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Dennis
30th Mar 2011, 03:33 pm
Hy,

I made blocks on my computer for the companie were I'm having my internship. I made the blocks on my own computer with a student version.
now the problem is that wen ever de people use one of my blocks they al have a
stamp on the outprint. "produced by an educational version" it says. can't it be turnd of since the people that work here have legal versions. becaus it does not look verry professional towards the custumors.

please help me ore I can remake all the blocks a made this far.http://www.cadtutor.net/forum/images/icons/icon9.gif

rkent
30th Mar 2011, 03:47 pm
Oh boy, here we go again.

Look at the bottom of this page for similar and frequent postings.

ReMark
30th Mar 2011, 03:58 pm
We keep warning users about this downside to using an educational version of an AutoDesk product in a commercial environment and some choose to ignore the warning. This is a prime example of what happens when one does what one should not do. In essence the well-meaning student has "infected" some of the drawings of the company he is interning with. Think they will look kindly on this?

Cad64
30th Mar 2011, 04:34 pm
Apparently the teachers do not instruct the students as to the issues of using the educational version for commercial purposes? :?

Or maybe the students just aren't paying attention? :unsure:

designerstuart
30th Mar 2011, 04:47 pm
yet another example of the massive gap between school and work - they are just different worlds that never seem to talk to one another.

JD Mather
30th Mar 2011, 04:48 pm
..Or maybe the students just aren't paying attention? :unsure:

Or maybe users are ignoring the warning boxes that pop up when they try to use edu content in their commercial work.

Dennis,
Start over.

JD Mather
30th Mar 2011, 04:49 pm
yet another example of the massive gap between school and work ....


Yes, apparently those who have finished school - finished without learning to read.

designerstuart
30th Mar 2011, 05:03 pm
Dennis,
Start over.
Dennis, you have been JD'd
sorry mate!

glynowen81
30th Mar 2011, 09:17 pm
Hi Dennis

Email me your drawing(s) and I will see what I can do for you as I had this problem a few months ago.
My email is glynowen81@gmail.com .

nestly
30th Mar 2011, 09:31 pm
Kinda hard to miss, IMO
26777

Cad64
31st Mar 2011, 12:58 am
Apparently no one at this company paid attention in class, or is paying attention at their workstation. :roll:
How can anyone miss that message? You have to click not once, but twice to get past the warnings and open the drawing. :?

Just out of curiosity Dennis, if you're still here, where are you located? Judging from the spelling and grammar in your post I'm guessing that English is not your native language? :unsure:

MarcoW
31st Mar 2011, 06:36 am
Apparently no one at this company paid attention in class, or is paying attention at their workstation. :roll:
How can anyone miss that message? You have to click not once, but twice to get past the warnings and open the drawing. :?

Just out of curiosity Dennis, if you're still here, where are you located? Judging from the spelling and grammar in your post I'm guessing that English is not your native language? :unsure:

My guess (how dare I) is that his native language is Dutch.
Two links I remember: number one (http://www.cadtutor.net/forum/showthread.php?53363-did-you-google-it&p=361554&viewfull=1#post361554), and two (http://www.cadtutor.net/forum/showthread.php?53332-No-response-from-original-poster.) but it's still early.

Organic
31st Mar 2011, 09:09 am
Try one of these two these methods:

http://www.draftsperson.net/index.php?title=How_to_Remove_the_Educational_Stam p_in_AutoCAD

or

http://caddsoftwares.com/how-to-remove-produced-by-an-autodesk-educational-product-plot-stamp/66

wbsherlock
31st Mar 2011, 10:35 pm
In all fairness to those of us who accidentally "infect" our drawings with a block or detail or something that someone else created in an educational product, the stamp does not appear to show up in version 2000 at all. I received a drawing from someone where one of the blocks had been created in an educational version, and I inserted it unknowingly into my drawing. It was only LATER when someone else tried to open the drawing in 2005 that the warning sign came up! I had no clue I had infected my original drawing, and it took FOREVER to isolate the problem and fix it. I basically used a combination of the tricks in the previous poster's links (using the recover command, then dxfout/dxfin) to remove the stamp. Now that very same drawing will open up in 2005 just fine with no warning sign. And yes, I am resistant to change! I still use, and LOVE, Autocad 2000.

JD Mather
31st Mar 2011, 11:13 pm
In all fairness to those of us who accidentally "infect" our drawings ....

