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Crow

Revit MEP 2017 - tips for hydraulic design documentation (Australia)

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Crow

Hi all.

 

Long time listener first time caller.

 

I am an inexperienced CAD drafter and have tried to make the leap into Revit from AutoCAD MEP for years.

 

I am focused on three key things:

 

Building my families, templates, in-house tools that can be used across projects

 

Becoming proficient with modelling the plumbing and piping found 'out of the box' before attempting to utilise custom add-ons and families available on-line

 

Adapting my workflow (I adhere to Australian Standards) to suit Revit MEP

 

The less familiar I am with CAD could possibly be a blessing in disguise, but I constantly fall into the trap of thinking in CAD terms rather than how Revit wants me to use it.

 

What are some useful tips for someone getting started?

 

Thank you in advance :)

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ReMark

Any chance your company would be willing to send you for some training?

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RobDraw

Agreed, any sort of training you could get would be beneficial at this point. There is a ton of information on the internet but some sort of guided approach would give you a solid foundation even if it isn't geared towards your particular field, it will get you familiar with some of the inner workings of Revit.

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tzframpton
I am focused on three key things:

 

Building my families, templates, in-house tools that can be used across projects

 

Becoming proficient with modelling the plumbing and piping found 'out of the box' before attempting to utilise custom add-ons and families available on-line

Modeling piping is generally easy from one perspective: it's a System Family, meaning it's integrated into the Revit platform and you need not use or learn the Family Editor since it's a proprietary type of tool within Revit. You just click the Pipe tool and run with it. It of course needs some set up which isn't difficult.

 

Best thing to do is practice on an existing and completed project. Recreate it verbatim, if you intend to go the self-taught route. Speak to your superiors about attributing some hours each week to this task.

 

If you could get some training it would help tremendously. You cannot learn Revit without learning the architectural side of Revit first. Things like Levels, Grids, the different Views, etc. Training would help you absorb all of these basics. Then you can move on from there.

 

-TZ

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