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Behemothrex

One Point Perspective

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Behemothrex

Hey guys,

 

Okay I am a bit confused, thought I had this down, but the more I look into it the more confused I get. The book I am using has about 4 paragraphs on how to do this, and it leaves out some major points, or at least I think it does.

 

I need to make a one point perspective of a room, and I have some measurements, and the elevations. I can't just use the standard perspective method as I have actual measurements to use.

 

The trouble I am having is how to set this up so I can transfer the measurements. The example in the book seems straight forward, except they don't say how to space things in the elevation view or how to find the distance between the plan view and the perspective view.

 

I tried to reproduce the plan view but I found that several measurements are missing, so there must be a different way to do it without the measurements.

 

So I will enclose the example from the book and the reference drawing I was given.

 

A starting point would be greatly appreciated.

1point.jpg

instructions.jpg

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rkent

1. The elevation is the right side view of the plan, so the spacing will be the same as that shown in the plan view.

 

2. This is arbitrary. You have the SP which established the width of objects so it doesn't matter how far down you project the horizontal lines off of the picture plane. When drawing on the board we were limited to the sheet of paper. With CAD that limitation kind of goes away, so if you want to work further away you can.

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Behemothrex

Thanks rkent,

 

What confused me about the spacing of the elevation view was in the example the book shows it goes A, B, C, but in the plan view its A, C, B which seems wrong, if you are going left to right.

 

Okay will try to reconfigure my elevations and then project to the perspective view and see how that goes.

 

 

Bah, this is going nowhere LOL. As there doesn't appear to be any easy way to find the distance between the cabinets. And how do I establish the station point in the perspective view, do you just pick a spot? Gah my brain is exploding, going to take a breather I think.

Edited by Behemothrex

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rkent

The elevation is looking front to back so the order of the objects makes sense.

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steven-g

The station point isn't a fixed, always use this point rule, it is as you say "just pick a point" but it does effect how the final perspective looks and is often based on a point using the cone of vision shown on your example, this usually means that you end up with a nicely proportioned drawing. The "picture plane" is also a pick a place decision, and will only make a difference to the size of the final drawing, so you should draw a line so that where it goes across the cone of vision the distance between where the lines cross each other is the size of your "paper".

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lrm

Your question 1 “…the spacing of things in the in the elevation view…” The spacing should be the same as the spacing of those things in the plan view.

 

Your question 2 “… the distance between the plan view and the perspective view.” Dows not matter as you are projecting (vertically) the intersection of sight lines and their intersection with the picture plane.

 

Set up both a plan and elevation view as in the sample drawing. Just having an elevation scale is not sufficient.

 

The distance from the picture plane to the front of object A in the plan view should be the same in the elevation view.

 

The location of the SP defines the degree of perspective. The closer it is to the Picture Plane the more pronounced (exaggerated) the perspective view. Move SP to infinity and you have a parallel projection. The distance from the SP to the PP should be the same in the plan and elevation views. As steven-g states, the location of the PP simply scales the perspective projection.

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