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Putting tutorials to use..


chrisrep

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Hi Guys,, Im someone who is quite new to autocad and a very new member of the site. As a new user who is basically trying to self teach myself how to use autocad I have looked at and tried to follow almost every tutorial I can get my head round. The problem is that following tutorials seems to be a little like learning parrot fashion. I want some kind of small project where I need to put the tutorials to use. Like turning a 2d dimensioned image into 3d or something along those lines. I think alot of beginners would be interested in trying projects like this if they were included on the site with an area for discussion where we could help eachother with the project or get tips from the gurus.;)

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Well as I mentioned before I am new to autocad (1st started using it in mid September), so as of yet I'm not really sure what exact direction to go with it. So far I have been doing drawings of basic floor plans and elevations and also trying some 3d bolts and things like that. Really I just want drawings that will test what I have been trying to pick up in the tutorials. Not just for myself btw, but I think alot of beginners would benefit from some kind of feature like this on the site. After having done a few ISO and UNC bolts its amazing how difficult it is to find accurately dimensioned images online to test yourself with.

 

Thx for replies :)

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Yes I think the library was to be my next option having found it so difficult to find something online. Could you please suggest some titles I could check out as I've not seen your previous posts.

 

Thx Remark

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I would "suggest" you look at the thread that I have graciously provided the link to in my previous post. The Spencer and French books are "old school" meaning they were written before the advent of CAD. The Bertoline book was written with CAD in mind.

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Thank you, these books do sound as though they will contain what I am looking for. Though I would suggest that having a section on the site which contains test materials like this would be more helpful to beginners that simply telling them, don't come here, go to the library.

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CADTutor doesn't bill itself as a test site. If you really want to be tested then apply for a job and see what kind of "test" they throw at you. Nothing like some real world experience to get you focused. Another option would be to sign up for an AutoCAD course either online or at your local community college. You'll be tested regularly with assignments and final projects. If you're looking for a skills test re: AutoCAD then check out the AutoDesk website. You can "test" for AutoDesk recognition and become a "certified" expert.

 

Here you go....

 

http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/index?id=14238652&siteID=123112

 

You want a test? Draw a floor plan for a house that Habitat for Humanity might build. It has to be wheel-chair accessible. Create all the necessary plans including those for the foundation, electrical and roofing. Do not forget to include elevations of all four sides, a cut-away showing a typical wall section, details, along with a window and door schedule. A mini-site plan should be included as well. Base it upon the property you live at now. All drawings must be fully dimensioned and carry all pertinent notes regarding materials used. Do all this in 2D then finish the project off with a 3D version, with applied materials and rendered. Come back when you are done and post your work. We'll comment upon it and then give you a grade. To keep it simple let's make it a one-story ranch. No garage.

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Thank you for the suggestion LOL, maybe when I have been using autocad for a little longer I will attempt your test. But for now I will try to find some materials to bridge the gap between the level I'm at and the test you set. I am already enrolled on a course at my local tech btw, but finding the course materials to be very basic. Just looking for some online help to increase my understanding in a structured way.

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I could easily come up with a few more "tests" for you. Just say the word. You can also mention to your teacher that you find the course less-than-challenging and ask for some tougher assignments. It's a good way to score brownie-points and it may even surprise him. Good luck with your course.

 

One more test for you.

 

A full assembly drawing of a Swingline 747 Classic stapler. Draw up every part of the stapler in 3D and derive the 2D views of the stapler from the 3D object. Do not draw the 2D views yourself. You can choose to use any of the following methods:

 

1. SectionPlane

2. Flatshot

3. SolView and SolDraw

4. SolProf

5. BaseView

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tzframpton

1. Why are you wanting to learn AutoCAD? (Just curious, do you want to use it for personal use or are you trying to make a career choice)

 

2. AutoCAD usually is hard to use unless you have a purpose behind what you're drawing. My suggestion is simply to pick normal household items to start with. There is all kinds of fun stuff you can re-create and if you want to know the best approach, or if you're completely stumped on where to begin or how to get past a certain scenario in what you're drawing, that's where this forum becomes priceless in the free help you'll find through discussions with experienced people.

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Well as a career choice I think, (brought on by quite a long period of unemployment). I checked out the courses available at my local college and thought autocad would be something I could get into. Tbh I'm loving it so far but I'm not sure what area to concentrate on. I think I'm tending to lean a little towards the mechanical side though. I tried drawing some objects from my home but found accurately measuring them to be a problem. Somewhere I can find fully dimensioned drawings of things like vices or gear assemblies would be helpful. I will try to find the books ReMark sugguested at my local library asap.

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tzframpton

Dimensions don't have to be dead on accurate. For instance, redraw the face of a calculator. That could teach you the following tools and command in AutoCAD very easily:

  • Line
  • Polyline
  • Rectangle
  • Fillet
  • Text
  • Trim
  • Extend
  • Color
  • Snap Modes
  • etc

 

We're talking simple 2D stuff here. Also, it's wise to have some direction to point toward when it comes to what field you want to go into. Mechanical is good, that's the trade I'm in and there's always lots of work in this industry. But I'm not mechanical for machinery, I'm mechanical for HVAC and piping. If you want to do mechanical machinery then drop AutoCAD altogether and pick up Inventor or Solid Works since AutoCAD is considered stone age if you use it for machine parts or tool design.

 

8)

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Yes thx for the advice. I intend to finish the course I am enrolled on with autocad then probably move to inventor or some other more specialist program.

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