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How do I rotate a sketch to another plane?


cvriv.charles
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I model this part and drew it on the wrong plane. I would love to just rotate it to another plane insatead of drawing it again.

 

Would it matter if I drew all my parts on the xy plane or should I draw on the plane that appropriate for a particular part?

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It shouldn't matter what plane you draw your parts on, using the right combination of contsraits, you should be able to line up the part to your desiered plane. Thats pretty much the whole point of constraits... making parts fit and interact in the desired manner... However, if its the only part in your assembly, try mating it to an origin plane, or draw a cube and mate it to the plane you want your part to line up with.

 

Ryan

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It doesn't really matter - all is relative.

 

But if you want to change the plane, simply right click on the sketch and select Redefine and then select the "correct" plane. (Keep in mind that you always select a plane by clicking it's edge - not somewhere on the plane.)

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and that you cant select a plane that was created after the fact in the model tree right JD? it needs to be moved up.

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I didnt think it matter all that much. I was thinking more towards the end after assembling everything. What the orientation of the assembled whatever would be. Having it backwards etc,... top is looking at bottom etc. Thanks guys.

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well in an assembly your mates are what will decide part orientation(not how you draw it). If you draw a component and select the face of another part or one of their planes(or one of the assembly planes) it will create a constraint with that plane.

 

If you do want to create a plane at an angle you just need a reference plane and a line(either a reference line, ie one of the x y or z axis). Your new plane will pivot around your reference line, and the angle will indicate its angle from the reference plane you selected. For instance if you turn on visibility of the Y axis and the YZ plane. Select Work Plane, or press ] , select your Y axis, then select your YZ plane(either in the model space or on your design tree). An angle prompt will appear and let you enter the angle for this plane.

 

You do not need a work axis, the line can be a sketch line or edge of a part.

IVplanes.jpg

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Thanks dude:) Another question for you. Say you have two objects each with a row of identical holes. I want ot mate those holes together. Do I have to create a constraint for each one of those holes or just lets say the two outer most holes?

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if you have a set of plates with a bolt pattern in each. after you constrain two holes, if you try to add more i am pretty sure you will get an over constrained error. Also when you are selecting the concentric constraint, you can select the edge of a circle on each or you can select the inner face of the hole.

 

so short answer, no you dont have to mate them all, and as always be careful with your selection process for edges/faces/points.

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if you have a set of plates with a bolt pattern in each. after you constrain two holes, if you try to add more i am pretty sure you will get an over constrained error. Also when you are selecting the concentric constraint, you can select the edge of a circle on each or you can select the inner face of the hole.

 

so short answer, no you dont have to mate them all, and as always be careful with your selection process for edges/faces/points.

 

Actually I didnt get a message saying anything about over constraining. I used the insert constraint even though im not inserting them. I click the outer most edges of all the holes and constrained them all. No error message. But it's makes sense that I dont have to but i don know,... I thought maybe I should for whatever reason.

 

Thanks shift:)

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I used the insert constraint and selected and edge from one circle and then selected the edge from the other circle on the other piece. Mates together just fine. But I wont get any errors if I constrain them all.

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I used the insert constraint and selected and edge from one circle and then selected the edge from the other circle on the other piece. Mates together just fine. But I wont get any errors if I constrain them all.

 

 

When your constraint window pops up there are 4 type options for standard mates, a few for motion mates and then transitional.

 

If you just go with the standard mate and select the edges of your holes, it will not be constrained how you think. I may be wrong but i use the insert constraint whenever i am trying to made holes together. Typically ill use the insert constraint for a bolt into one of the holes, then the insert constraint for that bolt in the other.

 

Try this. with two plates with a single hole in each in your assembly, use the constraint you have been using, ground one of the block and then try to move the other one around and see how it acts. Redo the constraint using the insert and select the appropriate hole edges and do the same thing and see how the block acts.

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When your constraint window pops up there are 4 type options for standard mates, a few for motion mates and then transitional.

 

If you just go with the standard mate and select the edges of your holes, it will not be constrained how you think. I may be wrong but i use the insert constraint whenever i am trying to made holes together. Typically ill use the insert constraint for a bolt into one of the holes, then the insert constraint for that bolt in the other.

 

Try this. with two plates with a single hole in each in your assembly, use the constraint you have been using, ground one of the block and then try to move the other one around and see how it acts. Redo the constraint using the insert and select the appropriate hole edges and do the same thing and see how the block acts.

 

 

Ok. I did it. With the mate constraint it take two steps or two constraints to do what the insert constraint can do in one step. That being that the parts can spin around the holes in which they were constrained.

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Think of constraining in terms of real life. How many faces/holes/lines/points would you need to secure to hold the parts in the orientation and location you want. Generally speaking; two holes/curves and one face/edge, three faces/edges (in any combination), one hole/curve and two faces/edges, etc...

 

If you know anything about GD&T it works very similarly.

 

Insert constraint is unique in that it actually places two constraints ( a surface mate and a centerline mate) in one command.

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  • 2 years later...
It doesn't really matter - all is relative.

 

But if you want to change the plane, simply right click on the sketch and select Redefine and then select the "correct" plane. (Keep in mind that you always select a plane by clicking it's edge - not somewhere on the plane.)

 

 

I was having about the same problem and your advise worked like a charm!

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