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Goomba
6th May 2010, 01:42 am
I got this email a while ago, Maybe not AutoCAD museum, well I guess it had to start somewhere! All before my time but I'm sure some of you might find it relevant!

You know you are an old Draughtsman when............................
You know how to control line weights by rolling your pencil.
You know that a French curve isn't a grade change on a language exam.
You've erased sepias with chemicals.
You've had a roll of toilet paper on your drafting board.
You remember when templates were plastic and not a type of electronic
file.
You know what sandpaper on a stick is for.
You know that compasses draw circles and are not used to find the
North Pole.
You remember the head rush from the smell of ammonia.
You own a roll of masking tape so dried out, it will never be tape
again.
You've done cut and paste with scissors and sticky back.
You've etched your initials into your tools.
You have had a brush tied to your drafting board.
You've come home with black sleeves.
You've made hooks out of paper clips to attach to your lamp.
You know an eraser shield isn't a Norton program.
You've used "fixative" spray.
You've had a middle-finger callous harder than bone.
You have a permanent spine curvature from bending over your table.
You could also smoke in the office
You could put the 'page 3' calendar up in a prime location with no one
complaining
There were a lot of 'cowboys' about but now it's all Indians
The Evening News printed the words "Piping Designers wanted" on a
Wednesday
Agents didn't sound like spotty kids
You'd change jobs for an extra 50c
You'd have a set of blunt razor blades but not for shaving
You'd have the 'taste' of an old white rubber on your tongue
You'd be able to speak to the engineers in English
There'd be more than one way to sneak back into the office after lunch
You'd actually do a time sheet on a Friday
You learnt to fold an A0 drawing to get the title on the front
You'd have to be nice to the print room staff
You had to find new ways of persuading the stationary bloke to give
you a pencil
The old Doris in the office looked like she was 'chewing a wasp'
There were NO old draughtsmen
You also were accurate from 100 paces with an elastic band.
Your personal phone calls were in front of the chief draughtsman.
You went to the pub most lunchtimes.
Friday afternoons were spent colouring in.
There was an office junior.
Everybody hated the same person.
The chief draughtsman wore overalls with ink stains on the pocket.
And your timesheet bore no relevance to the hours you had worked!! (Well....something's don't change!!!)

ReMark
6th May 2010, 10:55 am
And you also know if you are an old draftsman if...

You have an Exacto knife and a supply of #11 blades as part of your tools.
You have 1st degree burns on your hand from the electric eraser.
You know the difference between a ruler and a scale.
You have a pile of eraser crumbs on each side of your drafting table.
You know how to use a T square.
You've actually used ships' curves and flexibles curves.
You know what a beam compass is.
You know the difference between vellum and mylar.
You know what a wash-off mylar is.
You used a pin-bar registration system to create overlays.

Biscuits
6th May 2010, 12:25 pm
One more:

The Scum Bag is not the guy next to you.

Tiger
6th May 2010, 12:32 pm
You learnt to fold an A0 drawing to get the title on the front



Hey I know that! :)

Wait... :unsure:.. does that make me old? :cry:

ReMark
6th May 2010, 12:42 pm
How many plastic triangles do you still have sitting in drawers collecting dust?

Tiger
6th May 2010, 12:43 pm
How many plastic triangles do you still have sitting in drawers collecting dust?

uh...I might have a semi-circle one, does that count? oh, but now that I think about it, I have three or four laying at home...damn, I AM old :cry:

Dana W
6th May 2010, 01:29 pm
If there was a female 'Secretary' working in your office, and you used to chase her about the room with the eraser sticking halfway out of the electric bit so it would wiggle while it whirled.

If you have permanent scars on the underside of your forearms from worn straight edge cable strands.

If you have a dent in your forehead from the parallel arm lamp hitting it whenever you increased the tilt of your drafting board.

If you have ever used a window for a light table.

If you've ever made a potato cannon from cardboard paper shipping tubes.

If you still open 1 gallon juice containers with your eyes closed and your head turned 180 degrees to the rear.

If you can turn your head 180 degrees to the rear.

If you know what Diazo means.

If you have recurring nightmares about being naked at work with only a necktie on and it's caught in the diazo machine.

If you have ever been involved in a tape ball fight.

If you still own an adjustable triangle.

If you know what kind of lettering 'Leroy' is.

Dana W
6th May 2010, 01:32 pm
How many plastic triangles do you still have sitting in drawers collecting dust?

Mine collect sawdust. I use them to do tablesaw setups in my woodshop.

ReMark
6th May 2010, 02:33 pm
You know what a Koh-i-noor pen is used for.

You recognize the words "Letraset" and "Chartpak".

You have a horsehair brush but you don't own a horse.

You have a steel straightedge and a self-healing cutting board.

You would recognize a K&E "rolstop" if you saw one and know how to use it.

You have a triangular sleeve around your #2 penicl so it doesn't roll off your drafting board when it is tilted.

You even know what a drafting board is.

You have a "french curve" in the shape of a woman.

Your set of ruling pens still get used.

ReMark
6th May 2010, 02:41 pm
You used a "stomp" and not seen it on Broadway.

You have a K&E lead spline whale on your desk but only use it as a paperweight.

You know what a pounce bag is.

Ryder76
7th May 2010, 05:26 pm
Oh Good Lord I know ALL of these - I must be flippin' ancient!:shock::lol:

sinnerboy
21st Aug 2010, 07:47 am
Cast your mind back 25 years BC ( Before CAD )

Words had different meanings then

X-REF - A RETIRED UMPIRE
BOUND X-REF – RETIRED UMPIRE, CAUGHT IN COMPROMISING POSITION
ATTACHED X REF - A MARRIED RETIRED UMPIRE
PAPER SPACE – A DESK ON WHICH TO FOLD DRAWINGS
MODEL SPACE – A DESK ON WHICH TOWORK ON AIRFIX
FILLET – A LARGE STEAK
SERVER –WAITER WHO BRINGS YOUR FILLET
PAN - AN INSTRUMENT FOR FRYING FILLET
EXPLODE - CONSEQUENCE OF EATING TOO MUCH FILLET
ARRAY - SOMETHING BOUGHTWITH CHIPS
CUT & PASTE –WALLPAPER’S JOB
SNAP – TO LOSE THE HEAD
OBJECT SNAP – TO BREAK SOMETHING
WIZARDS - FAIRYTALE FIGURES
ZOOMWINDOW – PANE OF GLASS ON A FERRARI
HATCH PATTERNS – THE WAYS IN WHICH BIRDS ARE BORN
ICONS –WERE HOLY PICTURES
VIEWPORT – VISTA FROM END OF DUNLAOGHAIRE PIER
LINEWEIGHT – HOW HEAVY YOUR WASHING IS.
PLOT SCALE - SIZE OF YOUR GRAVE
PLOT STYLE MANAGER – HEAD GARDENER IN GRAVEYARD
POLAR TRACKING – EXPLORERS PASTIME
RIGHT CLICK - TO BE MUTUALLY ATTRACTED TO SOMEBODY
POLYLINE – DATING MORE THAN ONE PERSON
TOOLBAR – PUB FULL OF IDIOTS
TRIM –WAS A TOWN IN MEATH (IRELAND)
UNDO AND SNAP –WHAT HAPPENED AS YOU TRIED TO TAKE YOUR GIRLFRIENDS BRA OFF
VP SCALE- AN EXECUTIVE’S SALARY LEVEL
POLYLINE – TWO DATING PARROTS
POLYGON – ACRIMONIOUS SPLIT UP OF PARROTS

Dana W
21st Aug 2010, 07:47 pm
Draughtsman? :? Ohhhhhhhhhhh, Draftsman! Now I get it. :lol::lol:

marmo
2nd Oct 2010, 07:47 pm
The clock is ticking ...
I once worked with an old architect (about 80 years). He knew how to "use" (turn on) computers and Microsoft Word.
The only problem was that he used Recycle Bin to store project reports!

