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PotGuy

Site File - Moving the Project Base Point without changing the coordinates

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PotGuy

My company is finally looking to begin using Revit as a supplement for AutoCAD, as BIM is taking hold in the UK now. A part of the BEP, we have a Project Origin Point (0,0,0) which is located at the top of foundation. This project is very new.Currently, I've got hold of a dwg. which was accurately drawn to real world coordinates and orientation for the project. Its units are in mm. This issue for is that the point where the Project Base Point is found when Hidden Elements are shown is not over the point we need it to be. ie. It's found in the centre of the drawing, rather than over the point we need it to be over. (A ref point) This drawing was imported from centre to centre, as per this guide: http://autodesk-revit.blogspot.co.uk/2013/07/shared-coordinates.html Is there a way of moving the Project Origin Point so that we can put the project origin to 0,0,0 over that ref point, rather than the centre of the drawing?

Formatting seems to have got *cough* up my end, so sorry if this post doesn't come out as well as I'd hope. Work computer has limited certain online scripts etc. which are common use.

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tzframpton

Go to Visibility/Graphics > Model Categories tab > Site. Expand it, and make sure Survey Point and Project Base Point is checked.

 

Now you can move them wherever you need. Be advised that there is a difference in moving a Clipped and Unclipped SP or PBP. Read here: http://help.autodesk.com/view/RVT/2014/ENU/?guid=GUID-0625D4E1-4EE9-4848-8B44-73A75D1896DB

 

*EDIT*

Also, before you do anything, make sure that you linked in the CAD file using the "Origin to Origin" method.

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PotGuy

Many thanks for quick reply tz. Will follow up on this shortly, finishing off drawing my end.

That's interesting. You mentioned Origin to Origin, and not centre to centre, which is what the guide I'm using recommends which I linked into my OP.

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tzframpton
Many thanks for quick reply tz. Will follow up on this shortly, finishing off drawing my end.

That's interesting. You mentioned Origin to Origin, and not centre to centre, which is what the guide I'm using recommends which I linked into my OP.

The link you provided didn't work for me. Is that the "guide"? Anyways, Origin to Origin will establish both origin points once linked, which gives you an idea of how close or how far off the origin is between both projects. You mentioned Shared Coordinates, which is totally different. If you plan on using Shared Coordinates, then you link in using any method, because you're going to share the internal coordinate system then Unload, and Re-link the file to establish the origin.

 

I'm trying to make it more simple for you. :)

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PotGuy

Appreciated. The title in the hyperlink has shard coordinates, but in the tutorial there's no hide nor tail of it.Coming from an AutoCAD background, this is a really new way of thinking; rather than say 'it goes there', you need to tell Revit where everything is.

What's annoying right now is that an add-on apparently has stopped working, and doesn't let me paragraph my sentences! :ouch:

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PotGuy

Dagnamit. I got the link from you, but the page doesn't load.

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tzframpton
Coming from an AutoCAD background, this is a really new way of thinking; rather than say 'it goes there', you need to tell Revit where everything is.
Yeah, but if you think about it... it's WAY easier. Why not tell Revit where the origin is, instead of always dealing with a WCS that you cannot change?

 

:)

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PotGuy

That is a very, very good point. :beer:

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PotGuy

I'm looking for an option in Revit, so that when I input the Northings and Eastings, it doesn't round up my number to the nearest decimal point. (ie: 111,111.220 = 111,111.2E and 333,333.676 = 333,333,7)

Edited by PotGuy
Update

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tzframpton
I'm looking for an option in Revit, so that when I input the Northings and Eastings, it doesn't round up my number to the nearest decimal point. (ie: 111,111.220 = 111,111.2E and 333,333.676 = 333,333,7)
Type UN and change the units to the highest setting.

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PotGuy

As reliable as ever. :beer:

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PotGuy

Morning,Been looking at the various Units available for Revit, but haven't found one that uses the coordinate system I need. I'm looking at 'Decimal symbol/digit grouping', and it has 123,456,789.00 / 123 456 789.00 / 123,456,789,00 etc. etc. I'm not sure if I've missed something obvious here, but I need the 123,456.789 type of grouping, and it doesn't appear to be here.

Formatting my end is still broken here. :/

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tzframpton

When you type UN for Units, keep the Discipline drop down menu as "Common" and change the Length format. From there you can set the precision as well.

