Jump to content
Sengna

Scale: 1/4"=1'-0" on Modelspace?? Confuse??

Recommended Posts

Sengna

I received the drawing from the vendor, in model space, it said "Scale: 1/4"=1'-0" on the bottom that drawing, What does that mean? what confused me is that when i went to verify the dims on site, the distance of the 2 frame work Legs is 72" which is exactly match with the drawing. but the drawing on CAD said 1/4"=1'-0" on model space, will i still need to scale the drawing up

1 to 1 (true size)? Why put the scale on model space? I like to draw everything in true size and if need i use scale i want in paperspace. Any suggestion is appreciated

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tzframpton

The scale you're seeing is for Annotations only, and not model objects such as lines, circles, arcs, polylines, etc. The Annotation Scale is a visual tool only, adjusting things like Text Size, linetype spacing, etc to visually represent on screen what it would look like if it were to be printed at that scale from Paperspace.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sengna

So if i print out that drawing on Model space, will the drawing remain to scale or true size? i usally print my drawings in paperspace. thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tzframpton

Printing from Modelspace will utilize the "Plot Scale" section of the Plot dialog box. This is also true when plotting from Paperspace, but you have an additional factor for scaling which is the Viewport. In Modelspace, no more scaled Viewport objects, so it takes away this necessity.

 

Make sure it's set in the plot dialog box correctly and it'll be scaled accordingly. If you set the scale in Modelspace Annotative Scaling to match the Plot dialog box scaling, then as the annotative items appear in Modelspace on screen will look identical to the plotted paper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dana W
I received the drawing from the vendor, in model space, it said "Scale: 1/4"=1'-0" on the bottom that drawing, What does that mean? what confused me is that when i went to verify the dims on site, the distance of the 2 frame work Legs is 72" which is exactly match with the drawing. but the drawing on CAD said 1/4"=1'-0" on model space, will i still need to scale the drawing up

1 to 1 (true size)? Why put the scale on model space? I like to draw everything in true size and if need i use scale i want in paperspace. Any suggestion is appreciated

I worked in a shop where the modelspace objects were drawn to 1:1 scale, with a frame (rectangle) drawn around these objects in modelspace, and a text label placed under the frame in modelspace that said SCALE: 1/4" = 1'-0", or any other scale, depending on certain conditions.

 

The purpose was for information and paperspace set up only, indicating what the paperspace scale should be for a layout/viewport including everything within the rectangle drawn in modelspace. The shop standards were, room plan views all at 1/4" = 1'-0", all elevations at 1" = 1'-0", all sections at 1 1/2" = 1'-0" or 3" = 1'-0", so on an so on. These frames would also have the paperspace page numbers indicated in modelspace so they were easy to find, and easy to keep track of.

 

Each framed area in modelspace would have modelspace dimensions sized to fit the scale noted under the frame when placed in a viewport set to that scale. If all of the objects I wanted to draw on one page did not fit in one frame, I simply made a copy of the one I was working in, right next to it and continued on with another page.

 

Now, in paperspace I could set up a layout, create a viewport that exactly fit the innermost borderline of the template titleblock/border, activate the viewport, zoom window one of the framed areas while using the modelspace frame as a guide for the zoomed window. Then I would close the viewport, and give the viewport the scale that was noted in modelspace, and I was done.

 

This shop's template drawing already contained frames drawn for each scale commonly used, so I would only have to copy one, and draw within it, already knowing the scale, and dimension style I would need for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
eldon

I usually print from Model space, but on my drawings, I put a note that says the scale when printed on a certain sized sheet.

 

The OP's note has incomplete information :?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sengna
I worked in a shop where the modelspace objects were drawn to 1:1 scale, with a frame (rectangle) drawn around these objects in modelspace, and a text label placed under the frame in modelspace that said SCALE: 1/4" = 1'-0", or any other scale, depending on certain conditions.

 

The purpose was for information and paperspace set up only, indicating what the paperspace scale should be for a layout/viewport including everything within the rectangle drawn in modelspace. The shop standards were, room plan views all at 1/4" = 1'-0", all elevations at 1" = 1'-0", all sections at 1 1/2" = 1'-0" or 3" = 1'-0", so on an so on. These frames would also have the paperspace page numbers indicated in modelspace so they were easy to find, and easy to keep track of.