The Buzzard
3rd Oct 2010, 01:25 am
You know your an old draftsman when this poem is on the wall of your office.

This poem goes back to the days of drafting tables and pencils and was very common to many then.

The Last Revision Authored by: Ken Lipka
The Draftsman and the Engineer
are men of skill and vision.
At least they are until they hear
the hated word -- REVISION.

The Engineer with practiced eye
surveys his grand design.
The Draftsman draws so expertly
each complicated line.

"Complete," they sigh contentedly,
"Miraculous Precision."
Oh, Optimists! Tomorrow brings
catastrophe! REVISION!

Revision One adds this piece;
Revision Two improves it.
Revision Three makes it just right;
then Revision Four removes it.

"You can't do this, you can't do that."
"We'll wait for a decision."
"But in the meantime, just revise
that last revised Revision."

Revise! Revise! The very word
fills Engineers with dread.
Tho' die they must, they'll be revised
to make damn sure they're dead.

They hope that God's no Engineer
when he makes his decision.
If once they win their wings they hope
there'll be no Last Revision

Jack_O'neill
14th Oct 2010, 08:17 pm
This is priceless!!!

Dana W
15th Oct 2010, 07:52 pm
You know your an old draftsman when this poem is on the wall of your office.

This poem goes back to the days of drafting tables and pencils and was very common to many then.

The Last Revision Authored by: Ken Lipka
The Draftsman and the Engineer
are men of skill and vision....

They hope that God's no Engineer
when he makes his decision.
If once they win their wings they hope
there'll be no Last Revision

Hey, Lipka was looking through my windows.:lol:

Usually, during revision 8 of 10, a hole would be worn in the paper. Have any of you gone to the trouble of taping in a patch to a vellum drawing? Cut and Paste was NOT invented by Microsoft.:D

CyberAngel
20th Oct 2010, 02:59 pm
Cast your mind back 25 years BC ( Before CAD )
Words had different meanings then

With apologies, I have a few more.
Color Table: where some children sit in art class
Wipeout: unsuccessful surfing
Profile: face seen from side
OLE: heard at bullfights
Base Point: to a climber, the foot of a mountain
Model Space: photographer's studio
Paper Space: newsstand
Clipping Plane: typically precedes Crashing Plane
CAD: not a gentleman
Alias: assumed name
Action Recorder: private investigator
Block (UK): apartment building
Block (US): collection of cells
Anonymous Block (either): full of John Does
Fence: found around blocks
Layer: segment of cake
Layout: done after eating cake

eyde
20th Oct 2010, 10:43 pm
Hey, Lipka was looking through my windows.:lol:

Usually, during revision 8 of 10, a hole would be worn in the paper. Have any of you gone to the trouble of taping in a patch to a vellum drawing? Cut and Paste was NOT invented by Microsoft.:D

My first drafting job 35 years ago was for the Housing Athority and I did cut and paste for as-builts that is all I did all day long every day.

Dana W
21st Oct 2010, 02:30 pm
My first drafting job 35 years ago was for the Housing Athority and I did cut and paste for as-builts that is all I did all day long every day.
O lordy. :shock: I have a stress headache just thinking about it. In '79, I did electrical schematics for a 'Big Space Agency' Subcontractor pretty much the same way. My teeth are still grinding.

Geoffers
21st Oct 2010, 09:09 pm
This thread is wonderfully nostalgic.

White drawing overalls... OMG 30 years ago +...I wore a white lab coat type overall at work. After a few days off ill, but first into work, I climbed a little deleriously to the 3rd floor garret and my dimly lit office - to see 'myself' in white lab coat already hunched over the drawing board. After double-take I pushed at 'myself' who slowly fell over into pieces; cardboard drawing tube and paper body parts only loosely held together with drafting tape inside my lab coat. Oh how we laughed when colleagues turned up some minutes later!:lol:

Jack_O'neill
22nd Oct 2010, 04:07 am
Geoffers,

Your comments remind me of a little ditty I saw on the bulletin board many years ago...

Attention all employees...it has come to our attention that employees dying on the job are failing to fall down. This practice must stop as it has become impossible to distinguish between death and the normal movement of the staff. Henceforth, any employee found dead in an upright position will be dropped from the payroll. Thanks and have a nice day!!

Someone actually posted this on company letterhead. HR was of course furious, but no one ever owned up to it.

Susan-Skye
28th Oct 2010, 10:53 pm
This is awesome! And perhaps, not quite as 'ancient' as some of you people claim- or is it that I'm just old-fashioned? :oops:

I'm only 28, but I know about 80% of what you all are talking about! My grandfather was a chemical engineer at Union Carbide in Texas, and when I majored in drafting in High School we started out with pencil, paper, eraser shields and drafting boards with self-healing mats- and I used ALL of my grandfather's old equipment! We still have his antique adjustable drafting table, and I STILL use his plastic templates and his special pencil with its combo stand/sharpener!

And you know, given the choice between pencil and vellum and the latest and greatest software... I believe I actually prefer the "old-fashioned" way...

Susan-Skye
28th Oct 2010, 11:02 pm
And yes, I remember tape-balls.... once, at the end of drafting class I walked back to the other side of the room from the CAD area, only to find that all of my things had been well and thoroughly TAPED to the drafting table at which I'd been sitting- huge gobs and wads of it, sticking all over the place! LOL! I've never looked at masking tape quite the same way! :P

Bill Tillman
13th Feb 2011, 01:02 pm
And does anyone remember Dry Cleaners...a bag full of eraser material which was like sprinkling sand all over your drawing to keep the triangles, your arms and hands from smearing the graphite. And I heard the part about smoking was allowed. There always seemed to be some guy in the engineering room who had to smoke a pipe and the room was filled with vanilla smelling tobacco.

Eurodude
26th Apr 2011, 09:39 am
Yep The days when windows was made of glass with wood around the edges - there was no such thing as political rectitude (think Calendars) and the only bloke with a carbon footprint was Santa Clause


I got this email a while ago, Maybe not AutoCAD museum, well I guess it had to start somewhere! All before my time but I'm sure some of you might find it relevant!

