Jump to content
Solvax

Rectangular 3D solid with higher center part

Recommended Posts

Solvax

Hello Experts,

 

I am drawing a 3D-solid 50x50 units with thickness 0,3 units

I want the outer part of this shape (20 units) to be 0,3 units lower than the center part which measures 30x30 units

 

In 3D rendering software I can easlity do this by knifing the shape and then moving the lines/dots/polygons.. but no idea how it's done in AutoCAD.

 

The 'REVOLVE'-command gets me the closest, but this only works to obtain round base shapes..

 

Can anyone advise me?

 

Thanks you for your time!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ReMark

Attach a copy of the drawing to your next post and someone here will have a look at it. We need a .dwg file not an image file. Thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Solvax

I cannot add a dwg file because I cannot draw this simple shape.

I just want to have a square 3D solid with a lower (square) inner part.

The dimensions don't matter, it's just about how to achieve this.

 

Can anyone advise me on how to draw this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BIGAL

Draw it or scribble on a bit of paper what you want and post, you can post a jpg etc as an attachment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cad64

I just want to have a square 3D solid with a lower (square) inner part.

 

I think he wants to create something like what I'm showing below, where the center blue area is lower than the outer edges. I made this in 3ds Max, where objects like this are dead simple to create, but in Autocad, not so easy.

 

One way to create this object would be to make 2 solids and subtract one from the other. I'm not an expert with Autocad 3D though, so maybe someone else will have a simpler solution.

Box.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dadgad
I think he wants to create something like what I'm showing below, where the center blue area is lower than the outer edges. I made this in 3ds Max, where objects like this are dead simple to create, but in Autocad, not so easy.

 

One way to create this object would be to make 2 solids and subtract one from the other. I'm not an expert with Autocad 3D though, so maybe someone else will have a simpler solution.

 

It sounds to me like three objects would be required to create this by Subtraction, since the thickness of the material is only 0.3 units, which is the same as the differential described between the inside and outer edges.

 

There would need to be two objects subtracted, one from above the desired part, and another from below it. :|

 

Bored, no work, I modeled it for you in Metric (mms).

I used LOFT to generate the RED subtraction bit, from the pair of concentric squares to the left, after moving the smaller square up by 0.3 mms.

I subracted a copy of that Red part from a copy of the GREEN block to generate the other subtraction bit. The GRAY piece later shown as BLUE is shown aligned properly with the other two bits, to the left of the Yellow circle, just before the SUBTRACT command, which will create the final part shown in the Yellow circle.

 

Probably more fluid and modern ways to do it, possibly with Surface modeling, which I have never done.

This is one old school way to go, hope it helps you. :beer:

 

Having not had work earlier, and being curious, I modeled this again.

I tried this time with SWEEP utilizing the PATH option. Definitely the way to go.

Screenshot is changed, as is the dwg attachment.

The yellow Solid at the top was created by sweeping the closed yellow linework along the 50x50 closed polyline.

Painless, much better. :beer:

Rectangular 3D Solid with higher center area.dwg

rectangular 3D solid with higher center area.jpg

Edited by Dadgad

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BIGAL

Maybe pyramid makes the top shape then subtract from full height solid. "Pyramid" allows for truncated height.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
steven-g

Two rectangles, extrude and subtract the inner one to get a square 'donut' and then the chamfer command using two distances of 0.3 and 10 works perfectly, picking one inner surface at a time, it's just a matter of selecting the edge a couple of times. I did two opposite edges first and then the last two automatically created the mitre.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dadgad
Two rectangles, extrude and subtract the inner one to get a square 'donut' and then the chamfer command using two distances of 0.3 and 10 works perfectly, picking one inner surface at a time, it's just a matter of selecting the edge a couple of times. I did two opposite edges first and then the last two automatically created the mitre.

 

Good one, never even considered Chamfer!

I still like SWEEP along Path though, really quick and easy. :beer:

 

Along the same lines as steven-g suggested, you could create the concentric squares, and use the PRESSPULL command, so no subtraction, then use the Chamfer approach. :beer:

Edited by Dadgad

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cad64

I still like SWEEP along Path though, really quick and easy. :beer:

 

I hadn't thought of that. Good idea. :thumbsup:

 

This is still much easier to do in other 3D programs though. I have no idea why Autocad doesn't have an "Inset" command, like every other 3D program.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...