You right, there was a time years and years ago that no warning was given. I noticed in the OP's profile that a later version was being used.

When the student starts a new file in student version it gives them a warning.
And when someone tries to use edu content in commercial it gives them two warnings.

I would remove all references to methods to violate ethics.
There are now over 2 million student members of the student community.
Do you want to compete with someone using free software?

nestly
31st Mar 2011, 11:46 pm
I would remove all references to methods to violate ethics.


I agree. I don't think methods for circumventing software security features should ever be posted in public. If it's an honest mistake, I'm sure Autodesk would help them resolve the problem.

ReMark
1st Apr 2011, 11:20 am
I agree. I don't think methods for circumventing software security features should ever be posted in public. If it's an honest mistake, I'm sure Autodesk would help them resolve the problem.
We keep revisiting this topic. I too fell into the same trap a while back and was informed that since at least one method for eliminating the educational stamp was put forth by AutoDesk itself there was no harm in making mention of it. I am not defending the practice however.

ReMark
1st Apr 2011, 11:46 am
Dennis, investigate saving the drawing in R12 DXF to cure the problem.
That approach was already covered in Dink's post (#13) with his two links. You're a bit late to the party. LOL

Cad64
1st Apr 2011, 03:24 pm
Concerning the second link in post #13: Contrary to what's written on that page, there is no bug that causes the educational stamp to just appear in your drawings for no reason. It only happens when you use someone's drawing that was created with the educational software.


Quick research shows that the stamp is some kind of Autodesk bug (not sure about this but this is what I read from autocad forum & discussion).I just want to make that clear and stop the spread of false information online. The educational stamp is NOT a bug.

And the method for removal should only be used in case of emergency if you were somehow, unknowingly, infected with the stamp. I don't know how that could possibly happen, but if that's the case, there is a fix. But this method should NOT be used for the purpose of circumventing the stamp so you can use the educational software for commercial purposes.

Rob-GB
1st Apr 2011, 03:50 pm
I would remove all references to methods to violate ethics.

I agree, but only when the coding recognizes that the DWG was opened with a paid for and legitimate installation of Autocad, why should legitimate users get grief/costs due to a block that was created while a person was a student if it is useful, many quality students will eventually run their own companies and buy many "licences" why can't they use drawings they produced in their early years if needed.


There are now over 2 million student members of the student community.
Do you want to compete with someone using free software?

We already compete with countries who get to pay less for the software and some that use pirated software...what makes the difference is the quality of work and knowledge used in the execution of the projects.
I respect that you are in an educational role and often speak your mind (often what I would say to the subject poster :wink:) and that you most often give great advice....but sometimes I wonder if you think through what you post, there are so many variables.
With respect,
Rob

nestly
1st Apr 2011, 04:01 pm
I agree, but only when the coding recognizes that the DWG was opened with a paid for and legitimate installation of Autocad, why should legitimate users get grief/costs due to a block that was created while a person was a student if it is useful....


Because that block was created with free software intended for educational purposes. Using that work product for commercial purposes violates ethical business practices, not to mention the license agreement(s) for both versions.

f700es
1st Apr 2011, 04:12 pm
I agree with Nestly above. If you can't afford AutoCAD (and some can't and that's cool) there are cheap and free alternatives that offer DWG editing ability. While I do understand the occasional hang up of dealing with a block and drawing that is infected with a educational item I do not condone circumventing the security measure for lazy users or cheats. Now having said this it happens and sometimes it's just easier to deal with it and go one. There is the save-as a r12 DXF which will remove the item but this is honestly not a game changer as with this you also lose all the newer features of the drawing and is really only useful for the "occasional block" that can be cleaned up.

Jack_O'neill
1st Apr 2011, 05:27 pm
I can see both sides of the argument, but lets look at it realistically. If you created a "block" in school and now you've got a job where that block is would come in handy, how hard could it possibly be to redraw it? If you created it as a student, now that you've graduated, you should be even faster and might even improve it along the way. Even if you have to open it (or print it even) and look at it while you draw the replacement, it surely can't take more than a matter of minutes to recreate. I really can't see these things being very complicated. What are the chances that you just happen to have a whole set of drawings for the new city center that are just exactly what an architect is looking for...that you created in school? Come on.

