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Siberian

We're switching to Revit MEP. Now what?

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Siberian

My employer has decided to make the switch to Revit MEP. I'm used to good old AutoCAD og to some degree MEP, but Revit is completely new to me/us. Most projects around here aren't using BIM yet, but we're doing one right now where we've brought in some external consultants. Anyway, what are the first things I should know about it? I hear many people telling me it's "a completely different way of thinking", and that may be so, but that doesn't really tell me much. I do mostly piping systems and some ventilation. How will it work with traditional 2D dwgs that I still keep getting from most architects?

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tzframpton
Anyway, what are the first things I should know about it? I hear many people telling me it's "a completely different way of thinking", and that may be so, but that doesn't really tell me much.
This is accurate. It is completely different than AutoCAD. I don't even put them into the same category other than they both are CAD applications. When I first started using Revit MEP it was very frustrating. Once I gave up in my mind that it is not, and does not, work like AutoCAD, I started grasping the application.

 

How will it work with traditional 2D dwgs that I still keep getting from most architects?
Well... you can do it, but when you don't have a Revit architectural model, in my opinion it makes Revit MEP almost useless for the sub-contractor. Revit is an engineering application that has the ability to create (1) a BIM 3D model and (2) MEP plan drawings, and it works best with a Revit architectural model. It does NOT do a good job at creating "shop drawings" from a mechanical sub-contractor in my educated and experienced opinion.

 

Using Revit to produce shop drawings from an engineered set of plan documents is a beating in a few areas. First, time. It takes an enormous amount of time to set everything up where as in AutoCAD you just XREF a background and "draw". Second, computer horsepower. Revit is mind boggling as to the amount of processing power it needs. Small jobs are fine but large projects become very resource needy. Third, you still need AutoCAD. Revit has too many workarounds. For instance, you can't really "draw" in Revit. So, for details, you still need AutoCAD to produce details, schematics, certain detailed elevation/sections, etcetera for construction documents.

 

Here's my assessment after doing this for 5 years:

If you want "3D" or "BIM" for spatial coordination through the G.C. then go with AutoCAD MEP. Or, if you want to go forward with Revit MEP, then simply contact your reseller about acquiring the "Revit MEP Suite" which gives you Revit MEP, AutoCAD MEP, and AutoCAD - all in the same package. Plus, it's not that much more if you go with the suite. So, best of both worlds.

 

Hope this helps. :)

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