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aczeller

Revit Training on Wednesday

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aczeller

So my company is sending me to training in Denver. Classes start Wednesday, 5/13/09 and end the following Friday afternoon. The class is aimed towards Revit MEP. Does anyone have any input/tips/tricks/questions that I should try to bring up when I am there? it's a $1300 class, plus the hotel, mileage, etc, so i would like to give my boss the best bang for the buck he can get. I have opened up the program, saw a few buttons, played with it a little bit, but i have no clue what I am doing with it exactly. We are currently using AutoCAD MEP 2010, but they are sending me to training to see if there is any major benefit to also using Revit MEP. We already have the software on subscription, but since we have been able to get by with AutoCAD MEP, we havn't looked too seriously at Revit. After watching the webcasts for the launch of the 2010 series of programs, it looks like Revit may be a good thing to learn and start to use, as long as it's beneficial to our company.

 

We are a mechanical contractor and sometimes the mechanical engineer on design/build jobs. If anyone has anything that would help me go through training with a better understanding of the software, it would be greatly appreciated.

 

Later,

Andy

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Noahma

Where are you taking the training? If you need any info about what is within Denver when you are not in class, send me a PM. I live about 10 miles north of Denver

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aczeller

thanks buddy! I work for Midlands Mechanical. we have an office there somewhere, but i'll be honest, i have never been out to that office yet. I'm in Omaha, NE. The training is at CAD-1 just north of 120th & Pennsylvania if I remember correctly. I'm taking it with another guy that is in our Denver office, but his main job is PM. he does most of their CAD work out there though since it's hard for me to make an 8 hour drive to get measurements every week. lol

 

Later,

Andy

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aczeller

BTW, CAD-1 is in Thornton, if that's spelled correctly

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boofredlay

We use Revit in our Architecture firm so my advice might be a bit slanted. However, if it is anything like the training we went through, pay close attention to the steps as it is easy to get lost. But once you grasp a concept and how to implement it then you are golden.

 

If you cover worksharing this is a big bonus. Worksharing allows many people to work on the same file, saving updates back to a central file. Take notes but again, it is worth learning.

 

I encourage your firm to take Revit on full force. When we went to Revit the majority of the office did so without looking back. there are a couple PM's who still rely on Acad but we are working on them :)

 

We have yet to work on a project where the engineers use Revit. We might get our chance if we win a proposal we are working on now as the structural engineer wants it to be his first Revit project. I hope we get it. Being able to share the model with the engineers and have live updates through the web can prove very useful and time saving.

 

There is a learning curve but it is worth it. Good luck.

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Noahma
BTW, CAD-1 is in Thornton, if that's spelled correctly

 

yep, spelled correctly. They are up the street from my home, and our office reseller. Great guys over there.

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Cad64

I just got out of a meeting with our Autodesk rep, and his 3D consultant, and it looks like I will be getting at least one seat of Revit Architecture to try out. They really sold the whole BIM thing, the ease of 3D modeling and the transfer of files to Studio Max via the .fbx format. It sounds like it might be a pretty good tool to add to my collection. :D

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ARCHdoc

Revit is certainly a good program to use. Be very careful however, it will not happen overnight. There is a very steep learning curve which can be very expensive in time and money. If all of your directors are not behind you or Revit it will be difficult to impliment in your office.

I think some of the key questioins to ask would be "how do I reach my office standards with Revit" with regard to lineweights, annotation etc. The physical modelling will come over time, it's getting the final product to look correct that will drive you mad. Good luck and take tons of notes.

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aczeller

yeah... after taking the class and learning it's abilities and limitations, we have decided that any project that requires Revit will also have to be drawn in AutoCAD MEP. After all the BS that it takes to convert the file and then find out that it doesn't convert everything so that we can use it for fabrication prints, it's just not worth our time to use it for our specific uses.

 

don;t get me wrong... it's a great program, very well built, and very powerful in what it can do, but with it's limited content and abilities to create usable fabrication prints, it's just not in our best interest to use it. I can definitely see a major benefit for architects and engineers to use it. It's a great design tool, but it's just not built for contractors quite yet. We are monitoring it however, waiting for the day that it can do what we need it to... as soon as we can start doing fab prints and don't have to create every other piece of content that we want to draw, we will be sitting pretty.

 

Later,

Andy

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ARCHdoc

I think the issue with MEP and structure was that it all came out of Revit Architecture (there only ever used to be one program) and has not really been fully developed to date. The latest release of Revit saw some good improvements to MEP and Structure, not so much in Architecture, so i think Autodesk may be trying to get them to a level playing field (will take a bit of time though). Another point is to trawl the net for tutorials, hints, tips and tricks on forums like these and others, AUGI, The Revit Kid etc etc. These are invaluable for gaining knowledge and all it costs you is an internet connection and some time.

Hang on and enjoy the ride.

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Zorg

Not sure how long it will take Revit MEP to take off in the engineering industry, if it ever does. It certainly is a good product from what i've seen but the MEP version i still think just wont size up to CADDuct, which is for the more hardcore users like myself.

 

I haven't explored Revit's possibilitys really, i just like plain old vanilla with a dash of chocolate sauce 8)

 

Z

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