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AutoCAD Electrical 2010


MFish
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Has anyone seen or had the opportunity to use the new 2010 Electrical? I have been trying to find some in depth articles about it and have really not had much success.

 

I was just curious if they have changed anything from 2009, or if they decided to just update it with a few new features...

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I am in process of trying to get my IT department to install it. But like you, I have found no info on it either. If you find any, let me know where to look please.

Thanks!

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  • 1 month later...
  • 1 month later...

I have it installed and currently only using to test it out to see if we should push it forward to everyone else. This means I still have to use the 2007 dwg files (there is a new 2010) format for dwgs.

 

So what do I think about it? I find it works fairly similar to 2009, except they now have an "AutoCAD: Electrical Classic" profile. This means if you do not like ribbons you may not like 2010. I am finding the ribbons a lot more useful, then even the tool palette, so I love it.

 

Another feature I love is the DWG to PDF.pc3 file works for TrueType fonts. This is probably the number reason I am pushing to go to 2010 since we currently have to print to an Adobe network printer.

 

The do have a conduit scheduler and really improved the circuit builder, unfortunately I have not had time to fool around with these features. Although, if looks like the circuit builder is a lot more user friendly, although still requires an Excel spreadsheet to build.

 

Finally, it looks like 2010, through the circuit builder, has made single lines a lot more easier to build intellgenantly.

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  • 6 months later...

We have it installed, but not using it in anger yet. TBH, I dont think it can be used straight from the box, least not for our companies use. I've been converting all our companies standard symbols, and borders, (to become intelligent) but, its taking time. Plus we have the vault server setup running sweetly now and all our libraries are on there too. When I make new symbols and images for the 'Insert Symbol' icon menus, the other guys get to use it/them instantly. We've had it for just over a year, and have a fair way to go yet. Haven't even looked at the 'panel' side of it yet.

 

Then there's the databases :D , we felt there was just too much junk in them, most of which we'd never use in a million years. So we set a couple of guys to create *csv files in the correct format, to be imported. This way other bods could update them before they went into our DB..

 

We had a dabble with the 3D side of it, for panel dwgs and found the file sizes were astronomical (28Mb for a single file, and that was a simple one) so we shelved it until we can find time to investigate options.

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GettinBetter,

 

There is indeed a lot of overhead that needs to go into AutoCAD: Electrical, out of the box. I am sure any company will tell you that, especially since you have to build blocks for every angle that you might need to use them.

 

However, I would suggest you not overwriting the AutoCAD: Electrical databases. For a few reasons:

 

1. It never hurts to have too much information, in case you end up needing it at some point in the future, especially as you learn AutoCAD: Electrical better. I was the same way and even if we did not go to your levels there are still things I wish I would have done the Autodesk recommended way.

 

2. If you change how the databases work too much, then if you ever run into a problem it will be nearly impossible for anyone from the outside to assist you, either from Autodesk or on forums like this one.

 

3. Why reinvent the wheel? You spent the money on AutoCAD: Electrical, if you wanted to re-do the databases, then you should have just brought AutoCAD. There is nothing AutoCAD: Electrical does that you cannot do with .NET, LISP, and other features avaible in basic AutoCAD; but who has the time. Not to mention AutoCAD: Electrical standardizes it from one company to another.

 

 

Basically, I think it is a waste of time to re-do all the databases into *.csv files; but that is my opinion. If you need help understand what the data does, then feel free to post your questions here. I am sure you will find out later on all that data is useful in one way or another.

 

But, whatever you choose have fun learning it. It is a great program once you dive into it and be sure to learn LISP since a lot of the customizing of reports can only be done with that language.

 

I am sure you will be an expert in no time. :)

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1. It never hurts to have too much information, in case you end up needing it at some point in the future, especially as you learn AutoCAD: Electrical better. I was the same way and even if we did not go to your levels there are still things I wish I would have done the Autodesk recommended way.

 

When I said we'd never use those parts in a million years I wasn't joking or being flippant, we seriously won't, because many of those components are simply just out of our scope of works. Mind you I've got backups of the lot.

 

2. If you change how the databases work too much, then if you ever run into a problem it will be nearly impossible for anyone from the outside to assist you, either from Autodesk or on forums like this one.

 

Yes, that is a downside. But as all the data is on one server, the time taken to refresh the Icon Menus, is just too long, and therefore doesn't justify keeping the un-necessary data.

 

3. Why reinvent the wheel? You spent the money on AutoCAD: Electrical, if you wanted to re-do the databases, then you should have just brought AutoCAD. There is nothing AutoCAD: Electrical does that you cannot do with .NET, LISP, and other features avaible in basic AutoCAD; but who has the time. Not to mention AutoCAD: Electrical standardizes it from one company to another.

 

Ah, well thats it I don't have too much time, well not to learn lisp as well (although I have started) I constantly have upper management on my back asking when it will be "up and running". They just have no idea of whats involved. What's more they don't really want to either, which is fine by me, I'll just have to grin and bear their comments, and reply as professionally as humanly possible :D. Then of course there's the office and workshop who wouldn't like to learn the intricacies, of all the new (to them anyway) symbols. What they would eventually do, rather than admit their ignorance, is say that it wasn't working and attempt to revert back to the old system.

 

Basically, I think it is a waste of time to re-do all the databases into *.csv files; but that is my opinion. If you need help understand what the data does, then feel free to post your questions here. I am sure you will find out later on all that data is useful in one way or another.

 

There is a method to my madness. The problem is that the people who will eventually be updating the info for the DB's/csv's will not have a clue about ACADE or how important the precise positioning of each element is. So they can play about till their hearts content an never muck up my DBs, plus I get a chance to vet the *.csv files before I import them. Thanks for the response though, its always nice to get some elses take on a situation, and if my reply has fuelled any other comments please feel free.....

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GettinBetter, I have to say I understand your pain, especially with management and your fellow co-workers. We were "encouraged" by the customer to go to AutoCAD: Electrical, so really no one wants to move out of their comfort zone. :)

 

Also, I about making the data simpler to update you have a good point there are times I wonder what would happen if I get "hit by a truck"; but one thing that might help you out a little is all the databases can be edited from AutoCAD menues. It takes a lot of the confusing out of it; but not all perhaps I should think about streamlining the process for that "truck" moment mentioned above.

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