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L-P

CAD - plan and side view

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L-P

I'm just trying to learn a little bit about CAD myself, therefore this is a fairly basic question.

 

If drawing up a plan view (bottom of the attached image) with a corresponding side view directly, precisely how would you go about putting in the vertical lines connecting the two so that these are in precisely the correct place.

 

Do you simply draw the horizontal line at the top (longer than required), then switch on the required OSNAPS?

 

Which OSNAPS would you have switched on?

 

Thanks for any help.

drawing19.jpg

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ReMark

Why would you draw the horizontal line longer than the width of the object?

 

As for the OSnaps at the minimum I'd enable endpoint, intersection and center.

 

Way back when...we were taught to draw the top, front then side views in that order. Any basic technical drawing/drafting book will have a chapter devoted entirely to orthographic projection.

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rkent

See my answers in bold below.

 

I'm just trying to learn a little bit about CAD myself, therefore this is a fairly basic question.

 

If drawing up a plan view (bottom of the attached image) with a corresponding side view directly, precisely how would you go about putting in the vertical lines connecting the two so that these are in precisely the correct place.

 

Do you simply draw the horizontal line at the top (longer than required), then switch on the required OSNAPS?

 

There are multiple ways to get there, none really more correct than the other although some will probably argue. So yes, for now, draw the horizontal line above, draw lines to that, start trimming, etc to edit it to what you need.

 

A way to do this so you don't have lines to trim later is to use Object Tracking, you can hover over a point then move the cursor up and pick a point on the line above, for example. Look at help or online for videos showing this technique.

 

Which OSNAPS would you have switched on?

I would use, ENDP, QUA, CEN, PERP, INT

 

Thanks for any help.

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dan113

Object snap tracking is the way forward. I wouldn't get into the habit of drawing lines and tidying up later when there is no need.

 

Most of the 'cad' people I work with turn every snap on and that's their setup. There is a place for each snap point but that's what temp overrides are for.

 

When we set someone new on that needs training they get sent to me and I set them all up the same. I show them how to change the settings they normally end up with how I set them up. I played with osmode for years and finally settled on osmode 239.

 

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk

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Dana W

I simply make a copy of the top view, rotate it -90 deg (angle measurement set to relative) and place it above where I want to draw my side view. It's a modified version of Orthographic projection which eliminates the 45 deg diagonal line, and at the same time shows the purpose for the line. Then I project lines down from the top view and over from the front view. Traditional Ortho projection is fine, and necessary for paper drafting but when you have a computer where Erase doesn't dig holes in your paper, take advantage.

 

Besides, using traditional ortho projection on a complicated object, like an office break room jammed full of cabinets, is extremely 'projection line' intense, and it's easy to lose your place.

 

Another thing; one does not have to leave ALL the projection lines in place nor do you have to lay them ALL in at one time. That's another adaptation to the computer.

 

Back in paper days, I'd draw in the projection lines with .3mm 4H lead, and just leave them on the paper. Then lay in the objects with 0.7mm 2H or 0.5mm 3H. The projection lines gave the drawing a nice Techy look all faded in the background when run through the diazo machine. I could burn them off of the prints with the speed knob if I needed to.

Edited by Dana W

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Dana W

Here's the simplest example of orthographic projection I have. It's a 6" long piece of 2x4. The orange and light gray lines are temporary. The orange line MUST be at 45 deg.

2x4.jpg

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nukecad
how would you go about putting in the vertical lines connecting the two so that these are in precisely the correct place.

 

Check the Autocad XLINE command.

https://knowledge.autodesk.com/support/autocad/learn-explore/caas/CloudHelp/cloudhelp/2016/ENU/AutoCAD-Core/files/GUID-40650DCE-E8CA-483C-8E25-7FA9AB6992C1-htm.html

http://autocadtip.com/xline-command-in-autocad.html

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