You know you are an old Draughtsman when............................
You know how to control line weights by rolling your pencil.
You know that a French curve isn't a grade change on a language exam.
You've erased sepias with chemicals.
You've had a roll of toilet paper on your drafting board.
You remember when templates were plastic and not a type of electronic
file.
You know what sandpaper on a stick is for.
You know that compasses draw circles and are not used to find the
North Pole.
You remember the head rush from the smell of ammonia.
You own a roll of masking tape so dried out, it will never be tape
again.
You've done cut and paste with scissors and sticky back.
You've etched your initials into your tools.
You have had a brush tied to your drafting board.
You've come home with black sleeves.
You've made hooks out of paper clips to attach to your lamp.
You know an eraser shield isn't a Norton program.
You've used "fixative" spray.
You've had a middle-finger callous harder than bone.
You have a permanent spine curvature from bending over your table.
You could also smoke in the office
You could put the 'page 3' calendar up in a prime location with no one
complaining
There were a lot of 'cowboys' about but now it's all Indians
The Evening News printed the words "Piping Designers wanted" on a
Wednesday
Agents didn't sound like spotty kids
You'd change jobs for an extra 50c
You'd have a set of blunt razor blades but not for shaving
You'd have the 'taste' of an old white rubber on your tongue
You'd be able to speak to the engineers in English
There'd be more than one way to sneak back into the office after lunch
You'd actually do a time sheet on a Friday
You learnt to fold an A0 drawing to get the title on the front
You'd have to be nice to the print room staff
You had to find new ways of persuading the stationary bloke to give
you a pencil
The old Doris in the office looked like she was 'chewing a wasp'
There were NO old draughtsmen
You also were accurate from 100 paces with an elastic band.
Your personal phone calls were in front of the chief draughtsman.
You went to the pub most lunchtimes.
Friday afternoons were spent colouring in.
There was an office junior.
Everybody hated the same person.
The chief draughtsman wore overalls with ink stains on the pocket.
And your timesheet bore no relevance to the hours you had worked!! (Well....something's don't change!!!)

Eurodude
26th Apr 2011, 09:48 am
Now that I think of it them were'days when draffies did their laughing charts and lying charts (timesheets and Xs) after the pub on a Friday and they tittered rather than twittered.

eyde
26th Apr 2011, 02:31 pm
OH I know this well. I have another twist, I was the only female out of about 10 at my first job. In fact the only other female was the girl who answered the phone.

Teeds
26th Apr 2011, 06:37 pm
I've got halfheimers ...

Did anyone mention ruling pens, crow quill pens and linen? I started drafting in 1964 and have not quit since. The medium has changed, as has the method of input, but the goal is the same ... communication.

As the quote in my sig says ...

SLW210
26th Apr 2011, 06:54 pm
I have no recollection of any of this.

BlackBox
26th Apr 2011, 07:11 pm
I have no recollection of any of this.

Me either :lol: ... of course at my first Civil Engineering job I used AutoCAD LT 2004, and setup on-site Trimble GPS base stations, control points, heavy equipment rigs (i.e., bulldozers, graders, excavators, etc.) and modeled our sites in 3D to be saved to tiny, little data cards for the aforementioned GPS site equipment, LoL

Tyke
26th Apr 2011, 07:20 pm
I have no recollection of any of this.

WHAT :shock: and here was me thinking how modern it all was :oops:. We used rods, poles and perches when we did our chain surveys and updated rolled up mine plans that were started in 1812.

Dana W
26th Apr 2011, 08:23 pm
WHAT :shock: and here was me thinking how modern it all was :oops:. We used rods, poles and perches when we did our chain surveys and updated rolled up mine plans that were started in 1812.

Rods? Poles? Perches? how was the fishin'? Chains? We used a long length of Mammoth tendon with rocks every five rarghs's :lol:

BlackBox
26th Apr 2011, 08:32 pm
Rods? Poles? Perches? how was the fishin'? Chains? We used a long length of Mammoth tendon with rocks every five rarghs's :lol:

lmfao :lol:

foxbyrd31
3rd May 2011, 07:33 pm
here here! I am only 29 and know about 80% of the "old fashioned" stuff! I am not very quick with a pencil and a scale, but I definitely find beauty in a well crafted hand drawing. I was also glad to see when looking over the work put forth from students of my alma mater that freshmen and sophmores still draft by hand. There is certainly something to be learned by doing something the "hard" way! Sigh after all the nostalgia I have to add "brush up on my hand drafting" to my 'to do' list!

Stryker1989
25th Aug 2011, 11:21 am
Well considering I'm only 22 this makes me feel old, guess back in South Africa they were old school about technical Drawing

Tyke
25th Aug 2011, 12:55 pm
@Stryker: Old school in SA? You should have seen them on Allensway in Thornaby ;)

CyberAngel
29th Sep 2011, 04:17 pm
... you seriously considered entering the field because of an ad in a comic book.

30299

resullins
29th Sep 2011, 04:22 pm
Hey, it's getting to the point where if you ever even drafted on an actual drafting table you're old. I was a GREAT hand drafter... I almost miss it until that carpal tunnel in my left wrist flares up.

SLW210
29th Sep 2011, 05:21 pm
Did anyone ever get that "High Pay Job in Drafting"?

resullins
29th Sep 2011, 05:38 pm
Did anyone ever get that "High Pay Job in Drafting"?

I'm still working on that. I'm pretty sure you have to sell your soul, though... and I seem to have misplaced mine.

Jack_O'neill
29th Sep 2011, 05:56 pm
I like the bit where it says "you need no drawing skill...no technical ability". Now we know where all these people come from that we get on here and gripe about!!

Squirltech
29th Sep 2011, 05:59 pm
I like the bit where it says "you need no drawing skill...no technical ability". Now we know where all these people come from that we get on here and gripe about!!

I resemble that remark... :P

SLW210
29th Sep 2011, 06:28 pm
I resemble that remark... :P

Judging by your avatar and ReMark's avatar, I would say you do not resemble that ReMark.

On closer inspection...maybe........

Dana W
29th Sep 2011, 08:11 pm
Did anyone ever get that "High Pay Job in Drafting"?

Well, right after I got drafted after high school (in which I took a drafting class) in 1967, I hadda walk up two flights of stairs to see the paymaster in basic training. Does that count?
Prolly not, the only tool the army taught me to use that made anything close to a straight line was a rifle. I could make curved lines at 1000 m with the tracers from a ma deuce (M2 Browning 50 cal machine gun).

ReMark
29th Sep 2011, 11:19 pm
Remember any of these?

Drafting tables as large as a sheet of plywood.

2" high Leroy lettering templates with a scribe that had to be 6-8" long.

Koh-i-noor pens.

Blueline pencils.

.3mm, .5mm, .7mm and .9mm Pentel mechanical pencils.

Pencil sharpener on your drafting board.

Thin sheets of sandpaper on a wood handle for sharpening lead points.

