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Tony D

Can You Chamfer a Circle in an Isometric Drawing?

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Tony D

Can you chamfer a circle (used the ellipse command) in an isometric drawing, if so, how is it Done?

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rkent

Assuming you mean chamfer a cylinder, draw the smaller circle at the center of the larger one, then move the larger circle down by the proper amount, trim if needed, etc.

chamfer cylinder.jpg

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ReMark

Another option. Draw the whole thing in 3D and extract the 2D view using Flatshot, SectionPlane or SolProf.

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rkent

Or if we wait a while JD will tell the OP to use a modern CAD program like Inventor.;)

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Stryker1989

If you draw a cylinder can you not just use the CHAMFER command? Seems to work for me :unsure:

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ReMark
If you draw a cylinder can you not just use the CHAMFER command? Seems to work for me :unsure:

 

Depends. Are you doing this as an isometric as the OP stated? Why not post an image of your solution?

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ReMark

An example of a cylinder with a chamfer. It was done in 3D and the visual style set to Hidden.

 

Cylinder chamfer.jpg

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Stryker1989

yeah ReMark sorry I was doing it as you have done it in your image, drawing a 3D cylinder in the 2D top view (only shoing a circle) then switching to the SW Isometric View and using the CHAMFER command.

 

Not entirely sure what is meant by 'chamfer a circle' if it doesn't mean chamfer a cylinder.

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rkent

Stryker1989 - the OP asked about isometric drawing methods (2D) and not 3D.

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ReMark

I guess I also should have noted that I used a SE isometric view for my cylinder in post #7.

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Tony D

I still haven't gotten a straight answer to this question posted on Wednesday, 08-31-2011:

Can you chamfer a circle (used the ellipse command) in an isometric drawing, if so, how is it Done?

If it can be done, I would like step by step instructions, if it can't be done then let me know.

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rkent
I still haven't gotten a straight answer to this question posted on Wednesday, 08-31-2011:

If it can be done, I would like step by step instructions, if it can't be done then let me know.

 

Seriously? The first post told you exactly how to do it, step by step, with two examples.

 

If that is not what you are after then you need to post the question better so we can understand what you are after.

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ReMark

I thought the question was answered as well.

 

Post an image of what you're working on.

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BlackBox

Tony, FWIW - some may interpret the *tone* of your last post as being impatient, and/or rude.

 

Typically when someone *talks* that way, I choose to respond by asking them to tell *us* what happens when they attempt this themselves. Not knowing for sure, I am willing to give you the benefit of the doubt. :)

 

Now, perhaps this will help to clarify:

 

Command: cha
CHAMFER
(TRIM mode) Current chamfer Dist1 = 0.0000, Dist2 = 0.0000
Select first line or [undo/Polyline/Distance/Angle/Trim/mEthod/Multiple]: [color=blue]<SelectsLine>[/color]
Select second line or shift-select to apply corner: [color=blue]<SelectsEllipse>[/color]
[color=red]Cannot chamfer between these two entities.[/color]

 

CT_chamfer.png

 

By definition a circle is not an ellipses, nor a cylinder, sphere, or the like. Perhaps a little more acuracy in the question's wording, or even a sample drawing being posted will yield the desired result more quickly in the future.

 

HTH

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Jeff H

Here is a step by step instruction

 

Type chamfer in commandline then press F1

 

It TELLS exactly what you can chamfer.

 

As far as Isometric what difference does that make besides using ellipses to represent circles.

 

I guess since you are supposed to use ellipses to represent circles in a isometric drawing your asking can you use chamfer on a ellipse?

The definition of Chamfer

A chamfer connects two objects to meet in a flattened or beveled corner.

A chamfer connects two objects with an angled line. It is usually used to represent a beveled edge on a corner.

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Car5858

TonyD

 

It can be done.

Iso circle.jpg

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paulmcz

TonyD, another method here:

CylChamferIso.jpg

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Stryker1989

I still don't quite get the question that is being asked as it is the shortest explanation of what is trying to be achieved that I have seen so far but if the above posts don't answer the question then I'm completely lost.

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paulmcz

A straight answer:

 

A circle in isometric drawing is represented by an ellipse. Neither ellipse nor circle can be chamfered.

 

It is assumed here that the OP meant a cylinder rather than a circle or an ellipse. So far, OP didn't confirm that to be the case.

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paulmcz

It is very common in this forum that the OP forces the people here to guess what he/she means by being either extremely brief, inaccurate or expressing himself/herself incomprehensively.

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