum that Autocad training is dead, attendance in classes is on a downslope and lagging, that Community College courses are now aimed toward Catia and Solidworks because that is what industry uses today.

AutoCAD will never be gone. There'll always be us old-timers using the program for what we need to do. At least until retirement at which time we'll be teaching our grandchildren. Got to love 'em!

AutoCAD training is everywhere I turn. 'Specially here in the cadturor forums! :geek:

I still miss my Erector Set, cry when I think about it!

DANIEL
27th Jul 2009, 04:06 pm
just your typical autodesk conspiracy lol

JD Mather
27th Jul 2009, 05:38 pm
I was recently told at another forum

You forgot to include the url link to the source of the information. Unsubstantiated, unreferrenced information is useless.

ReMark
27th Jul 2009, 05:55 pm
AutoCAD dead? I wouldn't bet on it just yet. Just run a search on the words "autocad training" or "autocad training online" and you'll see what I mean. I could see AutoDesk morphing it into something else though I'm not sure at this point what it could be. How about Inventor SuperLT? LOL.

Coosbaylumber
27th Jul 2009, 06:03 pm
Greatly depends on what you mean by "industry". There are lots of different uses for CAD software. There is a definite push towards 3D for Arch and MEP and of course manufactured parts. Also depends on what part of the world/country you are in and who the client is. US government leans towards Microstaton for A/M/E/P and Solidworks for parts; in my part of the US anyway.

There are lots of companies using Inventor instead of Solidworks, and Catia is very expensive and high end so you won't see a lot of that, again depending on location and other factors.

I don't doubt the use of AutoCAD is declining, Autodesk itself is trying to move people to 3D products like Revit and Inventor.


I cannot remember, but think the guys answering were from aerospace Industry near to San Diego.



Wm.

Tankman
27th Jul 2009, 07:17 pm
I cannot remember, but think the guys answering were from aerospace industry near to San Diego.

Office "people", AutoCAD isn't going anywhere today. :)

CadDan
27th Jul 2009, 07:21 pm
Autocad is far from dead. There is still teachings of it and seminars for it.

Cad64
27th Jul 2009, 08:56 pm
Don't believe everything you read on internet forums. :P

Declining attendance could just be due to our current economic state. And as for Catia and Solidworks being what the "Industry" uses, what industry were they talking about? Those programs are certainly not used in the Architectural Industry. I don't really see Autocad going anywhere in the near or distant future.

JD Mather
27th Jul 2009, 09:24 pm
I cannot remember, but think the guys answering were from aerospace Industry near to San Diego.

Earlier you stated you saw this information on another forum. Provide the url link and I'll figure out for myself what industry they are from. Simple.

The aerospace industry might use specific tools more than others. Not sure that reflects use in the rest of the world.

NaeKid
28th Jul 2009, 05:38 pm
As long as I have a job I will probably use AutoCAD. I do the design-work for 2D cutting and forming of steel. I have tried to use / import / work-with drawings done in SolidWorks and the drawings by SolidWorks don't normally work with our lasers and breaks unless I "massage" the design first.

To save time - its faster to draw it out in AutoCAD and then fire off the drawings to the machines.