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Karuga

How to generate 3-view Orhtographic from 3D Model

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Karuga

I have a finished 3D model in AutoCAD (although I did import it from another program), and I want to create the standard orthographic views as easily as possible. This tutorial looked perfect http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-create-a-2d-view-from-a-3d-model-in-autocad.html but i ran into some trouble. At step 5, where it says to press Base or use the command VIEWBASE i get a window that will ask me to open up some kind of inventor file. The tutorial does not acknowledge this, but the rest of the instructions and result seem like just what I need!

 

Anybody know how to do it in this way or in some other easy way?

Any help is appreciated considering I need this as part of my project pretty soon. Please try and be clear and beginner friendly with instructions, I am only a student and have only been using AutoCAD for two years.

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nestly

Welcome to Cadtutor

 

Personally, I still prefer FLATSHOT for generating 2D documentation, but since you asked for "as easily as possible"...

 

Assuming the imported model is compatible, VIEWBASE should have options to create the view "From Model Space" or "From Inventor"

 

Viewbase.gif

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Marvin7

If you use VIEWBASE like Nestly showed, you might want to turn off "Auto Update" in the contextual ribbon. Occasionally, in AutoCAD 2013, when you change the geometry after the fact, AutoCAD's base views will crap out (the view will disappear) unpredictably. With "Auto Update" off, at least you'll know when a view has gone bad...because you were the one who initiated the update, allowing you to undo the updated view if you want to.

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Karuga

WTC Ortho.dwg

 

I saw the the two options that you mentioned, and I originally did choose 'From Model Space', but for some reason, it kept opening the inventor window as if I kept choosing the other option. I double checked it just now, and indeed I am not going insane. So, am I looking at a re-install as a possible solution?

 

Anyways I have attached my file, if anyone could see if there is something wrong with it but i doubt its that.

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Karuga

I guess learning FLATSHOT should be easier than figuring out why I cant press 'From Model Space' properly. If nothing else, I'll give it a try, thank you.

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nestly

I don't think there's a problem with your AutoCAD, I believe the issue is that the model is constructed of polymesh faces... objects that neither VIEWBASE nor FLATSHOT can project. I don't work with polymesh faces, I'm not sure what your options are?

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ReMark

Very interesting concept. Not that I fully understand it in its entirety but I see lots of potential. Anyway, my idea would be to trace over as much of your original design using closed polylines or 3Dpolylines and reproduce the model as a solid. Something similar to what is shown below. Each color represents a different layer.

 

WTC Ortho_1.jpg

 

I wasn't quite sure what you were attempting to do at the back of the structure so I did not proceed any further. If you care to explain it to me I'd make the necessary additions then upload/attach a copy of the drawing if you were interested. If not, that's OK. No offense will be taken. I'll just consign the file to the recycle bin.

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nestly

Maybe try Mesh to Solid lisp, or the free Polyhedral Mesh to Solid plugin for AutoCAD at the Autodesk App Store? (disclaimer: I haven't test either)

 

*edit M2S.lsp doesn't do what's needed in this case, however FLATSHOT does work after simply converting the Polyface Meshes to Meshes using MESHSMOOTH command.

Edited by nestly

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ReMark

WTC Ortho_2.jpg

Karuga: Does this work for you?

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Karuga

Wow that looks amazing! Because I have never done anything 3D in AutoCAD before (I normally play with baby toys like SketchUp, shame I know), I must admit I have hardly any idea what you are talking about with the 3D poly-lines and meshes.

 

How did you come to this final ortho? The remaining hiccup is that I will have to delete lines that wouldn't be visible (they are behind other faces) and replace them with dotted lines, but my poor 3D AutoCAD skills aren't about to let me do that. Are the faces in this ortho just the original 3D model rotated and lined up? Or are they 2D drawings now? If they are 2D could you please describe the process so I can try and learn it?

 

Meanwhile, I will try nestly's advice, though I must admit I don't completely understand it either.

 

Thanks for dealing with this complete incompetent! You guys are the best.

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nestly

Here's a demo and a summary of commands that should do if you're only interested in obtaining the ortho views

 

Explode the blocks

Use QSELECT to select all the Polyface Meshes and isolate them ( I move them away from the rest of the model )

Explode the remaining blocks (2x)

Use QSELECT to select the remaining Polyface Meshes and isolate them (move using the same displacement as previous)

Use MESHSMOOTH to convert the Polyface Meshes into "regular" Meshes

Adjust the view to represent what you want to project using the ViewCube

Use FLATSHOT to project the Meshes onto a single Plane and place the block

Adjust the view for the next projection and use FLATSHOT, returning to "Top View" before placing the block

Adjust the view for additional projections as needed and use FLATSHOT, remembering to always return to "Top View" to place the block

 

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Karuga

Thanks for the quick reply and amazing video! The instructions will be much easier to follow, although I don't even know what blocks and polyface meshes are, I'll do my best to follow your instructions that im sure have taken a lot of your time. I think understand. Are we working in the Model tab or Layout 1 tab? I am just wondering why your background is white and pretty. Does it make a difference when I follow the instructions?

 

Thank you once again, I am going to try it soon.

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nestly

It doesn't matter whether you work in Modelspace, or in a viewport in a Layout. Background color also doesn't matter, I just prefer to use white most of the time.

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gazza_au

Go to paper space, create 4 x view ports on a new layer with printer icon turned off.

select view and view style in each window.

WTC Ortho Layout1 (1).jpg

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ReMark

Re: Background.

 

Users can change the color of their model space background by going to Options > Display tab > Colors button and at the next window make sure that under Context you highlight 2D model space and under Interface element make sure Uniform background is highlighted. Then look to the right where it says Color. That's where you make your choice. The default "Black" is shown. After changing your color click on the Apply and Close button and at the next window click the OK button. To access Options start by clicking on this button in the upper left hand corner of your screen.

 

BrowserButton.JPGpencil.png

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ReMark

Karuga: I have not viewed nestly's video but I'm sure you should have no trouble following it which means you won't be using my method. However, I'll still try to answer your question as best I can.

 

How did you come to this final ortho? After recreating your model as a series of solids I used the View Base command. This is one of a handful of commands that will extract 2D views of 3D models. The 2D views are automatically constructed in a paper space layout not in model space.

 

Re: dotted lines. Also referred to as "hidden" lines. Maybe it is difficult to see in the posted image but lines that are hidden from view are shown where required, again automatically, as dashed. There is no need for the user to manually replace continuous lines with dashed lines.

 

3DPolylines can be drawn in any plane without the need for changing your UCS whereas regular polylines can only be drawn in one plane at a time.

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ReMark

I finally got a chance to watch nestly's video and the only thing I suggest you do differently is enable Show Obscured lines. I suggest using either the Dashed or Hidden linetype and to make the lines stand out visually I would pick a contrasting color like blue or black.

 

FlatshotHiddenLines.JPG

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nestly

Yep, I missed the part in post #10 stating the hidden lines were supposed to be displayed "dotted"

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