Lead shot bean bags for holding down drawings.

Dana W
30th Sep 2011, 12:26 pm
Remember any of these?

Drafting tables as large as a sheet of plywood.

I worked on a drafting table that was a full sheet of plywood, in a construction trailer, building residential homes in Waldorf MD back in the 70's. It had a sheet of linoleum glued to the surface:shock: and the lower right corner was riddled with cigarette burns.

ReMark
30th Sep 2011, 12:34 pm
We covered our drafting boards with a piece of vinyl that had a different color on both sides. Green on one side and a buff color on the other. Would attach it to the drafting table using double-sided tape.

Dipali
30th Sep 2011, 12:45 pm
I sometimes miss those hand drafting days...........

Dana W
30th Sep 2011, 12:50 pm
We covered our drafting boards with a piece of vinyl that had a different color on both sides. Green on one side and a buff color on the other. Would attach it to the drafting table using double-sided tape.

Me too. Self healing board covers, they were called. I suppose you could consider them self healed because you could barely see all the razor knife cuts in the surface from the old fashioned cut/paste methods, and the cuts didn't catch on the pencil lead. At least they were invisible until they filled up with graphite dust.

ReMark
30th Sep 2011, 12:57 pm
I have a set of drawings for my house (built 1 9 0 8 that was done by hand in ink on linen. Looks like a piece of art.

BigDog
5th Oct 2011, 07:26 pm
My senior year of high school started when AutoCAD R12 was released. I walked into my last drafting class the first day of school and the teacher handed my the R12 book and told me to see how far I could get buy the end of the year. The good old days.

DANIEL
5th Oct 2011, 07:32 pm
I've done burnt stick on wooly mammoth hide, no, wait .... thats just what type of drawings I get from vendors sometimes .......

f700es
5th Oct 2011, 08:00 pm
I have a set of drawings for my house (built 1908) that was done by hand in ink on linen. Looks like a piece of art.

Those rock! I was digging through the old plans we have here and dug up the original chapel drawing from 1951. Artwork in it's highest form IMHO.
Here's a snippet..

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/2124177/snip.jpg

Manila Wolf
22nd Oct 2011, 02:41 am
NTS Was often "Not to scale", but more commonly "Not Too Sure"

Bill Tillman
3rd Nov 2011, 12:27 pm
... you seriously considered entering the field because of an ad in a comic book.

30299

CyberAngel, I can't believe you found this somewhere. Believe it or not this is the very ad that I saw and what got me interested in becoming a draftsman. I can't remember which magazine I was reading but this was the ad and I remember it well. It would have been sometime in the early 1970's I think for me it would have been around 1972 or 1973. We all complain about the pay, but I remember getting out of college with my AA degree in Drafting Technology and immediately commanding the astronomical pay rate of $6 per hour. This was in 1978 when most of my friends were lucky to get $4 per hour. Then not long afterwards I was making the then unheard of sum of $10 per hour. Shessh, I didn't know what to do with all the cash so I blew it all on wine, women and song....These days it's not as easy to command the big bucks and jobs are few and far between.

cadvision
23rd Nov 2011, 01:31 am
when you're called a "draftsman" "draughtsman" and not a cad operator. Trained on a drawing board and proud of it

amarcon
23rd Nov 2011, 05:48 am
You know you are an old Draughtsman when............................


- when asked what you do for a crust? you'd reply.... 'scratching for a living'.
- you know a parallel motion machine is not an exerciser.
- a lettering guide is not a pamphlet.
- you knew every rotring pen thickness by colour.

This is priceless....
I was a senior detailer by the time AutoCAD v1.14 became available in Australia in 1983/4?...... gosh I *AM* and old draughtsman. We were annoyed because the first CAD drawing I did took a full 40hr week to complete, when it used to take 4hrs on the board :(
After 12 months I had the same drawing down to around 1/2 hr :P

resullins
23rd Nov 2011, 03:05 pm
when you're called a "draftsman" "draughtsman" and not a cad operator. Trained on a drawing board and proud of it

Hey... I might be the youngest regular contributor here, and even I learned on a board, by hand. I still have carpal tunnel in my left wrist from it! It's all about having educators that appreciate the classics.

Organic
23rd Nov 2011, 09:31 pm
when you're called a "draftsman" "draughtsman" and not a cad operator. Trained on a drawing board and proud of it

Politically incorrect, you are forgetting the women... :P

cadkiwi
15th Feb 2012, 03:32 am
I got this email a while ago, Maybe not AutoCAD museum, well I guess it had to start somewhere! All before my time but I'm sure some of you might find it relevant!

You know you are an old Draughtsman when............................
You know how to control line weights by rolling your pencil.
You know that a French curve isn't a grade change on a language exam.
You've erased sepias with chemicals.
You've had a roll of toilet paper on your drafting board.
You remember when templates were plastic and not a type of electronic
file.
You know what sandpaper on a stick is for.
You know that compasses draw circles and are not used to find the
North Pole.
You remember the head rush from the smell of ammonia.
You own a roll of masking tape so dried out, it will never be tape
again.
You've done cut and paste with scissors and sticky back.
You've etched your initials into your tools.
You have had a brush tied to your drafting board.
You've come home with black sleeves.
You've made hooks out of paper clips to attach to your lamp.
You know an eraser shield isn't a Norton program.
You've used "fixative" spray.
You've had a middle-finger callous harder than bone.
You have a permanent spine curvature from bending over your table.
You could also smoke in the office
You could put the 'page 3' calendar up in a prime location with no one
complaining
There were a lot of 'cowboys' about but now it's all Indians
The Evening News printed the words "Piping Designers wanted" on a
Wednesday
Agents didn't sound like spotty kids
You'd change jobs for an extra 50c
You'd have a set of blunt razor blades but not for shaving
You'd have the 'taste' of an old white rubber on your tongue
You'd be able to speak to the engineers in English
There'd be more than one way to sneak back into the office after lunch
You'd actually do a time sheet on a Friday
You learnt to fold an A0 drawing to get the title on the front
You'd have to be nice to the print room staff
You had to find new ways of persuading the stationary bloke to give
you a pencil
The old Doris in the office looked like she was 'chewing a wasp'
There were NO old draughtsmen
You also were accurate from 100 paces with an elastic band.
Your personal phone calls were in front of the chief draughtsman.
You went to the pub most lunchtimes.
Friday afternoons were spent colouring in.
There was an office junior.
Everybody hated the same person.
The chief draughtsman wore overalls with ink stains on the pocket.
And your timesheet bore no relevance to the hours you had worked!! (Well....something's don't change!!!)


omg does that bring back sweet memories........arrrrhhhhh :star:

cadkiwi
15th Feb 2012, 04:02 am
OH I know this well. I have another twist, I was the only female out of about 10 at my first job. In fact the only other female was the girl who answered the phone.

I can relate.........I am female ....I started drafting in 1973...i knew of no other females in the industry at that time..it was great :D

ReMark
27th Aug 2012, 01:50 pm
Anyone recall paper or mylar sepias?

