Jump to content
wonderpriya

3d move

Recommended Posts

lrm

ReMark,

 

I was away from access to AutoCAD for a few days. Thank you for providing further details on my suggestion to use ROTATE3D. The OP did not read my post carefully and was using 3DROTATE.

 

wonderprija,

 

I really think you should stop trying to create 2D isometrics and go with a real 3D model approach. The model you are trying to create is rather simple. If constructed intelligently it should not have response time or crashing problems. You should create the individual furniture items as solids and use blocks rather than groups or plain copies. In addition to more easily creating isometric drawings, a 3D model will enable, through the use of camera view, a perspective view from within the room or a bird's-eye view.

 

~Lee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ReMark

I thought the project/assignment was due to be handed in this past Friday. I am surprised the OP is still working on it. Maybe he got an extension but I can't imagine he has enough time to scrap it and go back to doing the restaurant in 3D. He's already inquiring about the next assignment and once again talking about a 2D isometric. However this time it has to be hand drawn for some reason.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ReMark

Going back to what Irm said about creating the furniture as solids and then saving as blocks. The table and four chairs seen below were created as solids and the drawing was saved. The file size is 186KB. If I open a new drawing and insert the table and chairs as a block then copy that block nine more times (for a total of ten blocks) and save the drawing the file size actually decreases to 144KB. If I were to explode each of those ten blocks (creating a mix of surfaces and regions) I end up with a total of 2510 objects in the drawing and when that drawing is saved the file size balloons to 1.36MB. And that's for a very simple table and chair arrangement.

 

Table and chairs as solids.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lrm

ReMark,

Your exercise points out the efficiency gained by using blocks. An empty AutoCAD file is about 30KB so in your example the table and chairs consumes about 150KB. I would guess that each instance of a block adds about a 100 bytes (= 0.001KB) or so. A block instance includes: the name of the block, its layer, scale. location and orientation in 3D space and not much more. Ten instances of a block may add about 1KB but this is noise compared to the amount of data needed to define the geometry of the 4 chairs and the table. Your single instance file may have had some holes in the database as a result of the construction process of adding and deleting objects. This may account for the smaller file size for the 10 tables and 40 chairs.

 

You could get even better efficiency if the table-and-chairs blocks were defined as a table with 4 instances of a chair block.

 

There's no need to explode the block unless you wanted to change one instance of the table and chairs without affecting the other instances.

 

~Lee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ReMark

All good points.

 

I mentioned exploding the block because that is precisely what I think the OP did with the blocks he downloaded. Unfortunately I have no idea why he would do that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ReMark
I'll try rotate3d. Do you know if there is any trick in doing plan and isometric drawing of a residence on paper. Because we are supposed to do residence on paper and the lines are all crooked. I like computer and am able to do it on computer and not on paper.

What criteria has to be met for the design of this residence? How many square feet? How many bedrooms and bathrooms?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
wonderpriya

It's 60 by 40 and I don't know how to do staircase in isometric view. Do you know how to do staircase in isometric view?


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ReMark
It's 60 by 40 and I don't know how to do staircase in isometric view. Do you know how to do staircase in isometric view?

 

60x40 feet is a fairly large residence. Is it multi-level?

 

That would depend on what you came up with for a design. I can't help you if I have no idea what your staircase looks like. Is it a normal staircase (straight) or circular? Does it have a landing? Is there a railing? Have you decided what you'll be using for the rise and run of your steps? How wide is the staircase?

Edited by ReMark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ReMark

Here is an example of a very simple straight run of stairs drawn in a 2D isometric. The overall length is 14'-0 3/4". The overall height is 10'-0". The rise is 8" and the run (stair tread depth) is 11 1/4". The width of the stairs is 3'-0".

 

Staircase - straight.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ReMark

And here is an example of a very simple staircase that utilizes a landing so that the stairs can turn and go in the opposite direction. This version has the same number of steps (15) as the one posted above.

 

Staircase - with landing.jpg

 

Local/national building codes will give you guidance re: max riser height, minimum tread depth, minimum width and minimum distance to any wall once one leaves the last step (important when dealing with landings). You'll also be made aware of minimum/maximum rail heights and spacing of balusters if they are to be incorporated into the stair design.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
wonderpriya

Thanks alot. Its the one with the landing which they are doing. I'll do that. Your drawing is very nice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
wonderpriya

I was not able to do drafting yesterday. I was trying to multitask it with the mobile and I feel my brain is become half. There is something callled monochronocity and polychronicity on web. I got it by looking up mutitasking. A film star said she multitasks and it isnt what it is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...