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segmo85

How to sketch Turbo Actuator Flange?

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segmo85

Hello fellow CAD tutor

 

 

Here I have a small project I’m working on. I’m new to all this cad design but I find it very enjoying, my cad skills is very basic but planning on improving. I’m currently using Auto CAD 2012.

What I have problem with, is figuring out how to sketch this flange on cad so I can get it to a laser cut. Here I have uploaded some pictures and hopefully give you guys a good idea to what I would like to achieves. Pic 1 shows how the actuator fitted to flange, problem there is that the actuator rod is not pointing in the right direction, so I’m having this trouble getting full swing to actuator flap. So what I’ve done is by holding actuator with my hand it gives me a rough idea where the flange should sit, shown here in Pic 2. Now my big question is to how would I work out my angle? Position of holes? And so on. So I can create this flange on to sketch. If someone could give me some sort of advice and guidance to how I should take this approach will be much appreciate

 

 

 

 

Edited by segmo85

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ReMark

The first thing that comes to mind is the word "calipers". The second is "steel machinist's rule".

 

3D scan the object and bring it into AutoCAD as a point cloud to create a 3D model? Derive the 2D view(s) from the 3D model.

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segmo85

but i would like to create new flange, giving that the existing flange is not in right location. but not sure how this 3d scan works?

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ReMark

Yes, I'm aware you would like to create a new flange but the mounting holes for the bolts aren't going to change are they? Start with a drawing of the existing flange then modify it to create a new flange. Does that not make sense to you?

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Patrick Hughes

I think I would modify the bolt pattern to get reasonably close and use a commercial ball joint (rod end) connector on the end to accommodate slight misalignment. You would need something like that anyway since the actuator appears to be linear and the "flap" has radial travel.

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segmo85

Hey ReMark, no all mounting holes be same. ill start with existing drawing flange go from there. But i like this whole idea of 3d scanning thing any info or links? cost much to set up ?

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segmo85

Thanks, I will look into that.

 

I think I would modify the bolt pattern to get reasonably close and use a commercial ball joint (rod end) connector on the end to accommodate slight misalignment. You would need something like that anyway since the actuator appears to be linear and the "flap" has radial travel.

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ReMark

There are hand held 3D scanning devices but I don't recall any names at the moment.

 

It doesn't matter if some of the mounting holes are not the same. The point is you start with something you can measure and accurately draw then modify it to fit. Do you really want to start from scratch?

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segmo85

I would have to start from scratch, given that i don't have a 3d scan :(. What would you recommend i should do ?

 

There are hand held 3D scanning devices but I don't recall any names at the moment.

 

It doesn't matter if some of the mounting holes are not the same. The point is you start with something you can measure and accurately draw then modify it to fit. Do you really want to start from scratch?

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ReMark

I guess I assumed the bracket shown with the tape measure (3rd image in your first post) was yours.

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segmo85

Yea its mine, one of pic 1 and pic 2

I guess I assumed the bracket shown with the tape measure (3rd image in your first post) was yours.

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ReMark

OK...to me that is not starting from scratch per se. You have an existing bracket that can be measured and drawn. You copy that off to one side of your drawing and modify it to suit your needs knowing that if you screw up you still have the original. It's not like you are designing this new bracket completely off the top of your head or a sketch you made on a cocktail napkin. Understand?

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ReMark

Just one of many hand held 3D scanners.

 

http://cubify.com/en/Products/Sense

 

For your purposes I think a set of calipers, a machinist's gauge and steel rule should be fine (and cheaper).

 

Got to go now. I have some reading to do. Bye.

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segmo85

Thanks Remark, you been very helpful. see ya.

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tzframpton

My uncle has been a fabrication professional for 35+ years. His nickname was "The Jigger" for decades because of his genius ability to craft up the jigs for each station on projects... for welders or tooling or press operators, etc.

 

What I've seen him do in the past with a scenario like yours, is use something as a template first that can be easily modified or fitted and then "reverse engineered". For instance, in this case, he'd start with a block of wood, sand and chisel it down until it fit just right. Then he'd fasten it down via a clamp along a straight edge on his table so he could use another straight edge measure tool, a right angle tool and/or a cheap set of vernier calipers to sort of pick it apart in pieces and jot the measurements down, piecing it back together with the CAD operator. Or I've seen him use cardboard pieces, or even paper to "wrap" around organic shapes and cut it in such a way where it simulates a paper folding technique, as shown in this example here: http://boxtemplates.blog.com/2012/11/14/paper-bag-box-template-with-auto-bottom/. He would then have the sheet metal piece lasered out and it would bend and fold around the shape perfectly as he tack or plug welded it in place, forming perfectly, then letting the finishing guys grind and smooth all the welds to a very clean product.

 

Point is, instead of trying to find point A and point B in free floating three dimensional space, use a sacrificial piece of wood or other workable material to fit the part between point A and point B, then use your preferred method of a measuring device to dimensionally document the sacrificial part in AutoCAD.

 

Not sure if this is the route you wanted to take, but it's another suggestion either way. Welcome to the forum BTW! :)

 

-Tannar

 

*EDIT*

After re-reading your first post and paying more attention, I may have steered you in the wrong direction before. It seems you want to literally just "copy" the part? In that case...

 

Clamp the piece down against a straight edge, like a metal set square. Then get a digital vernier caliper set. If you have another straight edge, you can run along one side, inch by inch and "piece together" the part. I did a similar method on a project I started a while back here: http://www.cadtutor.net/forum/showthread.php?71752-Modeling-my-Fender-Squier-Stratocaster-fun-project-for-me

 

Also consider tracing it on a piece of paper and scanning it in on a flatbed scanner. This is one way to at least get it started.

 

Sorry for the confusing first half of the post! :)

Edited by tzframpton

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ReMark

This is a good idea: "...consider tracing it on a piece of paper and scanning it in on a flatbed scanner."

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segmo85

Hey guys need help I can not print my sketch to real scale on A4 paper? I've tried setting plot and played with scale setting(1:1 etc) no luck. By the way I'm using cadiso template here I have an attached image but dunno how to attached dwg file. can anyone show me to what I'm doing wrong ?

 

much appreciated

James.

actuatorprtsc.jpg

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ReMark

Click on the Go Advanced button > Click on Paperclip icon. Browse to your drawing. Upload it. Attach it to your post. Add a few words of text for good measure then click on Submit Reply.

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SLW210

To attach a drawing file select Go Advanced at lower right of reply box, scroll down to Manage Attachments, browse to the file, select and upload.

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