Do you know what a "burnisher" is?

cadkiwi
27th Aug 2012, 09:18 pm
Oh yes indeedy! :)

Wasn't a burnisher an electric eraser????

Do you remember having to develop your prints one or two at a time in an ammonia cabinet...where you poured ammonia into a tray at the bottom and put your rolled up print or linen above? Nearly knocked me out a few times!

Squirltech
27th Aug 2012, 09:30 pm
Wasn't a burnisher an electric eraser????

I saw one of those in a museum once! :P

cadkiwi
27th Aug 2012, 09:38 pm
Hey!!!

You missed out on a real treat......obviously batch plotting was not in our vocabulary!

ReMark
27th Aug 2012, 10:27 pm
No, a burnisher was used to smooth out the air bubbles when Letraset lettering was used.

What color was the eraser that was used to remove ink from a mylar? Hint: I'm not talking the soft white one either.

cadkiwi
27th Aug 2012, 10:45 pm
oh yes thats right....its been awhile..the memory fades.

Grey!

ReMark
27th Aug 2012, 10:55 pm
Sorry....no.

It was a light blue vinyl (waxy feel to it actually) eraser.

rkent
27th Aug 2012, 10:55 pm
No, a burnisher was used to smooth out the air bubbles when Letraset lettering was used.

What color was the eraser that was used to remove ink from a mylar? Hint: I'm not talking the soft white one either.

The burnishers I used had a 3/4" flat plastic blade on one end and a small ball bearing on the other end that was spring loaded.

The ink erasers I used were a fluorescent yellow, imbibed they called them, IIRC.

ReMark
27th Aug 2012, 10:58 pm
Yes, I remember the yellow too. They were really waxy!

The burnisher is just as you describe rkent.

cadkiwi
27th Aug 2012, 11:02 pm
oops sorry i didnt read the question properly...i was still thinking 'electric eraser'....those ones were grey...yes i remember the plastic erasers! And the 'plastic' clutch pencil leads.

BIGAL
28th Aug 2012, 03:35 am
Yeah ammonia First day as an Engineer here son we need 10 sets of the A1 tender documents all folded, the old yellow paper and got a sun tan on my hands.

Any body one to have a guess at the sheet folding machine ?

cadkiwi
28th Aug 2012, 03:52 am
i think you are thinking of a more 'modern' method. Was that the yellow paper through the blue light machine and the liquid developer rollers at the top ...where you mixed up an 'ammonia' developer powder.
I was talking about before that where there was no such developing method ...the machine had no such attachment. We had a metal cabinet on the wall and had to put straight ammonia of the 'real' sense into a tray at the bottom of the cabinet and then throw a rolled up backwards (yellow side out) print in the cabinet above, slam the door and quickly run out of the room before the fumes got yuh. We poured the ammonia straight from a bottle of ammonia and one day I sniffed it because I thought it just had water in it and blew out my sinuses!
Also we used chloroform for erasing (wiping) ink from sepias..do you remember that?
Talk about health and safety....so easy these days!

ReMark
28th Aug 2012, 11:05 am
Chloroform? Jeez! Did you pass out while using it?

I did have experience on diazo machines, working with one gallon jugs of ammonia, but our office wasn't big enough to justify the cost of a folding machine. Really big jobs were sent out to a reprographics firm.

cadkiwi
28th Aug 2012, 09:02 pm
I felt woosy I can tell you...I must say it was a short-lived method...who'd have thought it...lol

I never came across a folding machine? I was the folding machine!!!

Dana W
29th Aug 2012, 01:05 am
I felt woosy I can tell you...I must say it was a short-lived method...who'd have thought it...lol

I never came across a folding machine? I was the folding machine!!! Yeah, me too. In fact at my last job I had to show the boss how to fold ARCH "D" size plots so the title block showed and they opened from there to flat without having to flip 'em over. His first time at putting a county submission package together, roughly my 1000th one. He is a cabinet maker but he was acting as his own G. C. on an addition to his house.

cadkiwi
29th Aug 2012, 01:13 am
Folding was an art...just like manual drafting!

BIGAL
29th Aug 2012, 03:33 am
Ok The folding machine !!

It was a rectang of tin plate with little notches cut out, you laid it on the sheeets and this gave you the fold points, fold, crease, remove, adjust fold again etc.

Yeah 120 sheets later all done using the folding machine Oh and me.

ReMark
29th Aug 2012, 10:51 am
The "art of folding". Yep, I took that class too! LoL

How about trimming prints with a pair of scissors that had 8" long blades (very sharp ones too)?

Anyone still have a steel straightedge hanging around, the kind with a bevel edge on one side?

rkent
29th Aug 2012, 03:22 pm
Anyone still have a steel straightedge hanging around, the kind with a bevel edge on one side?

When I first started in this business I saw a drafter ripping drawings on a straight edge and thought what a crude way to do that job. Fast forward a few months and I too was ripping the edges with the best of them. I still use my trusty S.S. 42" straight edge almost every day.

One place bought a fancy cutting machine and it gathered dust and was tossed out soon enough.

Dana W
29th Aug 2012, 04:32 pm
When I first started in this business I saw a drafter ripping drawings on a straight edge and thought what a crude way to do that job. Fast forward a few months and I too was ripping the edges with the best of them. I still use my trusty S.S. 42" straight edge almost every day.

One place bought a fancy cutting machine and it gathered dust and was tossed out soon enough.

One place I worked had a piece of a fine tooth metal cutting bandsaw blade, dulled and broken from use, screwed to the vertical edge of a table, offset by a couple of washers. On the side of the table legs was a paper roll holder. We'd feed the paper up between the sawblade and the edge of the table until it hit a 24", 36", or 42" line on the table top, then rip it off like a piece of wax paper out of the box.

I still use this trick now to cut/tear a couple of different sizes of sandpaper down for woodworking

ReMark
29th Aug 2012, 05:01 pm
A no. 11 blade in an Exacto knife and let 'er rip! Watch the fingers though!

cadkiwi
30th Aug 2012, 04:25 am
oh yes the old blade trick! Now that was an art too.....as the paper rolled into the print machine a quick slash of the knife to trim the sheet from the roll as the drawing and yellow paper chugged into the blue light!

Remember 'butter paper' ??

CyberAngel
13th Sep 2012, 01:38 pm
When I first started in this business I saw a drafter ripping drawings on a straight edge and thought what a crude way to do that job. Fast forward a few months and I too was ripping the edges with the best of them.

Bah, why use special equipment when you can tear the paper on the edge of the table?

Tyke
17th Sep 2012, 09:19 pm
Remember any of these?

Drafting tables as large as a sheet of plywood.

2" high Leroy lettering templates with a scribe that had to be 6-8" long.

Koh-i-noor pens.

Blueline pencils.

.3mm, .5mm, .7mm and .9mm Pentel mechanical pencils.

Pencil sharpener on your drafting board.

Thin sheets of sandpaper on a wood handle for sharpening lead points.

