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You know your an old draughtsman when...

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resullins
Did anyone ever get that "High Pay Job in Drafting"?

 

I'm still working on that. I'm pretty sure you have to sell your soul, though... and I seem to have misplaced mine.

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Jack_O'neill

I like the bit where it says "you need no drawing skill...no technical ability". Now we know where all these people come from that we get on here and gripe about!!

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Squirltech
I like the bit where it says "you need no drawing skill...no technical ability". Now we know where all these people come from that we get on here and gripe about!!

 

I resemble that remark... :P

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SLW210
I resemble that remark... :P

 

Judging by your avatar and ReMark's avatar, I would say you do not resemble that ReMark.

 

On closer inspection...maybe........

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Dana W
Did anyone ever get that "High Pay Job in Drafting"?

 

Well, right after I got drafted after high school (in which I took a drafting class) in 1967, I hadda walk up two flights of stairs to see the paymaster in basic training. Does that count?

Prolly not, the only tool the army taught me to use that made anything close to a straight line was a rifle. I could make curved lines at 1000 m with the tracers from a ma deuce (M2 Browning 50 cal machine gun).

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ReMark

Remember any of these?

 

Drafting tables as large as a sheet of plywood.

 

2" high Leroy lettering templates with a scribe that had to be 6-8" long.

 

Koh-i-noor pens.

 

Blueline pencils.

 

.3mm, .5mm, .7mm and .9mm Pentel mechanical pencils.

 

Pencil sharpener on your drafting board.

 

Thin sheets of sandpaper on a wood handle for sharpening lead points.

 

Lead shot bean bags for holding down drawings.

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Dana W
Remember any of these?

 

Drafting tables as large as a sheet of plywood.

 

I worked on a drafting table that was a full sheet of plywood, in a construction trailer, building residential homes in Waldorf MD back in the 70's. It had a sheet of linoleum glued to the surface:shock: and the lower right corner was riddled with cigarette burns.

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ReMark

We covered our drafting boards with a piece of vinyl that had a different color on both sides. Green on one side and a buff color on the other. Would attach it to the drafting table using double-sided tape.

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Dipali

I sometimes miss those hand drafting days...........

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Dana W
We covered our drafting boards with a piece of vinyl that had a different color on both sides. Green on one side and a buff color on the other. Would attach it to the drafting table using double-sided tape.

 

Me too. Self healing board covers, they were called. I suppose you could consider them self healed because you could barely see all the razor knife cuts in the surface from the old fashioned cut/paste methods, and the cuts didn't catch on the pencil lead. At least they were invisible until they filled up with graphite dust.

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ReMark

I have a set of drawings for my house (built 1 9 0 8 that was done by hand in ink on linen. Looks like a piece of art.

Edited by ReMark

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BigDog

My senior year of high school started when AutoCAD R12 was released. I walked into my last drafting class the first day of school and the teacher handed my the R12 book and told me to see how far I could get buy the end of the year. The good old days.

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DANIEL

I've done burnt stick on wooly mammoth hide, no, wait .... thats just what type of drawings I get from vendors sometimes .......

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f700es
I have a set of drawings for my house (built 1908) that was done by hand in ink on linen. Looks like a piece of art.

 

Those rock! I was digging through the old plans we have here and dug up the original chapel drawing from 1951. Artwork in it's highest form IMHO.

Here's a snippet..

 

snip.jpg

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Manila Wolf

NTS Was often "Not to scale", but more commonly "Not Too Sure"

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Bill Tillman
... you seriously considered entering the field because of an ad in a comic book.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]30299[/ATTACH]

 

CyberAngel, I can't believe you found this somewhere. Believe it or not this is the very ad that I saw and what got me interested in becoming a draftsman. I can't remember which magazine I was reading but this was the ad and I remember it well. It would have been sometime in the early 1970's I think for me it would have been around 1972 or 1973. We all complain about the pay, but I remember getting out of college with my AA degree in Drafting Technology and immediately commanding the astronomical pay rate of $6 per hour. This was in 1978 when most of my friends were lucky to get $4 per hour. Then not long afterwards I was making the then unheard of sum of $10 per hour. Shessh, I didn't know what to do with all the cash so I blew it all on wine, women and song....These days it's not as easy to command the big bucks and jobs are few and far between.

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cadvision

when you're called a "draftsman" "draughtsman" and not a cad operator. Trained on a drawing board and proud of it

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amarcon

You know you are an old Draughtsman when............................

 

- when asked what you do for a crust? you'd reply.... 'scratching for a living'.

- you know a parallel motion machine is not an exerciser.

- a lettering guide is not a pamphlet.

- you knew every rotring pen thickness by colour.

 

This is priceless....

I was a senior detailer by the time AutoCAD v1.14 became available in Australia in 1983/4?...... gosh I *AM* and old draughtsman. We were annoyed because the first CAD drawing I did took a full 40hr week to complete, when it used to take 4hrs on the board :(

After 12 months I had the same drawing down to around 1/2 hr :P

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resullins
when you're called a "draftsman" "draughtsman" and not a cad operator. Trained on a drawing board and proud of it

 

Hey... I might be the youngest regular contributor here, and even I learned on a board, by hand. I still have carpal tunnel in my left wrist from it! It's all about having educators that appreciate the classics.

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Organic
when you're called a "draftsman" "draughtsman" and not a cad operator. Trained on a drawing board and proud of it

 

Politically incorrect, you are forgetting the women... :P

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