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tzframpton

3D AutoCAD Render Tip: Quick settings with great results

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tzframpton
Thanks bro.. I am still a student. I really wanted to learn autocad bro. But The problem is that I don't have the software yet. I don't know where to get the software. I like all the post in this forum. All of them really amaze me. I am trying to understand there posts but still I don't get it. Can you teach me the basic bro? well, i know that I don't have the software yet. But i still want to learn. Is it possible that I can still learn without software bro?

There are educational copies available for free with full access to the program. Check http://www.autodesk.com for more info.

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reccakeys

Thanks Bro, Where can I get the free trial? Can you help me? You know what bro, some people laugh at me because I don't know autocad. It's a pity. Is it a mistake that I've join in this forum?

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reccakeys

Thanks for sharing the information bro. It really helps a lot. I will visit the site now.

 

Once again, thank you

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MrButtonmush

Having used Acad for Plans since the 90's, I'm looking at dipping my toes into 3D and although I shall be self learning SketchUp, I'd like to get a basic understanding of it in ACAD.

I have be put off to date by what seems like an almost purposeful attempt to make 3D as awkward as possible when using AutoCAD. I've created some models but it takes me ages and is such a pain.

To the original poster (or others) I'd really like to know how you got to the drawing that you start with?

Currently I would draw a rectangle for the floor. Use either an extrusion or 3D poly line to make the walls then extrude the shapes. Is this right?

How should one create this scene and then apply textures to them?

I learn quick but "by doing" not reading long text descriptions and although this scene is simple, it can extrapolate a lot from it's creation.

All and any help appreciated!

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ReMark

Is your profile correct re: AutoCAD 2006? I ask because there is a command called PolySolid which can be used to create 3D walls. I cannot recall if it was available in 2006.

 

You refer to a scene. Had you intended to attach an image with your post?

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MrButtonmush

Ahh. nope. I'm currently Acad Full Vanilla 2011 pending upgrade to 2013. Sorry for that!

Scene I refer to is the one at the beginning of this thread. 2 walls, floor, cylinder and cube etc.

Just having a play with "3Dface" actually. Curious though if I wanted to make a wall or floor of no thickness, do I need to draw it as a polyline or lines first then go over it with 3Dface (like a hatch) or will just a face do on it's own?

(I shall update profile by the way)

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tzframpton
Ahh. nope. I'm currently Acad Full Vanilla 2011 pending upgrade to 2013. Sorry for that!

Scene I refer to is the one at the beginning of this thread. 2 walls, floor, cylinder and cube etc.

Just having a play with "3Dface" actually. Curious though if I wanted to make a wall or floor of no thickness, do I need to draw it as a polyline or lines first then go over it with 3Dface (like a hatch) or will just a face do on it's own?

(I shall update profile by the way)

For my example back in 2009, I simply used Solid Primitives just to use as an example. Here's a link for more information:

http://exchange.autodesk.com/autocad/enu/online-help/search#WS1a9193826455f5ffa23ce210c4a30acaf-68d0.htm

 

The more you familiarize yourself with Primitives, the easier it is to create your basic and foundational geometry. However, most of your more advanced 3D AutoCAD modelers have many other ways in creating basic geometry using a combination of 3D commands with 2D profiles. Some examples would be the Extrude, Revolve, Presspull, or Sweep commands. Link for more information:

http://exchange.autodesk.com/autocad/enu/online-help/search#WS1a9193826455f5ff61d1e3e812435c7cb1b-63fc.htm

 

Next steps usually involve more advanced solid modeling, which is where you'll find yourself getting into actually editing or manipulating models. This is where real creativity comes in, and to this day I'm still amazed at seeing how other advanced 3D AutoCAD designers come up with their models. One of my favorite, and in my opinion most powerful tools, is the combination of the INTERSECT and SUBTRACT commands on intersecting solids. But there are still basic commands, and techniques that can be used. Link here:

http://exchange.autodesk.com/autocad/enu/online-help/search#WS1a9193826455f5ffa23ce210c4a30acaf-679c.htm

 

One last tip. You need to understand the UCS, and learn to move and rotate it around a lot, and learn to reorient the view to the altered UCS - it will make life much easier. Also, toggling the OSNAPZ system variable is a good one to know.

 

Here's a recent tutorial I did and can give you some insight on how I build basic 3D models:

Unable to display content. Adobe Flash is required.

 

Also look in my signature at my guitar project to see how I get my inspirations from (dimensions, ideas, etc).

 

Hope this helps. :)

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ReMark

I'm puzzled by your use of 3DFace. What is the advantage?

 

AutoCAD 2011 should have the PolySolid command. You can build your walls easily using this command.

 

I work at a chemical plant and all of our 3D drawings are done using plain AutoCAD. That includes structural steel framing, concrete block, concrete slabs, corrugated siding and roofing, and all of our piping and valves.

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tzframpton
I'm puzzled by your use of 3DFace. What is the advantage?

 

AutoCAD 2011 should have the PolySolid command. You can build your walls easily using this command.

Not trying to insult, but I don't think the poster understands 3D very well. :)

 

I will say this... 3DFace isn't something I use... hardly ever. I would stay away from this command, especially if you're just getting into 3D.

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MrButtonmush
I'm puzzled by your use of 3DFace. What is the advantage?

 

No idea, hence my question. A quick bit of Googling brought it up. I shall have a play with Polysolid now.

 

One last tip. You need to understand the UCS

 

joy! (but thanks) I'll take a looky at your tutorial later!

Edited by Cad64
Fixed Quotes

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MrButtonmush

Just had a play with UCS etc., that's fine. Also moving things around in 3D space. Tried Polysolid, just draws a faint polyline that hardly shows up and look no different to a normal polyline.

update.

Interesting, see how you can use it to turn 2D lines into 3D, initial dabble raises some questions but more playing first!

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Asousa_13

Hi , I'm from Portugal , and hi've donne the render settings like you said , but in a Higger Scene ( with more objects_ like a Interior of a House) it don´t works , the time it's too long same!!!! ... Can you help me , I think that must adjust one thing more in Advanced Render Settings "i work in autocad 2009"

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ReMark
Just had a play with UCS etc., that's fine. Also moving things around in 3D space. Tried Polysolid, just draws a faint polyline that hardly shows up and look no different to a normal polyline.

update.

Interesting, see how you can use it to turn 2D lines into 3D, initial dabble raises some questions but more playing first!

 

Not sure but you have done something wrong. What option(s) did you elect to use with this command?

 

POLYSOLID

Specify start point or [Object/Height/Width/Justify] :

Edited by ReMark

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ReMark

Polysolid example.

 

Polysolid Example.PNG

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HaxLi

Just a suggestion to use Autodesk Showcase for fast render job ;]

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Casusa

Hi.

 

In Autocad 2014 where can i define sky?

 

Thanks.

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tzframpton

If you change to the "3D Modeling" Workspace, it's located under the Render tab. You first have to be in PERSPECTIVE mode for it to be enabled.

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Casusa

Thanks tzframpton.

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