Lead shot bean bags for holding down drawings.

I was in Oxford, England last week and saw this in the window of the official student store opposite Trinity College:

37266

If such a prestigious place of learning still requires students to use all of these items then perhaps I'm not as old as I feel. I can remember all of them, anybody else?

ReMark
17th Sep 2012, 10:44 pm
Remember them? Heck, I think I have every one of those items in my filing cabinet at the moment including the rolling ruler! Funny!

Tyke
17th Sep 2012, 11:04 pm
I've just found a flexicurve that I'd forgotten about.

ReMark
17th Sep 2012, 11:09 pm
I still have a roll of rice paper that I would use for quick overlays. That and a couple of black markers and I could design all day. Better than the cover of a book of matches or a napkin.

bennyboy86
19th Sep 2012, 12:57 am
damn flexicurve broke so damn easy.......T-square's made good rubber band sling shots........

SLW210
19th Sep 2012, 03:01 pm
Here is my first drafting set.....

37304

Dana W
20th Sep 2012, 12:53 am
damn flexicurve broke so damn easy.......T-square's made good rubber band sling shots........
Paper roll cores, and those telescoping lid heavy mailing tubes made VERY good pneumatic cannons. I made one once that could launch an empty coke can nearly fifty yards.

I have a flexicurve so old it won't hold a shape.

Dana W
20th Sep 2012, 12:55 am
Here is my first drafting set..... And your last, I bet.;)

Bill Tillman
23rd Sep 2012, 11:33 am
We also used mechanical pencils which actually called lead holders. And we soon discovered they were great for using as a roach clip. You know for holding ... uhh roaches.

SLW210
24th Sep 2012, 12:47 pm
We also used mechanical pencils which actually called lead holders. And we soon discovered they were great for using as a roach clip. You know for holding ... uhh roaches.

I just step on roaches and throw them in the trash. Why hold them? :?

ReMark
24th Sep 2012, 12:56 pm
I just throw them in the chili for the protein.

miscille
24th Oct 2012, 08:03 pm
I have a few to add,

You know what it feels like to run ammonia prints for 12 hours and see wild animals beside you lol

and you also know that paper cuts with iodine really suck and that damp blueprints NEVER line up, even if the big boss is watching

and you know just what part of your finger won't go thru an oversize stapler

and you know what collate means

I agree with the liquid lunch theory too

miscille
24th Oct 2012, 08:12 pm
Funny guy

I still wake up shaking yelling Mark, Mark, Mark when it get cold out lol (rod holder from way back lol)

cadkiwi
24th Oct 2012, 08:36 pm
We also used mechanical pencils which actually called lead holders. And we soon discovered they were great for using as a roach clip. You know for holding ... uhh roaches.

I got it Bill...it seems no one else did

Jimmy111
1st Nov 2012, 04:27 pm
Yes, I remember this. When I read the post I could smell the prints....... :(

resullins
1st Nov 2012, 04:32 pm
I got it Bill...it seems no one else did

I got it... I just didn't get an alert to this message. Actually, I still have and use my lead holder! I love it!

The sad part, I'm probably the youngest person to remember this stuff... but I went to a college that felt the need to teach us the old fashioned way BEFORE teaching us anything else. And I loved it!

ReMark
1st Nov 2012, 04:55 pm
Ruling pens could also double as roach clips as well.

Anyone here, besides me, still have a carousel? And I'm not talking about the one that you see at an amusement park.

Re: surveying. I have a K&E (Keuffel & Esser) field book (loose leaf no less) with a plastic, red/white, rectangular "target" taped to the front cover. Inside is a plastic sheet with distances from side stakes for cross-sectioning on one side and trigonometric formulae and reduction to horizontal diagrams/explanations on the other.

Dana W
1st Nov 2012, 05:38 pm
Funny guy

I still wake up shaking yelling Mark, Mark, Mark when it get cold out lol (rod holder from way back lol)

Have you ever had a surveyor throw a walkie talkie at you?

ReMark
1st Nov 2012, 05:47 pm
Have you ever had a surveyor throw a walkie talkie at you?

No, but I had a transitman throw a sight pole (also known as a range pole) at me once (just for fun). That red/white javelin arcing through the air sure got my attention!

tomhamlet
1st Nov 2012, 06:46 pm
I got it... I just didn't get an alert to this message. Actually, I still have and use my lead holder! I love it!

The sad part, I'm probably the youngest person to remember this stuff... but I went to a college that felt the need to teach us the old fashioned way BEFORE teaching us anything else. And I loved it!
I agree, I am a young drafter at 21, but not only did I learn "board drafting" but used all the tools in it. The only tool that I did not use in college that I did get to use in highschool was a blueprint machine. I am now convinced that is where the term "smell of success" was coined lol

Dana W
1st Nov 2012, 06:59 pm
No, but I had a transitman throw a sight pole (also known as a range pole) at me once (just for fun). That red/white javelin arcing through the air sure got my attention!

Wow. Just for fun?

The guy on the tripod threw his walkie talkie at me because he thought I wasn't responding to the signals. We were near Andrews AFB and their transmitter tower completely destroyed any signal he might have been sending. After a brief discussion about why we learned hand signals and where walkie talkies might be inserted, and how uncomfortable he would be driving back to the office with it inserted in same, we got back down to business.

Dana W
1st Nov 2012, 07:03 pm
Ruling pens could also double as roach clips as well.The short nibs on the end of a bar compass (just the bar).

ReMark
1st Nov 2012, 07:15 pm
Dana:

Take a stroll over to the Chat forum. I started a new thread re: surveying.

CyberAngel
14th Mar 2013, 09:53 pm
You know when you're an old draftsman when...

you think, "What I really need for this is drafting tape," and you find out nobody sells it any more.

neophoible
14th Mar 2013, 11:03 pm
That's funny. I'd pretty much forgotten about that. I used drafting dots a lot. Maybe painter's tape would work?

rkent
14th Mar 2013, 11:11 pm
You know when you're an old draftsman when...

you think, "What I really need for this is drafting tape," and you find out nobody sells it any more.

They are still available.
http://www.amazon.com/Pacific-Arc-Drafting-Dots-box/dp/B004EKQCN6

neophoible
14th Mar 2013, 11:30 pm
Yeah, how about that! Not just the Dots, but the Tape as well!

http://www.amazon.com/Pro-4-Inch-60-Yards-Drafting-Tape/dp/B0041LOOVA/ref=sr_1_1?s=arts-crafts&ie=UTF8&qid=1363300089&sr=1-1&keywords=drafting+tape

Of course, it's also called artist's tape.

SLW210
15th Mar 2013, 12:43 pm
I wish they would use drafting tape on the paper rolls for the plotters, here lately the tape on those rolls has refused to come off cleanly.

welldriller
17th Mar 2013, 05:37 am
If I may --- you know you are old when you can remember:

That when nothing else worked to fix a problem you used the little red switch (on/off toggle switch) and yes it was red

When 64 mb of ram was tops

When you could make a directory on your hard disk and load a file in it and Microsoft did not mess with it.

