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herguth1

Autosave

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herguth1

I'm working in AutoCAD 2017 and inadvertently clicked the "no" to "save changes" rather than "yes". I lost a ton of work. In previous versions, to my recollection, it was a fairly simple procedure to go to the .sv$ file, rename it and recover the work minus 10 minutes or so. Anyone know the secret to that now?

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Cad64
In previous versions, to my recollection, it was a fairly simple procedure to go to the .sv$ file, rename it and recover the work minus 10 minutes or so.

 

That has never been the case. See below, from the Autocad Help files:

 

If AutoCAD crashes or is otherwise abnormally terminated during a session, you can recover data saved in .sv$ files by locating the autosave file, renaming the .sv$ extension to dwg and then opening that file in AutoCAD. The autosave file will contain all drawing information as of the last time autosave ran. When AutoCAD closes normally, .sv$ files are deleted.

 

If you didn't save when closing then all the work you did is lost.

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herguth1

You've sharpened my recollection, it was when the program crashed you could go to the autosave location, find it and rename it. Fortunately I created several detail drawings which cover the entirety of the machine so very little was lost, just relocated.

Thanks,

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Dana W

The *.bak file will bring you back to the last hard save point, but you probably already know that.

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Dadgad
The *.bak file will bring you back to the last hard save point, but you probably already know that.

 

Probably, but still well worth mentioning, better to err on the side of caution. :beer:

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ammobake

A friend of mine ran Autocad for a month without using autosave one time and he lost all the work he did. They brought me in to try and recover it but it was gone.

 

Wasnt' a co-worker but a government guy lol.

 

Temp folders can also have a saved copy of the autosave file. You can find the correct temp folder path for your computer in Autocad Options>Files>Automatic Save File Location.

 

Could be worth a look.

 

-ChriS

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Cad64
A friend of mine ran Autocad for a month without using autosave one time and he lost all the work he did. They brought me in to try and recover it but it was gone.

 

An entire month? How is that even possible unless he left Autocad open every day, never closed the drawing, and most importantly, never saved his drawing even once during the entire time he was working. That's just an accident waiting to happen. It was never a matter of "if" but "when" he would lose all his work.

 

Also, as I mentioned previously, Autosave files are only relevant if Autocad crashes. If the program is closed normally the .sv$ file files are deleted. So the OP is out of luck on that one.

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Cad64
Not quite true you can un-delete a file with the right software.

 

I'm not sure what you're talking about? The OP did not delete any files. He closed Autocad without saving, so he doesn't have any files to un-delete.

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RobDraw

I believe he is referring to the autosave files that get deleted with a successful save.

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Cad64

I suppose it's worth a try, but at best you will only recover whatever is contained in the last Autosave file. So if you have your Autosave set to save every 15 minutes and you do 14 minutes worth of work and then close the file without saving, you've still lost all that work.

 

Autosave is meant to be a safeguard to help recover work in case of a crash. It's not meant to be a replacement for manual saving. I turned my Autosave off years ago. It seemed to always be saving when I was right in the middle of doing something and disrupted my workflow. In this case, I think it's a good lesson for the OP to always save before closing a drawing. I actually created a lisp routine that I use to close my drawings. It does a few different things and then saves and closes the drawing. I have it sitting in the tool palette and when I'm ready to close the drawing I just click the icon and let it do the work for me, so I never have to worry about accidentally hitting No when asked if I want to save changes.

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RobDraw

I totally agree and hope to automate a few new standards for file closing of our drawings that are being set-up. Current ones, well, don't exist.

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Dana W

EDIT: Wait, There has been a change in this, below. I believe the free version has been reduced in the last year or two of some of it's capabilities, but I still stand by the paid version as a life saver. More than once It has recovered hard drives for me of nearly a terabyte of data each. I have a copy of 4.1 on my computer. It's the licensed version or I would share it through email.

 

A program called File Scavenger, a free download, can find deleted files and save what it can, to the original file format. On it's website there is a description of Ammobake's "friend's" ;)exact predicament. Unless a deleted file is overwritten in part or whole, the only thing missing is it's FAT and indexing keys. The hard part is following instructions, and finding a compatible adapter cable for that disk model if the instructions tell you the disk should be read as an external drive, because the boot sectors need to be skipped. There is a paid version too, but inexpensive. I am not sure the free version will do anything more than retrieve all the files it can. I know the paid version has a lot more filtering capability. File scavenger is highly recommended by me. It's the reason I still have my arse. Over the last nine years it has pulled me out of three disk crashes, and at least one accidental deletion of a whole AutoCad drawing library backup on a USB drive.

Edited by Dana W

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BIGAL

I try and push everyone here, go to lunch close the dwg, go to a meeting close the dwg, just hit save every now and then. I dont think most of them even know what I set there autosave to.

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ammobake
An entire month? How is that even possible unless he left Autocad open every day, never closed the drawing, and most importantly, never saved his drawing even once during the entire time he was working. That's just an accident waiting to happen. It was never a matter of "if" but "when" he would lose all his work.

 

Also, as I mentioned previously, Autosave files are only relevant if Autocad crashes. If the program is closed normally the .sv$ file files are deleted. So the OP is out of luck on that one.

 

SHRUG! I know... He left his computer running for a month and figured "I'll save it when I'm done". BUT - I will say that he didn't have any formal Autocad training and the guy didn't really know what he was doing.

 

He had to paid me on the side to complete some of his projects for him. That's how lost he was.

 

The Gov tried to hire me to fill his position later on.... That's a different story.

 

-ChriS

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JD Mather
... He left his computer running for a month .-ChriS

 

I'm impressed that AutoCAD would run for a month without crashing!

What are his system specs?

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Dadgad
I'm impressed that AutoCAD would run for a month without crashing!

What are his system specs?

 

Hi JD, I think there may be a typo in your post.

Guessing you were thinking SHOCKED! :beer:

Glad to see you still drop by now and again!

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