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PJ01

Change dimension sizes

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PJ01

Q1. Having done a drawing and found that my dimension text is too big, how do I go about changing all the dimensions in this drawing without having to change each one individually?

 

Q2. How do I draw a dimension extension line for the radius of a circle that is like a broken arrow - i.e it goes horizontally, then angles up or down at 45 degrees with the arrow head at the end of the angled section touching the circle? The break occurs in the middle of the arrow

 

All ideas and suggestions are most welcome

 

regards,

 

PJ

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Dana W

Q1.

 

Find out which text style your dimension style is using.

 

Click on the Annotation tab on the ribbon. Select a dimension. See which dimension style name pops up on the drop down selection box at the top of the Dimensions tile.

 

Open the dimension style manager by clicking the tiny arrow at the lower right of the dimensions tile, or command DIMSTYLE, click Modify next to your style name and look at the text style in the selection box.

 

Then close it without changing anything for now.

 

In the TEXT STYLE EDITOR, the text height for text used in dimension styles should be set to 0.0 (zero) so the dimension style can override it.

 

Don't change the text style height to 0.0 if this text style is also used for things other than dimensions and leaders, for instance multi-line text styles. If you do change it, all the text objects using that text style will also change.

 

You should have a text style saved that is ONLY used in dimension and leader styles, set to text height of 0.0 and then modify your dimension and leader styles to use that new text style.

 

Now that you have all that straight, go to the dimension style manager, and modify the dimension style you are using, to adjust the text height, and also adjust the sizes of pretty much everything else about your dimensions.

 

NOW, to avoid having to design and build a couple dozen or more dimension styles, one for each different viewport scale you will EVER use, forget everything I wrote above and make a concerted effort to learn how to use annotative dimensions, which requires only ONE dimension style that automatically adjusts itself to the viewport scale, and to the modelspace view scale which is only useful with annotative dimensions and notation, OR simply place your one and only dimension style in paperspace instead of modelspace.

 

Q2. Beats me. Not sure the dimension style editor allows leader type radius and/or diameter lines. You can play around with the style editor and see what it lets you have.

 

Wait, this may help. Do you know you can select the text or the lines for your radius dim, and adjust them by click & drag more or less to any position you like? When you manipulate the text of a radius in this manner, you can pull it out until the text orients horizontally, and it gets a little horizontal leader landing next to it. Maybe this is what you need to do.

Edited by Dana W

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PJ01

Thanks for taking the time and effort to do this, Dana, I really appreciate it, and have followed your steps, and have been able to change the dimensin text stye via the Dimension Style Manager .

 

As a newbie, I was unaware of the significance of "Annotative" dimensions

 

simply place your one and only dimension style in paperspace instead of modelspace.
can you please tell me how to do this?

regards,

 

PJ

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Dana W
Thanks for taking the time and effort to do this, Dana, I really appreciate it, and have followed your steps, and have been able to change the dimensin text stye via the Dimension Style Manager .

 

As a newbie, I was unaware of the significance of "Annotative" dimensions

 

can you please tell me how to do this?

regards,

 

PJ

You are very welcomed.

 

Um, annotative dimensions are a pretty steep learning curve. I'll leave that for later. Let's do paperspace dimensions first.

 

Now, you will see that I may tell you many things you already know, but I don't know what you know, so...

 

As far as paperspace dimensions, it's pretty simple.

 

First things first, you have to use paperspace viewports, you are aren't you?

 

When you have your viewport all set up in paperspace, you will need a dimension style set up with all it's pieces parts sized just as you want them to appear on paper. For instance, text height; To plot it at 1/8" (3.2mm) then set it to that height in the dim style editor. The same goes for the length of arrowheads, offset from origin, so on and so forth.

 

If you already have a dimension style set up for 1:1 scale then that one is perfect for using in paperspace, because the scale in paperspace is always 1:1 except for inside the viewport.

 

Lock the viewport once you have your objects lined up the way you want them. Did I mention to LOCK the viewport? :D with the viewport locked (button on the paperspace task bar when the viewport is either selected or active.)

 

Once you have that all ready to go, the rest is simple.

 

If you have not already, do this >> Command > OPTIONS >> User Preferences tab. Make sure Make New Dimensions Associative is checked.

 

By the way, Associative, and Annotative are two completely different things.

 

I suppose you already know what associative dimensions are. They will change to follow the modifications made to your objects. At least they are supposed to, it's not always foolproof.

 

Move to paperspace, click on the Annotate ribbon tab, make sure object snaps are on, and simply place your dimensions as you would in modelspace. Do not activate the viewport while placing dimensions in paperspace. Otherwise the dims will be inserted in modelspace and be WAY out of scale unless your viewport is scaled to 1:1 or 1'-0" = 1'-0".

 

In your object snap selection list, uncheck Node so dimensions won't become associated to each other rather than the objects in modelspace.

 

The dimensions will live in paperspace at 1:1 scale yet show the measurements of the objects in modelspace. NOTE: If you miss clicking a dimension onto an object snap, the measurement may show the paperspace distance instead of the object measurement distance. The same thing may happen if you use non-associative dimensions.

 

That's pretty much it.

 

The one disadvantage to dimensioning in paperspace is this. If you have to move or modify your modelspace objects after dimensioning them, you have to go to the paperspace layout tab(s) where that object is in the viewport, and check to see if the dimensions followed the changes. If you have moved an object far enough to require panning and zooming the viewport to find it again, the paperspace dimensions may or may not land back on it the way they are supposed to. It depends on how good the dimension associativity is.

Edited by Dana W

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Dana W

Annotative dimensions.

 

A few basic and very important things are different from regular dimensions.

 

1. There is no point in placing annotative dimensions in paperspace. although it can be done. It is just a waste of effort to set up annotative things and then only use them in paperspace where it is always 1:1 scale.

 

1. View(port) scales are assigned and attached to your annotative objects. This is done automatically. we will get to how in another post. Then, they will automatically change size to match the current view(port) scale. Pretty much any object that is a defined entity can be made annotative; dimensions, leaders, multi-line text, blocks, and some less frequently used items. One does NOT make modelspace objects drawn there annotative, only the objects classed as annotation like dims and leaders, and the occasional block.

 

2. Create a text style that is ONLY to be used in annotative dimensions, Mtext, and leaders/multi leaders. In the text style manager set the text height there to whatever size you want it to PLOT at. Do not leave it at 0.0 height. Be sure to check the Annotative box in the text style editor before saving the style. Name it AnnoText or something.

 

3. Create a new dimension style constructed as if it is designed for use at 1:1 scale. You can use your dim style you already created for use at 1:1 scale as a starting point. When you open the dim style editor select that style and then click the New button. Change the style name now unless you want it named CopyOfSumthing.;) Use your new annotative text style in this new dimension style. The text height in your dim style editor will be grayed out since you already set it in the text style editor. Don't forget to check the Annotative box before saving your new dim style.

 

 

Well, that is pretty much all of the front end set up you have to do in order to use Annotative Dimensions.

 

Setting up is not where people have issues with Annotative Objects. It is in the usage of them where you can find confusion, despair, and dismay.:lol:

 

We'll hit usage in another post. I need a beer.

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PJ01

And I need lots of time to learn and absorb :) Many thanks again, Dana

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