Wen you had control of what was put on your computer (not Microsoft)

As for the drafting tape check www.dickblick.com - www.nationwidedrafting.com for a start.

Dana W
17th Mar 2013, 01:21 pm
I wish they would use drafting tape on the paper rolls for the plotters, here lately the tape on those rolls has refused to come off cleanly.

That's one of my pet peeves now too. Also can't seem to get a box of Wheaties open without tearing off the "recloseable" tabs on the top, or simply splitting the whole box open.

Dana W
17th Mar 2013, 01:23 pm
If I may --- you know you are old when you can remember:

That when nothing else worked to fix a problem you used the little red switch (on/off toggle switch) and yes it was red

When 64 mb of ram was tops

When you could make a directory on your hard disk and load a file in it and Microsoft did not mess with it.

Wen you had control of what was put on your computer (not Microsoft)

As for the drafting tape check www.dickblick.com - www.nationwidedrafting.com for a start.

64 mb? are you kidding? My first workstation PC had 512 kb. An IBM PC A/T.

Dana W
17th Mar 2013, 01:24 pm
If you know what bum wad is.

welldriller
17th Mar 2013, 11:12 pm
If I remember right it was an Apple or the Apple II But then again my memory could be worse then I thought. :?

Organic
18th Mar 2013, 12:00 am
If I remember right it was an Apple or the Apple II But then again my memory could be worse then I thought. :?

I remember this also.

CyberAngel
18th Mar 2013, 08:38 pm
If I may --- you know you are old when you can remember: ... When 64 mb of ram was tops ...

I think you mean 64 kilobytes....

And when I say I can't find drafting tape, I mean on the shelf at an office supply store or a craft shop. The nearest real art shop or printer's is about 20 miles away.

welldriller
19th Mar 2013, 03:47 am
Hi CyberAngel Now that you mention it I think you are correct about the 64 kilobytes. Short on tiome right now but will be back later tonight (I think).

FOR INFORMATION ONLY: Walmart -> Koh-i-Noor adhesive DRAFTING DOTS with 7/8" diameter white 500 to a box
You order them on line -- have them shipped to your local stoor free of freight charges
OFFICE DEPOT -> Steedtler artist tape 3/4" X 360" white Item #609696 $3.59

SEARS ROEBUCK & CO. -> To many types and brands of drafting tape to list here.

NOTE: If The local store does not have the items on the shelf -- most stores now days will have it shipped to their store
and no freight charges, but you need to check with them to be sure.

Got to go for now :D

CAD'n'Briar
30th Sep 2013, 09:02 pm
...And I heard the part about smoking was allowed. There always seemed to be some guy in the engineering room who had to smoke a pipe and the room was filled with vanilla smelling tobacco....

Dear Bill Tillman:

Dave "CAD'n'Briar" here, with my first post...and the "briar" part of my handle DOES refer to my 39+ years of ongoing pipe enjoyment (with a very "rarely occasional" Dominican cigar, of seriously generous dimensions, from time to time here at home), something that goes great with a serious ACAD or DesignCAD (http://www.imsidesign.com/Products/DesignCAD/tabid/321/Default.aspx) session ("DC" is an affordably priced CAD environment, that I've been around as long as I've used ACAD!) on my home PC to keep my skills up after five YEARS of unemployment, and even well before then. To expand my skill set, though, I'm even teaching myself the basics of SolidWorks 2000 (since mid-2011) when time permits these days on my home PC when not practicing with ACAD or DC, as I've got that, too.

When I learned drafting (as a career change away from "strictly electronic manufacturing" work) at a small institute in Cambridge, MA in 1990-91, pipe enjoyment was still OK in the entry area of that small school (not in the classroom, of course), and enjoying my briars in the entry area was quite OK at that time, even in a "barely-indoor" situation. I first had to start enjoying my briars out in my car in the mid-to-late 1980s while at work before the workday started, and during break-times and lunch, and I've been completely fine with doing that ever since...but being WITHOUT work from the recession since September 2008 has NOT been a fun time.

Regarding doing manual drafting, the skills I learned in doing THAT just over two decades ago were critically important in getting my first (and so far only) drafting job in August/September 1997. I worked for eleven years doing manual and AutoCAD with the firm that's now known as UC/Synergetic, at their former office location in Norwood, MA. Their line of work, as a "consulting" firm, was partly wrapped up in working on client firms' telephone network drawings for telcom providers like Verizon, which was my "bread'n'butter" while I was there.

During the first three years there — before I started doing my work in AutoCAD 13 & 14, from July 2000 through to the end of the week that Lehman Brothers collapsed in September 2008 — once in a great while I DID run into ancient, coated linen "plats", as the telephone network drawings (both manual and CAD) were all called. Many of the so-called linen "plats" were so "ancient", that they dated from just about a century back in time, when Verizon was called "New England Telephone" in the Ma Bell days. The very same varnished tool box I had made up with thin birch plywood, to hold all of the manual drafting tools I had used in that small tech institute in Cambridge, MA got brought in every day for my work at the time - and is still very much in sight of me whenever I get up out of my computer workdesk's chair here at home.

Before I realized it, by the start of 1998 everyone was marveling at my apparently "innate" ability to draw EVERY single letter of text on any manual drafting document from Verizon that I worked on, completely WITHOUT any form of lettering guide whatsoever. And not long after people began to notice the fact I was not using any "lettering guide" of any sort, that single fact about my manual drafting skills earned me :oops: the nickname "the human plotter"...no kidding.

In fact, I still have that degree of skill, as any handwritten job application I've filled out at a potential employer's office seems to still earn similar appreciative comments on a continuing basis...so I'd have to guess it IS a natural for me to do printed text that decently.

Perhaps it's those nearly four decades of "ongoing-ly" quiet indulgence from my pipe enjoyment at home that's kept me somewhat sane during that ongoing job search, since the recession's outbreak half a decade ago — I'll never doubt that as being likely, and I'm always mindful that to enjoy a bowlful in a briar properly, I can't bother anyone with it, either — something that's made enjoying a briarful a much easier thing to do.

There was quite a sizable number of other situations "from the manual drafting past" that I recognized in this thread's earlier posts, too, as I was never very far from the engineering areas in any electronic manufacturing situation I worked in. I clearly remember one pipe-fan draftsman in the late 1970s, at one of my earliest electronics workplaces, who held his briar together with drafting tape after the shank-to-stem joint on his oldest briar got too loose to stay snug by itself. There was also an engineer in the same firm (that "went under" at the end of the 1970s, just over a year after I left it) whose handsome-looking, well-dimensioned straight-stem briar, always had way too much "perique" blend (the most potent varietal tobacco around, from Louisiana) in the mixture, that actually had the same "Pemberton" name for the blend as his family name. That mixture in his briar was SO strong, it nearly knocked everyone over whenever he lit it up in the late 1970s, described by some at that long-ago firm as smelling somewhat like a peat-soaked inner tube.