 

Each framed area in modelspace would have modelspace dimensions sized to fit the scale noted under the frame when placed in a viewport set to that scale. If all of the objects I wanted to draw on one page did not fit in one frame, I simply made a copy of the one I was working in, right next to it and continued on with another page.

 

Now, in paperspace I could set up a layout, create a viewport that exactly fit the innermost borderline of the template titleblock/border, activate the viewport, zoom window one of the framed areas while using the modelspace frame as a guide for the zoomed window. Then I would close the viewport, and give the viewport the scale that was noted in modelspace, and I was done.

 

This shop's template drawing already contained frames drawn for each scale commonly used, so I would only have to copy one, and draw within it, already knowing the scale, and dimension style I would need for it.

Very well explained, thanks Dana

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sengna
I usually print from Model space, but on my drawings, I put a note that says the scale when printed on a certain sized sheet.

 

The OP's note has incomplete information :?

Eldon, What does O.P's mean? What other infomation that were missing that need to be on there beside 1/4" = 1'-0" ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tzframpton

O.P. = Original Poster

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
eldon
What other information that were missing that need to be on there beside 1/4" = 1'-0" ?

 

The size of the sheet of paper on which it should be printed, like Double Elephant for example.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dana W
The size of the sheet of paper on which it should be printed, like Double Elephant for example.
Yeah, I forgot to mention a standard for that shop I worked in. We always plotted to Arch D extended 36 x 24 paper, and plotted the Layout. There were times we printed to smaller sheets for review and redlines, but they were simply plotted Window, shrink to fit, center the plot. The size of the paper rally didn't need to be in modelspace for them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jarr3tt88
I received the drawing from the vendor, in model space, it said "Scale: 1/4"=1'-0" on the bottom that drawing, What does that mean? what confused me is that when i went to verify the dims on site, the distance of the 2 frame work Legs is 72" which is exactly match with the drawing. but the drawing on CAD said 1/4"=1'-0" on model space, will i still need to scale the drawing up

1 to 1 (true size)? Why put the scale on model space? I like to draw everything in true size and if need i use scale i want in paperspace. Any suggestion is appreciated

 

What the scale means in model space is the annotative scale. Modelspace is still 1:1 and no you don't need to scale anything up. Basically what annotative is useful for if you are using a drawing in two different viewports and need two different size texts. Annotative is created 1:1 and then it is every single scale you need it to be in those viewports (as long as you set that object "to see" those scales)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sengna
What the scale means in model space is the annotative scale. Modelspace is still 1:1 and no you don't need to scale anything up. Basically what annotative is useful for if you are using a drawing in two different viewports and need two different size texts. Annotative is created 1:1 and then it is every single scale you need it to be in those viewports (as long as you set that object "to see" those scales)

why put everything in the model to start with? Don't you think use scale on paperspace viewports would be much easier? Thank you Jarr3tt88

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ReMark

Can you attach a copy of the drawing to your next post? Some of us might be interested in seeing what you were sent by the vendor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jarr3tt88
why put everything in the model to start with? Don't you think use scale on paperspace viewports would be much easier? Thank you Jarr3tt88

 

Everything is in model space because model is 1:1 you draw 5ft line, its 5ft in model. Paperspace is there to put your drawings into scale. You don't want to draw in paper space, aside drawing titles, and maybe a few general notes here and there. Model is where the model goes, paper is where the "scaled viewports" go. Paper is for your presentation.

 

What the annotative scale for in model space is so you can organize your notes in each scale. Example, the way I use annotative is for my overall floor plans in 1/8" scale, and then I add in 1/4" for when I do the unit plan blowup for details, dimensions and notes. When I'm in model I can switch back and forth between 1/8 and 1/4 to work on each I need. Whats good about annotative is that you don't need to know how much to scale an object because once you place text, block, or dimension in a scale you want, it will automatically be proportioned correctly based on the scale its supposed to be. In addition, a 1/4" scaled annotative object will not show in any other viewport unless it is 1/4" same for all other scales. AND you can have an object (say a room name) which you'll want to be in 1/4 and 1/8 which you can put both scales in that object and they will be visible in 1/8 and 1/4. Each scale of that object will move independently of each other so you can move as you need.

 

Hope this makes sense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...