Some will raise the issue of "intellectual property". What you create is yours, right? Well, maybe. If you take this "block" to work at your new job, and don't sell the block to them under a contract, and then put it in one of the company's drawings it becomes the property of the company you work for. They paid you to create it, is how they'll look at it. It was just a normal part of doing your job. The stuff you create while on the company's payroll belongs to them, not you.

So my advice, if this argument is really over using a few blocks created in school is to draw it again. Going through all the effort to get rid of that watermark will take more time than recreating the stuff in the first place and there's no question of it's legality, morality, or any other -ity you want to question.

If you are looking for a way to use educational software for business purposes, I'm sure you'll find it. Criminals are remarkably successful, and the ways to do it are plastered all over the web, as are sources for the software.

I just took a look at Autodesk's website. Did a search there for "remove educational watermark" and got 259 hits in thier discussion forum. Searching this forum finds 23 threads. It's been hashed out quite well I should think.

bass_mark00
1st Apr 2011, 05:47 pm
I agree with Nestly above. If you can't afford AutoCAD (and some can't and that's cool) there are cheap and free alternatives that offer DWG editing ability. While I do understand the occasional hang up of dealing with a block and drawing that is infected with a educational item I do not condone circumventing the security measure for lazy users or cheats. Now having said this it happens and sometimes it's just easier to deal with it and go one. There is the save-as a r12 DXF which will remove the item but this is honestly not a game changer as with this you also lose all the newer features of the drawing and is really only useful for the "occasional block" that can be cleaned up.

I agree. It's naive to suggest that saving to R12 DXF is a viable, sustainable business model that's a threat to legitimate business and paid-up users. Real software pirates are the problem, not students feeling their way into their first jobs. Secondly, saving back is a legitimate AutoCAD function, are there any other standard commands that anyone would like to suggest as being unethical?

nestly
1st Apr 2011, 05:54 pm
I agree. It's naive to suggest that saving to R12 DXF is a viable, sustainable business model that's a threat to legitimate business and paid-up users. Real software pirates are the problem, not students feeling their way into their first jobs. Secondly, saving back is a legitimate AutoCAD function, are there any other standard commands that anyone would like to suggest as being unethical?

If you're suggesting that it's "ethical" to circumvent the Edu watermark simply because it can be done with features included in the software, I believe you'd be in the minority, but feel free to email legal@autodesk.com and ask them their opinion.

fuccaro
2nd Apr 2011, 06:46 am
If you created a "block" in school and now you've got a job where that block is would come in handy, how hard could it possibly be to redraw it? If you created it as a student, now that you've graduated, you should be even faster and might even improve it along the way.
Before the dynamic blocks, I created collections of blocks. I had about 600 screws, aslo nuts and all kind of washers, all of them in 3D, side front and top view -just ready to be inserted. All blocks had 3 hidden attributes used by a lisp to generate the BOM. If such a collection should be recreated so probable the drafter would consider cheating a little bit.
I newer used educational software and I agree that educational programs may not be use for profit. I just try to see the other aspects of the problem

JD Mather
2nd Apr 2011, 11:54 am
....due to a block that was created while a person was a student if it is useful, many quality students will eventually run their own companies and buy many "licences" why can't they use drawings they produced in their early years if needed.

Uhmm, perhaps because of the student EULA they agreed to in return for free learning software. No excuses.

ReMark
2nd Apr 2011, 12:12 pm
And the beat goes on.

eldon
2nd Apr 2011, 12:15 pm
If the students were really switched on, could they not save their blocks in R12 DXF format :?

Dennis
5th Apr 2011, 07:33 am
Just out of curiosity Dennis, if you're still here, where are you located? Judging from the spelling and grammar in your post I'm guessing that English is not your native language? :unsure:[/QUOTE]


Sorry guys! for the late reply, English isn't my native language! I'm from Belgium. But I am trying my best here.

I solved the issue with dxfout/dxfin and save it in a full version. the company also provided me with a version that isn't an educational one. so I can proceed my work.
thanks anyway!

dennis

bonji
26th Apr 2011, 07:38 am
Try one of these two these methods:

http://www.draftsperson.net/index.php?title=How_to_Remove_the_Educational_Stam p_in_AutoCAD

or

http://caddsoftwares.com/how-to-remove-produced-by-an-autodesk-educational-product-plot-stamp/66


tried both of them not working
some times dxfout method working but when u have multiple blocks that copied from student vision you have to explode the blocks to get full results until unless the Dxfout command is not functioning in full