I stay away from such strong mixtures myself, though...perique blends are simply too strong for yours truly, but I DO remember a lot of those experiences I had with other drafters and engineers, and the manual drafting that I could still do if ever called upon to do so....

...but CAD is SOOO much easier 8) to work with !!!

Yours Sincerely,

CAD'n'Briar...;)..!!

PotGuy
2nd Oct 2013, 05:03 pm
I got this email a while ago, Maybe not AutoCAD museum, well I guess it had to start somewhere! All before my time but I'm sure some of you might find it relevant!

You know you are an old Draughtsman when............................
You know how to control line weights by rolling your pencil. Yup
You know that a French curve isn't a grade change on a language exam. Yup
You've erased sepias with chemicals. Nup
You've had a roll of toilet paper on your drafting board. Nup
You remember when templates were plastic and not a type of electronic
file. Nup
You know what sandpaper on a stick is for. Yup
You know that compasses draw circles and are not used to find the
North Pole. Yup
You remember the head rush from the smell of ammonia. Nup
You own a roll of masking tape so dried out, it will never be tape
again. Nup
You've done cut and paste with scissors and sticky back. Nup
You've etched your initials into your tools. Yup
You have had a brush tied to your drafting board. Nup
You've come home with black sleeves. Nup
You've made hooks out of paper clips to attach to your lamp. Yup
You know an eraser shield isn't a Norton program. Yup
You've used "fixative" spray. Nup
You've had a middle-finger callous harder than bone. Nup
You have a permanent spine curvature from bending over your table. Nup
You could also smoke in the office Nup
You could put the 'page 3' calendar up in a prime location with no one
complaining Yup
There were a lot of 'cowboys' about but now it's all Indians Nup
The Evening News printed the words "Piping Designers wanted" on a
Wednesday Nup
Agents didn't sound like spotty kids Yup
You'd change jobs for an extra 50c Nup
You'd have a set of blunt razor blades but not for shaving Nup
You'd have the 'taste' of an old white rubber on your tongue Nup
You'd be able to speak to the engineers in English Yup
There'd be more than one way to sneak back into the office after lunch Yup
You'd actually do a time sheet on a Friday Yup
You learnt to fold an A0 drawing to get the title on the front Yup
You'd have to be nice to the print room staff Yup
You had to find new ways of persuading the stationary bloke to give
you a pencil Yup
The old Doris in the office looked like she was 'chewing a wasp' Yup
There were NO old draughtsmen Yup
You also were accurate from 100 paces with an elastic band. Yup
Your personal phone calls were in front of the chief draughtsman. Yup
You went to the pub most lunchtimes. Yup
Friday afternoons were spent colouring in. Yup
There was an office junior. Yup
Everybody hated the same person. Yup
The chief draughtsman wore overalls with ink stains on the pocket. Nup
And your timesheet bore no relevance to the hours you had worked!! (Well....something's don't change!!!) Yup


Wow. I'm 18 and I can say yes to more than a few. :(

Eurodude
12th Oct 2013, 10:22 am
LOL I've been on the buttons so long I forgot how to do joined up writing and can no longer write neat capitals either.

Last time I saw 55 was on someone's front door and if I took a post in a UK design office now I would probably still be the tea-boy.

Nice post (for those of us who started when windows were made of glass with wood around the edges and the only guy with a carbon footprint was Santa-Claus.)

ayethzerothree
13th Dec 2013, 05:02 am
and also...
you dont write a letter without the guidelines. . ..

Dinochrome
26th Feb 2014, 11:37 pm
I have an oak drafting table and a K&E drafting machine at home.

ROBP
27th Feb 2014, 11:24 pm
You also know your an old draftmen if you still purchase white out liquid by the gallon and use a larger brush to hide things.
If you still have lines not meeting in corners and have alot of red circles when corrections comes back.
If you looking to replace the transperent edges on the T bar because of the wiggly lines on the plans because you used it for cutting with the x-acto knife.

If you still have layouts with sepia colored tint all around the edges in your study.

If you remember the koh-inor ink bottle with the pump action cap.

If you still send copies on the faxed machine that was copied over and over again and rounded shapes are now oval ones.

If you cant find replacement parts for your xerox copier.

Oldtimer
28th Mar 2014, 03:34 pm
Hi guys, I'm a newbie here but couldn't pass up the chance to post on here. I didn't read all the posts but one thing I have not seen is:
"You know you're an old draughtsman if you know how to use a Leroy lettering set."
I've been in the civil field since 1975 when I started with a surveyor right out of high school. I learned CAD in 1986 on Acad v2.6 and then we got DCA with version 2.9 and a Calcomp 8 pen plotter. Ah, the good old days...

f700es
28th Mar 2014, 03:38 pm
if you know how to use a Leroy lettering set

Ewww, Leroy fonts. Good one.
Welcome to CADTutor BTW :)

ReMark
28th Mar 2014, 03:41 pm
I still have my own personal Leroy Lettering Set I purchased as a draftsman for C.E. Maguire. The case is a little dusty now but it still has every lettering guide and the scribe along with a spare ink holder.

Welcome to CADTutor "Oldtimer".

tzframpton
28th Mar 2014, 03:43 pm
Ewww, Leroy fonts. Haha, I had to Google that one....

If anyone's interested: http://www.ebay.com/bhp/leroy-lettering

ReMark
28th Mar 2014, 04:00 pm
I have the "vintage" set in the green plastic case. Really wish I had the one in the wood case.

Oh and I have the pen holder too!

Reminds me I have a beam compass with an attachment that could accept a technical pen along with the original lead holder and ruling pen nib for ink. I bet you're all jealous!

Oldtimer
28th Mar 2014, 04:20 pm
Thanks guys, good to be here. Looks like a fine forum. The reason I signed up was because the forum here provided me with an answer to a minor issue I was having. Hopefully I can contribute in some small way as well :thumbsup:
ReMark - I remember using one of those beam compasses with the technical pen attachment back in the early 1980's. Boy, I had forgotten about that until you mentioned it.
BTW - what was everybody's first hand-held calculator? Mine was a Texas Instruments SR-51 I got from my dad when his business machine business folded. He left me a note asking if I wanted one for $3! They were about $150 or more at the time. That one came in handy on my job as a draftsman working for a surveyor.

ReMark
28th Mar 2014, 04:32 pm
I'm sure my first hand held calculator was from TI as well (since it was such a well known company) but I do not recall the model number. However, I still have two slide rules in working condition even though neither one has a case!

Dana W
28th Mar 2014, 04:56 pm
My first hand held calculator was a "Bowmar Brain" (http://www.educalc.net/1904485.page). Add, subtract, multiply. divide, end of story.

ReMark
28th Mar 2014, 05:10 pm
Come to think of it my first hand held calculator was probably an abacus.:lol:

ROBP
28th Mar 2014, 10:16 pm
Come to think of it my first hand held calculator was probably an abacus.:lol:


The good old days fingers did the job mistakes included hihihihi, then came the sliding ruler and finally the Texas Instrument and so on...