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GIB39

Revit to autodesk MEP and vice versa

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GIB39

Im relatively new to both software packages but is it possible to import revit into a autodesk model and vice versa.

 

If not which is the way forward Revit or autodesk MEP for future BIM projects?

 

Thanks

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RobDraw

The two platforms are not inter-operable.

 

AutoCAD does not do BIM. So Revit is the way to go.

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tzframpton

I agree with Rob. "BIM" (aka Building Information Modeling) was was actually deployed as a marketing strategy from Autodesk to promote Revit back in 2002. So, Revit "is" BIM. AutoCAD based products are incapable of the true BIM process so nix AutoCAD and look into Revit.

 

-Tannar

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GIB39

BIM is something I'm not too familiar with tbh but its something i need to understand asap particularly what it can and can't do. Surley Autodesk MEP is BIM compliant depending upon what level of BIM is required. Is that correct?

 

One other thing. What is the best way to become familiar with the BIM process and Revit. I've done the basic Revit autodesk course but that only touched the surface so to speak!! Thanks again.

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GIB39

It's a mine field really. Quite daunting for a beginner who is use to 2D AutoCAD.

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tzframpton
Surley Autodesk MEP is BIM compliant depending upon what level of BIM is required. Is that correct?
This is not correct. AutoCAD MEP is not parametric, nor is it a collaborative-capable platform, thus cannot be true BIM. It is partial compatibility with certain aspects that the BIM process is made up of (IFC objects, individual parametric parts, object based informational embedding, etc), but either a software is 100% compliant with BIM or it's not BIM.

 

What AutoCAD MEP is, is a copy-cat of the Revit MEP platform in certain areas of functionality. It provides you with great tools to generate 3D models, which gives you something called "3D Spatial" models but not "BIM". The #1 item that nixes AMEP as BIM is the fact that only one user can access a DWG file at one time. Revit is different, containing a centralized model that anybody can access at the same time, which in turn gives you a true collaborative environment previously unheard of with CAD applications for the AEC industry.

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nestly
Surley Autodesk MEP is BIM compliant depending upon what level of BIM is required. Is that correct?

 

Yeah, it was, until the Revit guys redefined BIM to mean the same level of integration as Revit.

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tzframpton

How is that possible when AMEP showed up after Revit and BIM arrived on the scene?

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nestly

The Revit crowd is getting bigger and louder. ;)

 

There's an abundance of "BIM" classes in the Autodesk University archives for AutoCAD vertical products, so clearly someone is redefining "BIM"

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RobDraw

Just in case you didn't read it, this from Wikipedia:

 

BIM Software

Due to the complexity of gathering all the relevant information when working with BIM on a building project some companies have developed software designed specifically to work in a BIM framework. These packages (e.g.: Autodesk Revit, ARCHIBUS EIM with BIM 4.0, ArchiCAD) differ from architectural drafting tools such as AutoCAD and VectorWorks by allowing the addition of further information (time, cost, manufacturers' details, sustainability and maintenance information, etc.) to the building model.

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tzframpton
The Revit crowd is getting bigger and louder. ;)
Maybe so, but the AutoCAD crowd is getting smaller and crying louder.

 

There's an abundance of "BIM" classes in the Autodesk University archives for AutoCAD vertical products, so clearly someone is redefining "BIM"
I'll agree that the term "BIM" has been severely exploited. Severely. Let's set aside this acronym for a moment... since there's so many differences in definitions.

 

AutoCAD vertical products, at it's core, is a non-collaborative drawing application. Revit, at it's core, is a collaborative database. Neither of these two applications are directly comparable in any way. If this is true, and agreeable, then why would any term (BIM or otherwise) be used to compare them? BIM (or, "insert catchy marketing term here") equals Revit, therefore it does not equal AutoCAD and/or the subsequent vertical products.... and vice versa.

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RobDraw

So, you started off by saying to drop the term and follow it up by using it twice. The term has a definition and agreed it is misused, but what is key is the words around it. AutoCAD can be a part if the BIM process but it is not capable of being the process.

 

When it comes to a "catchy marketing term", it starts to become meaningless because of the words around it. There is a big difference between, BIM compatible and BIM capable. Many programs can be a part of the process but few can run the process.

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tzframpton
AutoCAD can be a part of the BIM process but it is not capable of being the process.
That's a really good way to put it actually. Revit "is" the process, and AutoCAD can do nothing more but be part of the process. But that still may be giving AutoCAD too much credit and is misleading, which is why most people do not credit AutoCAD at all.

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