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david1-b

Perpendicular multileader advice

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david1-b

Hello,

 

This is outside my normal LISPing and I am in need so some advice.

 

My goal is to create (or modify) a multileader leader and landing line so they can be used to add perpendicular leaders to opposing sides of drawing features, as seen in the attached image. The reason for this is to improve the clarity of labeling (by having an additional leader style. I am not sure if this can be completed via LISP or a .net approach must be taken. Can anyone provide any advice?

 

Thanks

David

 

Leader.jpg

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BlackBox

FWIW -

 

Your 'desired multileader' is also known as a dimension; I say that as a LISP & .NET developer adept with MLeader Typed Objects.

 

The issue is that the end of the upper leader is in the opposite direction, and not connected to the actual MLeader itself. This is simply not possible via MLeader AFAIK. You can code an Object Reactor that would give the illusion of a Leader being bound to an MLeader, but would be indeterminably complex, and would only work for you (if the code behind was also loaded).

 

The only other non-Dimension related option potentiality I can think of is to implement the same objects noted previously via geometric constraints... Again, unnecessary complexity, when you could just tailor an OOTB Dimension Style.

 

HTH

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david1-b

Thanks a lot for the reply,

 

I was short on ideas on how to create the leader that is not connected to the text. I actually started with the dimension option, but as I was originally asked about a means of modifying our multileader I thought I would ask as a dimension and a multileader are not a 1:1 replacement. I see how the dimension can complete my goal, but I am unsure of how well the idea would go over of changing from labeling with multileaders to labeling with custom dimension blocks.

 

Thanks

David

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BlackBox

No worries; the only other alternative I can think of, is to use a simple to moderately complex dynamic block, which might afford you the flexibility you're after. It would easily support the ability to 'stretch' your arrow placement, while being linked together using OOTB functionality, and an attribute with field could serve as the dimension aspect of the label.

 

That should have been in my original post, but I only now thought of it, as I don't use many dynamic blocks for my work with C3D these days.

 

HTH

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Pietari

I have used this for a long time and it worked pretty good!

(the first program: how do I link a leader to an object)

It is freeware (and no I am not advertising:)).

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david1-b

Great,

 

I have a lot of options to follow up on and appreciate all the ideas. Even if you were advertising (and it was the solution) I would not mind ;).

 

David

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alanjt

I say go with both. When labeling such areas as easement lines, if the two lines are parallel, and large enough apart that an mleader with more than one arrow would look a little messy, I will add an aligned dimension, edit to include whatever additional text I may need, and go on with my business. As long as your MText, Dimension, Mleader styles (text, arrows) all match, no one will ever look at it and wonder why you suddenly decided to use a dimension rather than an mleader to label something. Hell, I recently had a building with several service doors (4 along each wall). I drew the extents of each service door, and then put in one aligned dimension from the farthest two ends of the 4 service doors, and then changed the text from the dimension length to say "Service Doors". It gave me a set of arrows pointing out what I was trying to label, it was parallel to the wall, and it looked nice.

Now that I've typed all that, I could have just shown a screenshot...if I wasn't too lazy to recreate.

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