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PotGuy

Would not have figured that out for a while. As usual, many thanks. :)

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tzframpton
Would not have figured that out for a while. As usual, many thanks. :)
No worries at all.... that's why this forum exists.

 

In AutoCAD, units are global. You set it once and that's "it". But in Revit, you set units for everything, and there's plenty of different units of measurements that Revit calculates, beings that it's an engineering application as well. Just change the Discipline of the Project Units dialog and see all the different types of measurements to take into account. It can make you dizzy in a hurry if you're not familiar with it all!

 

8)

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PotGuy

Not sure if this is me doing something wrong right now, so here's where I am. The CAD file is accurate in coordinates and drawn to True North orientation. What's confusing me is that when I put in the coordinates of the Project Base point, rather than it being over REF 1 (Which is where the coordinates are in AutoCAD) it's a good distance away from it, even though the coordinates I input into the Project Base point is the same as the one in AutoCAD. So what I have right now is an imported dwg. from origin to origin that's coordinates don't align with the coordinates in Revit, even though I told Revit where the coordinates for the Project Base point is. I'm sure this is because I'm still not used to Revit, but it's completely stumped me.

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tzframpton
Not sure if this is me doing something wrong right now, so here's where I am. The CAD file is accurate in coordinates and drawn to True North orientation. What's confusing me is that when I put in the coordinates of the Project Base point, rather than it being over REF 1 (Which is where the coordinates are in AutoCAD) it's a good distance away from it, even though the coordinates I input into the Project Base point is the same as the one in AutoCAD. So what I have right now is an imported dwg. from origin to origin that's coordinates don't align with the coordinates in Revit, even though I told Revit where the coordinates for the Project Base point is. I'm sure this is because I'm still not used to Revit, but it's completely stumped me.
In AutoCAD, how far away is the Site Plan or Building Plan drawn in relation to the WCS 0,0,0 origin? Revit has a hard time with things drawn at extreme distances from the WCS origin.

 

Remove the DWG Link from your Revit project. Open a View from the Level you wish to use, and in Properties, change it to "True North". Turn on the Project Base Point (PBP) and type in the rotation angle of True North to match that of the DWG file. Now Link your DWG file, origin to origin. (Tip: in the DWG file at the WCS 0,0,0 origin, draw a cross-hair or something so you know where the origin is in Revit) If you need to move the PBP, then move it to the location you need but it should be fine from there. This will "orient" the project to match the True North of the DWG file. All you have to do is pick Project North in any View to realign the orientation of the project "upright".

 

Remember that you can Clip and Unclip your PBP before you move it. Think of a table with a vase sitting to one side of the table on a tablecloth. Moving an Unclipped PBP is like picking up the vase and moving it to the other end of the table. Keeping the PBP Clipped is like grabbing the tablecloth and moving it to the other end of the table, pulling the vase with it. In other words "project relocation" is the same as moving a Clipped PBP.

 

Just play around with it until you get the results you need.

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PotGuy
In AutoCAD, how far away is the Site Plan or Building Plan drawn in relation to the WCS 0,0,0 origin? Revit has a hard time with things drawn at extreme distances from the WCS origin.

 

Remove the DWG Link from your Revit project. Open a View from the Level you wish to use, and in Properties, change it to "True North". Turn on the Project Base Point (PBP) and type in the rotation angle of True North to match that of the DWG file. Now Link your DWG file, origin to origin. (Tip: in the DWG file at the WCS 0,0,0 origin, draw a cross-hair or something so you know where the origin is in Revit) If you need to move the PBP, then move it to the location you need but it should be fine from there. This will "orient" the project to match the True North of the DWG file. All you have to do is pick Project North in any View to realign the orientation of the project "upright".

 

Remember that you can Clip and Unclip your PBP before you move it. Think of a table with a vase sitting to one side of the table on a tablecloth. Moving an Unclipped PBP is like picking up the vase and moving it to the other end of the table. Keeping the PBP Clipped is like grabbing the tablecloth and moving it to the other end of the table, pulling the vase with it. In other words "project relocation" is the same as moving a Clipped PBP.

 

Just play around with it until you get the results you need.

 

Will have a play round with it. That's also confirmed my understanding of how the PBP works.

Also, the distance between the coordinates and the 0,0,0 point is 517248424.502mm. Probably an extreme distance.

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PotGuy

Would you say no to me first unclipping the PBP, putting the PBP coordinates in, then moving the linked CAD file before re-clipping it?

Have imported the file, ensuring it isn't rotated to my view having the view imported in facing True North?

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