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delliott

How about Rel. 9

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Hey ppl! First post here.

 

My first ACAD was r10 on DOS, but I got started on CADAM (anyone remember that?) with a black and white tube and a light pen! Had that big ole function box to the left with the "indicate" and "yes/no" buttons...

:D

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ReMark

First computer: Olivetti-Underwood. Had to "program" the computer by sliding a long, narrow piece of plastic through a housing that would "read" it. Used to figure out curve stationing for surveying.

 

First serious computer: An Apple with two floppy drives and a 13" monochrome monitor. I think the color was green. After that it was an Apple IIe. Wow, life in the fast lane!

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yedan

ah the good ol days, think my first release was R9 or R10 complete with tablet and xtreegold although i started with just plain ol xtree.

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CADTutor
ah the good ol days, think my first release was R9 or R10 complete with tablet and xtreegold although i started with just plain ol xtree.

 

OMG, I'd forgotten about Xtreegold! Take a look at this - those memories come flooding back.

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f700es
OMG, I'd forgotten about Xtreegold! Take a look at this - those memories come flooding back.

 

:lol: Doom2, ah the memories 8)8)8)

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yedan

hehe doom2 heck i remember doom the original and the forfather of that castle wolfstien 3d

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dumfatnhappy

yeah, wolfenstein changed the gaming world completely

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Rickard5

MY First "REAL" usable computer was an OSI with Basic in ROM, my first go at cadd was Autocad 10 on a 5150 IBM PC with an INTEL above Board and a Whole Mb of Ems and a 10 Mb Full hight 5.25 Hard Drive :) I loved that machine it had my eprom burner in it :) and I still love Basica.

if any one finds a copy of 9 or erlier I'm offering TOP $$$$$ for it

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tzframpton

Rickard, I sent you and email about the software. Too big to email but I can meet up with you - did you not get it? :)

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ReMark

While nosing around in the dusty confines of my cubicle I came across the following:

 

- 3.5" floppy disks for AutoCAD LT Release 2 for Windows 3.1

 

- 5.5" floppy disks for AutoCAD Release 9, 11, 11c2 and 12(demo)

 

- CD for AutoCAD LT 97

 

Who knew!

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motoxrcr

I started on 9 also. I remember it well.

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Coosbaylumber

Will someone take a look in their documentation and tell me as to what brand and type (or model number) of plotter or digitizer the release used?

 

I used to think that R-13 had the biggest array of models, but looks am wrong now.

 

Wm.

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ReMark

What seems to be the problem? You're not trying to get some piece of equipment from 1990 to work are you?

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Coosbaylumber

No, just had an interest.

 

 

But, main item is that had been told the R-13 was the most compatible version - ever. It had a HUGE list of compatible items available. Only thing I remember about R-13 was it was the most argumentative version ever. I don't think you could open up one drawing more than five times w/o some sort of problem developing. Usually happened to me in the mornings. I often waited until afternoon to digitize or do a plot too. Allow someone else to experiment that day. You pick up those kinks real fast.

 

Wm.

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ReMark

Maybe that huge list was a product of trying to serve two masters i.e. - DOS and Windows.

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Coosbaylumber

My reccolection is that we were on some version of the many Win. 95 at the time. It used to get blamed for near evertything. Installed R-114 and had same exact problems, but more options and a shorter list of available hardware to plug into. We were asked at beginning load up as to if we knew the type of plotter to be installed, or would like to choose one from list, or wait until later on.

 

R-14 had too many options, and did not like to talk to the computer across the hallway either.

 

I have a H-P UX version here (for free), that got loaded into DOS and it works just fine.

 

Wm.

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ReMark

I loved r14. It was the release I ended up doing the most as far as customizing went.

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Ryder76

The first release I ever saw was 2.0 on an old 8086 back in 1988. By 1991 I was in college and learning on rel. 9 and 10 - Also microstation 4 (I think).

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Coosbaylumber
The first release I ever saw was 2.0 on an old 8086 back in 1988. By 1991 I was in college and learning on rel. 9 and 10 - Also microstation 4 (I think).

 

 

I am trying to remember back when, but I was picked in the office to give a demo of the Calcomp plotter and digitizer at work in very early 1980's. Someone from their office dropped off a set of 180 floppy disks, and during lunchtime once we got our IBM 8086 and 8087 to working. It worked for about 1/2 day then we quit. Sent a thank-you letter back was all I remember doing now. Then, about late 1980's I think version six was out. My first job at a newer employer was to unload and reinstall version 8 or 9 over the earlier system, or use the mainframe. Which I did. We (I) loaded it up onto some very fast 286 and we were rocketing off then.

 

Next employer (in Palm Springs) got me to load up some R-10 onto a 386/16 machine that was specially rigged and cost more than $3000 for the basic computer only. I think we used H-P digitizers and plotters exclusivly there. Did not realize that R-11 and R-12 would load up just as easy (or easier) onto the 486 computers, until it was time to leave. It was a bigger program then, but the drives ran faster and the disks had more capacity too.

 

Wm.

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Coosbaylumber
By 1991 I was on .... Also microstation 4 (I think).

 

One of my employers used Microstation exclusively in early 1990s' as they had quite a bit of work for the Calif. Dept of transportation locally. CALTRANS would only accept disks converted or working on Microstation at the time. I think Micro was less confusing then too, but I got to running the numbers on a mainframe as a backup about same time. (Got paid more too).

 

 

Wm.

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