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j4cksincl4ir

Trying to justify Revit to Property developer employer

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j4cksincl4ir

My employer is developing quite a prestigious building which will be leased to a commercial tenant.

 

The design work will be done by an architectural firm. Once the construction has finished, I'll be doing building surveying/ property management and acting between landlord and tenant on technical matters.

 

I'd like to justify Revit and BIM to my employer. This project is so large that it would justify a purchase.

 

The reason I ask is that BIM from what I've heard seeks to connect the design and construction process with the life and management of the completed building.

 

From the little of what I have said, would Revit be useful for someone who represents an employer to architects then will represent an employer as a landlord to a future tenant?

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RobDraw

Does one project justify purchasing Revit? Probably not unless you plan on generating the models and charging a hefty fee for it. If the architect and building system designers/contractors are generating the models, you are probably more interested in using that information for monitoring the building. The information in the Revit models can be used in other programs such as a BMS.

 

I think you might be interested in BMS (Building Management System) in the landlord/tenant aspect. It's my understanding that the BIM models generated by the Architectural and MEP designers/contractors can be incorporated into the BMS giving the user(s) not only monitoring and control of the systems on the BMS but a smart 3D representation rather than just a graphical one.

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j4cksincl4ir

Thanks. Yes, it is such a large project that I thought that a purchase might have been justifiable.

 

What you say about the BMS side of things sounds interesting though from my end-user surveying/ property management perspective.

 

The building in question is going to be a medium-sized hotel so perhaps the BMS would help to manage the property.

 

Which computer program which is compatible with Revit has this BMS element?

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f700es

Archibus is one such program. Very expensive!

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rkent

Talk to your tax accountant for the business as I believe a computer and software bundle can be depreciated in one year. That should make the decision easier to justify from a cost stand point.

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j4cksincl4ir

Thanks for the information. I am still tempted to enroll on an Autodesk course to learn Revit.

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tzframpton
The reason I ask is that BIM from what I've heard seeks to connect the design and construction process with the life and management of the completed building.

 

From the little of what I have said, would Revit be useful for someone who represents an employer to architects then will represent an employer as a landlord to a future tenant?

This is contingent on the design/bid/build team. I would be certain that BIM be thoroughly discussed prior to any contracts being signed, so that both parties are well aware of the expectations of designing and handing over a complete Revit model, turn-key, to you and your employer.

 

If this does happen, then I'll say absolutely without a doubt this would be beneficial to your company as the property management representative & landlord. You or someone who fills the position would need to be efficient with Revit to a moderate degree at least. If so, then all the embedded information throughout the Revit model should reflect that of the live building itself.

 

A friend of mine is the BIM Manager for a reputable general contractor in the Dallas, TX area and they do this quite often.

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j4cksincl4ir
This is contingent on the design/bid/build team. I would be certain that BIM be thoroughly discussed prior to any contracts being signed, so that both parties are well aware of the expectations of designing and handing over a complete Revit model, turn-key, to you and your employer.

 

If this does happen, then I'll say absolutely without a doubt this would be beneficial to your company as the property management representative & landlord. You or someone who fills the position would need to be efficient with Revit to a moderate degree at least. If so, then all the embedded information throughout the Revit model should reflect that of the live building itself.

 

A friend of mine is the BIM Manager for a reputable general contractor in the Dallas, TX area and they do this quite often.

 

 

Thanks for this. It sounds very interesting but as the usefulness of Revit/ BIM will ultimately come down to my ability to use it in the construction stage but especially during the property management of a 80 room hotel.

 

I think the way to approach this is to do a night class and show my employer my work and Revit's BIM potential.

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tzframpton

Also look into Navisworks.

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PotGuy
Also look into Navisworks.

 

Isn't that a free viewer you can use on various Autodesk software files? :unsure:

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Mike_Taylor
Isn't that a free viewer you can use on various Autodesk software files? :unsure:

 

Its essentially a project management and collaboration tool that can simulate the entire construction process from the actually construction to logistics based around the construction. It can also do conflict analysis between different disciplines and markups directly in the model which can be shared with different disciplines.

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PotGuy
Its essentially a project management and collaboration tool that can simulate the entire construction process from the actually construction to logistics based around the construction. It can also do conflict analysis between different disciplines and markups directly in the model which can be shared with different disciplines.

 

Cheers Mike for your in-depth explanation. I've never had the need to use it, although it sounds quite nifty if you need to view a model and you don't have that software on hand, no?

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hertz hound
PotGuy:

Cheers Mike for your in-depth explanation. I've never had the need to use it, although it sounds quite nifty if you need to view a model and you don't have that software on hand, no?

In that case use TeklaBimSight. It is free. The only drawback is that you have to export all your model files to .ifc to be able to import them into Tekla. I have had problems with seeing converted .ifc files that were already converted to .dwg from other design software. Even when the .ifc file was created by exporting it from it's native software.

It does a great job of viewing the model without bringing your computer to its knees. It also does a great job with clash detection.

Navis is the Cadillac of this type of software in my opinion, especially if your other design software is made by Autodesk (no converting file types).

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