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therock005

Scale Entire Drawing

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therock005

I'm a Land Surveyor and when i draw topographic plans i always use the same scale. I Draw 1:1 since surveyed objects like buildings, boundaries are measured in their true coordinates and only objects like texts, tables, legends, blocks etc need to be scaled accordingly.

 

This time around i messed up since the drawing is too big for the scale most oftenly used (1/200) and ends up needing more than A0 size paper to plot. So the logical thing to do is scale it down to 1/500. I didnt use annotation scales or anything, so how can i easily perform this 1/200 -> 1/500 so all objects texts-dimensions, and everything scales accordingly without any  snafus

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dlanorh

If you need to scale up the texts, tables, legends, blocks etc to be readable at 1:500 the scale factor would be 2.5. Check the Autocad Customisation Forum and see if there is lisp that could help (provided you're not using an LT version).  

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therock005

Is this it?

 

https://www.cadtutor.net/forum/topic/38409-looking-for-a-lisp-which-scale-objects-with-its-own-center-point/

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dlanorh
2 hours ago, therock005 said:

 

How adept are you with lisp? There is a good guide Here

 

I have attached a copy of Lee's code from the above link, which I have adapted to provide a prompt for the ssget. Test it first to see if  it does what you want. It will ignore anything on a locked layer.

ScaleAboutCentre.lsp

Edited by dlanorh
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eldon

If you are a land surveyor, then in no circumstances should you scale your drawing, particularly NOT with the "ScaleAboutCentre" lisp. Your coordinate system will be lost, and for surveyors, that is a capital crime.

 

Although your drawing is too large to be on an A0 at 1 to 200, how much is it too large? In the past, I have managed to put a drawing onto an A0 at 1 to 250 scale, and that entails no scaling.

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dlanorh
19 minutes ago, eldon said:

If you are a land surveyor, then in no circumstances should you scale your drawing, particularly NOT with the "ScaleAboutCentre" lisp. Your coordinate system will be lost, and for surveyors, that is a capital crime.

 

Although your drawing is too large to be on an A0 at 1 to 200, how much is it too large? In the past, I have managed to put a drawing onto an A0 at 1 to 250 scale, and that entails no scaling.

 

I think he just wants to scale up the texts, tables, legends and blocks so they are readable at 1:500

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therock005

Of course i only want to scale annotation and supplementary objects. Otherwise a select all and scale times 2.5 would easily do the trick. Thing is how to select every appropriate entity at once, all with as less steps possible without leaving something out resulting with an odd drawing. Anyway i know how to handle lisp, not how to program though, so will test this code out when i get the chance. Thanx for your input

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eldon

One problem that I find when doing a similar exercise is that there is too much information, at a scale of 1 to 500, to be crammed onto the drawing. Some spot level texts may have to be moved, some text may have to be deleted or moved. In other words, there is no quick and easy solution. It helps to have your layers adroitly managed.

 

Good luck!

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BIGAL

Do some home work about annotative text this is what your after as no matter what scale your deg is plotted at your text will always be a fixed height.

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